LTE Apple Watch 'Series 3' tipped in leaked iOS 11 GM

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited September 2017
Friday's supposed iOS 11 GM leak continues to yield clues about Apple's upcoming product launches, with new evidence pointing to the imminent release of an all-new Apple Watch "Series 3" with LTE connectivity.




An image discovered within the supposed iOS 11 GM, sent to 9to5Mac, shows an Apple Watch pairing screen for iPhone that appears to include slightly redesigned Apple Watch.

Notably, a never before seen analog watch face seems to include cellular signal status bars -- or, more accurately, dots -- siting front and center just above a digital representation of a small second hand. This could be the first indication that Apple is preparing to launch a much-rumored LTE-capable wearable.

Further, the screenshot shows what appears to be complications for phone and GPS apps.

Last month, a pair of reports claimed that Apple would debut a cellular-connected Apple Watch later this year. With the new functionality, users will be able to download new songs in Music and ferry data to connected apps without need for a paired iPhone.

The refreshed device is rumored to sport the same basic form factor as current Apple Watch Series 2 devices, though the image presented in today's iOS 11 version shows a slightly tweaked external design. For example, the Digital Crown is now capped with a red dot.

Along with a new LTE-connected Apple Watch, Apple is expected to announce three new iPhones, headlined by a flagship "iPhone 8" with OLED screen, as well as a new Apple TV capable of 4K resolutions. AppleInsider will be at Apple Park covering the event live from 10 a.m. Pacific.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    Exciting! I will buy that Watch as soon as it's available and donate my Series 2 to my brother.
    repressthiswatto_cobraGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 2 of 13
    That's not the only thing that leaked. Some iPhone 8 info has leaked due to the iOS 11 GM release

    https://9to5mac.com/2017/09/08/ios-11-gm-d22-iphone-8-details/
    repressthis
  • Reply 3 of 13
    I just want my watch to automatically log into free wifi spots if the phone is unavailable. 

    I know now it's not that simple, I need to click "I agree" etc. 

    So something like 
    1) when I log my iPhone into free wifi, and get redirected to "agree", offer to agree for the watch too. 

    2) if I agree, have the phone tell the watch to connect and load the same redirect page

    3) for sites that require a free registration - then the second time I go there on my phone (is: once I have a login) then go in via my watch with the same login.  

    It'd be helpful 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 13
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,461member
    I just want my watch to automatically log into free wifi spots if the phone is unavailable. 

    I know now it's not that simple, I need to click "I agree" etc. 

    So something like 
    1) when I log my iPhone into free wifi, and get redirected to "agree", offer to agree for the watch too. 

    2) if I agree, have the phone tell the watch to connect and load the same redirect page

    3) for sites that require a free registration - then the second time I go there on my phone (is: once I have a login) then go in via my watch with the same login.  

    It'd be helpful 
    1 & 2) I'm not sure that's possible without some iPhone trickery since each splash screen for a commercial router seems to want each device to use its own router and MAC address to obtain its own IP address.

    3) If there is a regular login, sans a splash screen, I think the iPhone already sends that keychain data to the Watch, which is how it can connect to your home's WiFi network.

    Personally, I don't want my Watch connecting to any open WiFi hotspots unless there's a way to also have my VPN in play.


    PS: When the original iPhone came out when you connected to AT&T's hotspot it would also connect and agree to the legal disclaimer on the WiFi splash screen. I'm assuming it did this by MAC address blocks, but I never tested it. It was then when I came up a concept for bypass the disclaimer splash screen on public WiFi. If you had agreed to it on that network previously -and- the legal disclaimer data hadn't changed then it would automatically authenticate you. Any other condition would bring up the legal agreement to read and the Accept button.

    But how does it know if you've been there before since the last legal change? I don't think it's a good idea to have the router waste resources checking a local database for a particular machine MAC address so I came up a system that would generate a random hash code that would sent to the device after the user's initial agreement. That is then stored with the WiFi router's data and transmitted the next time it connects. This means the router doesn't have to waste resources checking every MAC address and can instantly verify the code, nor will this affect storage on any portable device since we're just talking about a few bytes of data. 

    Because you're potentially bypassing the legal document I also considered how this may be placed, named, and using a file format(s) that would be standardized. This would allow you to go into, say, an iPhone to select Settings » WiFi » (i) [Information] » Regulatory to read the legal agreement for that WiFi network. This isn't a huge issue, but it seems like it would be nice convince to have. I don't know why I never submitted it as an I-D.

