Apple won't have gigabit downloads on 'iPhone 8' because of Intel modems - report

Posted:
in iPhone
Although Apple already has access to Qualcomm modems with gigabit download speeds, it won't enable that bandwidth in upcoming iPhones due to its use of Intel chips as well, according to a report.




Intel is working on gigabit-capable modems, but they won't be ready in time for the "iPhone 8" and "7s" this fall, Bloomberg sources said on Friday. As with the iPhone 7, Apple is expected to use a split of Qualcomm and Intel modems, but throttle the performance of the Qualcomm parts to keep experiences consistent across devices.

Earlier this month a report claimed that Apple is shifting to a 50-50 mix of Qualcomm and Intel.

Apple could in theory return to using Qualcomm as an exclusive supplier, but the two businesses are locked in an intense legal battle over royalties. Apple has accused Qualcomm of withholding money, abusing its market dominance, and forcing chip buyers to sign licensing agreements.

Rival phones with gigabit speeds are already on the market, such as the Samsung Galaxy S8 and the HTC U11. Reduced bandwidth is unlikely to have any major impact on iPhone buyers this year, however -- 1 gigabit per second is the theoretical maximum of LTE Advanced and extremely rare, requiring perfect conditions, including compatible towers. It may become an issue as LTE-A becomes more commonplace and the industry eventually migrates to 5G technology.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 54
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    What countries, carriers, cities, and specific locations even offer those kind of speeds if they were using Qualcomm's best radios in the iPhone?

    Bottom line: Does this actually affect anyone's bandwidth?
    vukasikatallest skil
  • Reply 2 of 54
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,286member
    Soli said:
    What countries, carriers, cities, and specific locations even offer those kind of speeds if they were using Qualcomm's best radios in the iPhone?

    Bottom line: Does this actually affect anyone's bandwidth?
    Austin Tx is one of the first if not the first US cities, already offered by ATT. Apparently New Orleans also has it available thru a different carrier, perhaps T-Mo? 
    (EDIT: Nope. In New Orleans it's Sprint offering Gigabit service.) 

    Indianapolis will be the next ATT city to receive Gigabit service. Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco (supposedly a couple of others) will join the trials in the next few months.

    Verizon announced Gigabit trial service in Ann Arbor, Atlanta, Bernardsville, N.J., Brockton, Mass., Dallas, Denver, Houston, Miami, Sacramento, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. with other cities following later this year.  

    Worldwide there's 15 carriers in 11 different countries already offering Gigabit LTE. For instance Telstra is currently deploying it in Sydney, Australia. There's also another 47 carriers that have Gigabit systems in various stages of prep. 
    edited June 2017 anantksundaramwelshdogCynflorneo-tech
  • Reply 3 of 54
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,258member
    Stupid analysts who haven't the faintest idea how this will (actually won't) work clobbered AAPL today. Just because Qualcomm has the ability to produce speeds like this in perfect conditions over short distances, doesn't mean anyone will get these speeds any time soon. Until there are cell towers every half mile (or closer depending on terrain), nobody will see these speeds. I am lucky to get 1 dot at my house and I doubt Verizon is going to install (or be allowed to install) new towers or even better gear on the existing towers. Give it another 5 years and maybe the infrastructure will be there but I wouldn't even bet on it happening then. 

    I don't live in an overcrowded metropolis, which also won't see these speeds even with the proper gear because there will be too many users.
    edited June 2017 magman1979willcropointGeorgeBMacCynflorfrankiebonobob
  • Reply 4 of 54
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,926member
    Unverified reports about an unannounce phone claim Apple won't be able produce by an unannounced date. 
    tallest skilmagman1979pscooter63Cynflorcornchiplkruppmike1frankie
  • Reply 5 of 54
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,917member
    Having stronger horses pulling slow cart. You ain't going go to faster. It's fact that 1GB wireless speed capability on phone has no advantage because cell networks are not able to support more than 300MB in real world usage scenarios. True 5G networks won't be in full swing until 2020.
    edited June 2017 coolfactormike1
  • Reply 6 of 54
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member
    I think this was a story planted by Qcom to hurt Apple's stock.
    magman1979stevenozmwhitejkichlinemike1frankiejony0
  • Reply 7 of 54
    Carriers in the US can't give us speeds that max out the current phones we have now. Houston will never see blazing fast speeds. I'd rather be at home on wifi. 
    mike1
  • Reply 8 of 54
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,038member
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    What countries, carriers, cities, and specific locations even offer those kind of speeds if they were using Qualcomm's best radios in the iPhone?