  • Reply 5 of 13
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,461member
    I'm fairly certain I'll be getting a new Watch very shortly, but I'm not sure I need one that offers LTE, especially with the size, component cost, power consumption, extra battery capacity needed, and monthly service fee that would currently be attached to it—as @melgross has stated will be the case. If that's the case I'll likely just buy Series 2 at an assumed lower price point.

    bshankcornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 13
    What's up with the red capped Digital Crown? Are they going to start selling removable caps for the Digital Crown? Meh. 
  • Reply 7 of 13
    For those of you with access to the iOS 11 beta, could you let me know if the cellular signal strength indicator is still the old bar system or has it returned to filled dots in later betas?
    If the above picture is indeed of an LTE-connected Apple Watch, with filled dots indicating signal strength, I would be surprised that everyone's favourite CDO would allow that kind of discrepancy between iPhone and Apple Watch in the public release...
    cornchiprepressthis
  • Reply 8 of 13
    What's up with the red capped Digital Crown? Are they going to start selling removable caps for the Digital Crown? Meh. 
    Maybe it's a tiny e-ink display that matches whatever accent color you have on your watch face.
    cornchip
  • Reply 9 of 13
    ombra2105 said:
    For those of you with access to the iOS 11 beta, could you let me know if the cellular signal strength indicator is still the old bar system or has it returned to filled dots in later betas?
    If the above picture is indeed of an LTE-connected Apple Watch, with filled dots indicating signal strength, I would be surprised that everyone's favourite CDO would allow that kind of discrepancy between iPhone and Apple Watch in the public release...
    Still the vertical bars. 
  • Reply 10 of 13
    This is getting more and more interesting. I'd love to ditch my phone during workouts, in particular running. It's my impression AppleWatch is going more in the direction of a sports accessory. If it included accurate GPS, I'd buy a new one instantly. 
    edited September 2017 repressthiswatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 13
    Sign me up! My series 0 has served me well, but is showing its age with a few always-visible scuffs. Seems to be to be a direct upgrade in terms of processor speed and luminosity. 
    repressthiswatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 13
    macapfel said:
    This is getting more and more interesting. I'd love to ditch my phone during workouts, in particular running. It's my impression AppleWatch is going more in the direction of a sports accessory. If it included accurate GPS, I'd buy a new one instantly. 
    I won't ditch my iPhone until I can use the watch to call for help if needed.  Rumors have it that even the LTE on the watch would only allow Facetime calls (i.e., Apple to Apple) and the like rather than actual cell calls.  

    But, why do you say "IF it included accurate GPS"?   I have heard zero complaints about the Apple GPS with the minor exception that it doesn't announce when it connects.  Instead it is able to estimate distance, pace, etc. until that happens -- which is still quicker than the Garmins.
  • Reply 13 of 13
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,363member
    macapfel said:
    This is getting more and more interesting. I'd love to ditch my phone during workouts, in particular running. It's my impression AppleWatch is going more in the direction of a sports accessory. If it included accurate GPS, I'd buy a new one instantly. 
    I won't ditch my iPhone until I can use the watch to call for help if needed.  Rumors have it that even the LTE on the watch would only allow Facetime calls (i.e., Apple to Apple) and the like rather than actual cell calls.  

    But, why do you say "IF it included accurate GPS"?   I have heard zero complaints about the Apple GPS with the minor exception that it doesn't announce when it connects.  Instead it is able to estimate distance, pace, etc. until that happens -- which is still quicker than the Garmins.
    If the watch has LTE then there's no reason why it can't make a conventional phone call, except a limitation by software. If that's the case, there's no reason Apple can't make an exception for emergency calls. And either way, there's no reason why you can't make an emergency call over IP. That's how my ATT booster works at my house which has no direct cell coverage. All of my calls are VOIP, via my home wifi, and emergency services work just fine.

    so this is a completely unfounded concern.

    apple is likely restricting the use of LTE for calls to deter customers from attempting to use it for this purpose. Apple currently allows the watch to take phone calls, and that will eat through the battery in just under 3 hours without doing anything else with the watch if a person were to solely use it to make phone calls. I can only imagine how low the battery life is to support LTE calls.

    ultimately VOIP Does make the most sense here from a power standpoint, and offers no compromise over a regular cell phone call -- indeed, I've had some of the clearest calls I've ever had using voice over wifi when over 9000 miles from the caller, and connected via an LTE hotspot.
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