    Bottom line: Does this actually affect anyone's bandwidth?
    Austin Tx is one of the first if not the first US cities, already offered by ATT. Apparently New Orleans also has it available thru a different carrier, perhaps T-Mo? 
    (EDIT: Nope. In New Orleans it's Sprint offering Gigabit service.) 

    Indianapolis will be the next ATT city to receive Gigabit service. Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco (supposedly a couple of others) will join the trials in the next few months.

    Verizon announced Gigabit trial service in Ann Arbor, Atlanta, Bernardsville, N.J., Brockton, Mass., Dallas, Denver, Houston, Miami, Sacramento, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. with other cities following later this year.  

    Worldwide there's 15 carriers in 11 different countries already offering Gigabit LTE. For instance Telstra is currently deploying it in Sydney, Australia. There's also another 47 carriers that have Gigabit systems in various stages of prep. 
    So there are carriers that already support every device with the proper cellular modem having 1024 MiB downloads? I feel like we've been here before with big claims that have ended up not ending up as real world results do to a variety of other limitations. I'd love to see some device testing in these markets.
    edited June 2017 mike1
  • Reply 9 of 54
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,286member
    Soli said:
    gatorguy said:
    Soli said:
    What countries, carriers, cities, and specific locations even offer those kind of speeds if they were using Qualcomm's best radios in the iPhone?

    Bottom line: Does this actually affect anyone's bandwidth?
    Austin Tx is one of the first if not the first US cities, already offered by ATT. Apparently New Orleans also has it available thru a different carrier, perhaps T-Mo? 
    (EDIT: Nope. In New Orleans it's Sprint offering Gigabit service.) 

    Indianapolis will be the next ATT city to receive Gigabit service. Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco (supposedly a couple of others) will join the trials in the next few months.

    Verizon announced Gigabit trial service in Ann Arbor, Atlanta, Bernardsville, N.J., Brockton, Mass., Dallas, Denver, Houston, Miami, Sacramento, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. with other cities following later this year.  

    Worldwide there's 15 carriers in 11 different countries already offering Gigabit LTE. For instance Telstra is currently deploying it in Sydney, Australia. There's also another 47 carriers that have Gigabit systems in various stages of prep. 
    So there are carriers that already support every device with the proper cellular modem having 1024 MiB downloads?
    As I've read there's only a handful of smartphones so far that have the proper Qualcomm chipsets. Moto has one, and the Samsung S8 and HTC11 are others here in the US. Worldwide I don't know who sells them outside of HTC and Samsung but I'd guess there are others. FWIW there will be at least a dozen or so handset models compatible with Gigabit LTE by the fall. 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 10 of 54
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 2,259member
    Yup, this is purely marketing at this point. Great to see so many people posting logic here.

    I'd like to see a comparison of LTE vs LTE-A for a typical usage scenario and see if there's any real-world differences. For general web browsing, I don't expect much change, since many hosting providers aren't even at 1Gps rate yet, and there's lots of hops in between to negotiate. Where I could expect a nice boost is apps like Dropbox uploading your photos to your account. That should go much quicker on LTE-A, creating a much more seamless experience across devices.
  • Reply 11 of 54
    maestro64 said:
    I think this was a story planted by Qcom to hurt Apple's stock.

    Just like I'm convinced Qualcomm "loaned" $500,000 in high-end cellular radio test equipment to that no-name blogger to do that stupid test comparing Qualcomm modems to Intel modems and "concluding" the Intel ones were significantly slower.

    Funny how there's only 3 articles on their site. One bragging about the Galaxy S7 being the first with MIMO (using the Qualcomm X12 modem), one about the Google Pixel (also using the Qualcomm X12) and the BS article comparing Qualcomm modems to Intel.
    cornchipbb-15neo-tech
  • Reply 12 of 54
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member
    This news sounds like an advertisement for Samsung Galaxy S8.
    cornchip
  • Reply 13 of 54
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,286member
    Yup, this is purely marketing at this point. Great to see so many people posting logic here.

    I'd like to see a comparison of LTE vs LTE-A for a typical usage scenario and see if there's any real-world differences. For general web browsing, I don't expect much change, since many hosting providers aren't even at 1Gps rate yet, and there's lots of hops in between to negotiate. Where I could expect a nice boost is apps like Dropbox uploading your photos to your account. That should go much quicker on LTE-A, creating a much more seamless experience across devices.
    There should be lots of data on just how effective Gigabit service is by the time the next iPhone launches. It's already live in several Australian markets and all four major carriers here in the US will have areas of service for Joe Consumer by then. It shouldn't be difficult getting the answers you want before too long. Still Gigabit LTE is just meant to fill the speed gaps until 5G starts rolling out seriously a couple years from now. 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 14 of 54
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,286member
    maestro64 said:
    I think this was a story planted by Qcom to hurt Apple's stock.
    Well "hurting Apple's stock" has no negative financial impact on Apple so why would they bother? Of course it would benefit Qualcomm to be perceived as better than Intel, and at this point they factually may be, but putting the word out to harm Apple's stock? Nah. 
    edited June 2017
  • Reply 15 of 54
    irun262irun262 Posts: 121member
    And why did AI not report this until now?  I wondered most of the morning why AAPL stock was plummeting and had no clue.  I thought they were supposed to be ahead of everybody else (the insider their name implies). 
  • Reply 16 of 54
    yojimbo007yojimbo007 Posts: 1,165member
    They have another option as well.. The new iphoneX will have the capability enbled on qualcom chips.. 7s and 7splus wont on either chip.
  • Reply 17 of 54
    raptoroo7raptoroo7 Posts: 140member
    Ok, so we can't have Gigabit downloads with the upcoming phones because Apple is having a spat with their BFF because they don't want to pay FRAND rates. They say they are being overcharged, well they can develop their own technologies and patents or pay. That aside, who cares if you cannot get theoretical download speeds of 1Gbps in the upcoming phones. First, 5G is not ratified, its not even close to determined what it is, and NO carrier will actually offer you sustained 1Gbps downloads either. So they claim to offer, sure, but you won't ever see it. Plus your download speed is half of the equation, the connection from the source sending the data also has to be able to sustain 1Gbps as well. This is simply tech specs boasting for something that has zero benefit today.
    cornchip
  • Reply 18 of 54
    There is not even a standard yet for 5G. It will be 2020 by the earliest that you will see it rolled out nationwide. Folks were selling off shares of Apple stock to take in their profit. That is the main reason Apple dipped today.
  • Reply 19 of 54
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,286member
    irun262 said:
    And why did AI not report this until now?  I wondered most of the morning why AAPL stock was plummeting and had no clue.  I thought they were supposed to be ahead of everybody else (the insider their name implies). 
    This had ZERO effect on Apple's stock price today. 

  • Reply 20 of 54
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,286member
    raptoroo7 said:
    Ok, so we can't have Gigabit downloads with the upcoming phones because Apple is having a spat with their BFF because they don't want to pay FRAND rates. They say they are being overcharged, well they can develop their own technologies and patents or pay. That aside, who cares if you cannot get theoretical download speeds of 1Gbps in the upcoming phones. First, 5G is not ratified, its not even close to determined what it is, and NO carrier will actually offer you sustained 1Gbps downloads either. So they claim to offer, sure, but you won't ever see it. Plus your download speed is half of the equation, the connection from the source sending the data also has to be able to sustain 1Gbps as well. This is simply tech specs boasting for something that has zero benefit today.
    This isn't 5G which is still a couple years out. You and others are simply confused about what's actually taking place. This is Gigabit LTE (a misnomer) which is already available, and here's the explanation of what it is:
    https://www.cnet.com/how-to/gigabit-lte-crazy-fast-wireless-speeds-explained/
    edited June 2017
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