Rumor recap: Who was right and wrong about the iPhone X and iPhone 8

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 61
    High fives, everybody!


  • Reply 22 of 61
    Soli said:
    nhughes said:
    Soli said:
    What's wrong with his statement? He didn't state that he knows for sure that there would be nothing special for the 10th anniversary, only that he'd guess that it won't. His assumption was incorrect. He also didn't think that "iPhone ten" would be better over "iPhone Ecks," and he promptly pointed that out after it was revealed. So long as opinions are stated as such, especially if there's a detailed explanation as to why you believe that to be the case, then I see no issue with a blogger stating an opinion.
    Zero problem with him stating his opinion, of course. But he's a high profile dude who has been known to blur the lines between predictions and inside information. And despite the fact that he sometimes delves into the rumor mill himself (see his incorrect Series 3 redesign claim), he's still in Apple's good graces, with Schiller and Federighi appearing on his podcast numerous times.

    Still, credit to Gruber for putting his neck out there and, as I said in the article, owning up to it when his predictions were wrong. The point of this article was not to pick on anyone, just to give an honest summary of sources of multiple rumors leading into yesterday's event and how they fared.
    I didn't think you were picking on anyone.

    He is high-profile, but I can't say he blurs the lines because he seems to be very clear when he's been given some inside information, when it's an educated guess, and even it's a general desire. I'd even argue that he needs to reign in his reasoning a bit as they can be a little longwinded, but at the same time he clearly thinking through the reasons, even if he's making erroneous assumptions.
    When making guesses, he occasionally says things like "If I knew anything about this (and I have a very good track record of knowing these things)," which suggests to me that someone is potentially feeding him information. But of course we don't really know because he's coy about how he presents it.

    He has also gone on the attack over the years on rumor reporting despite the fact that he participates in it (he got into a twitter feud with 9to5mac over the weekend over the iOS 11 GM leak, he has been taking pot shots at Gurman/Bloomberg for awhile now for being late on scoops, there was the Dan Lyons feud years ago, and don't even get me started on the stuff he's written about us over the years). I've got no problem with the dude, but he has his circle of favored Apple media for sure.
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 23 of 61
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Nope. iPhone 8/8+ are the last implementation of TouchID. FaceID is The (Sole) Future. 
  • Reply 24 of 61
    nhughes said:
    I really don't think calling a 5.8-inch OLED screen size back in March of 2016 was a lucky guess. Nor were his reports on the Face ID technology, or the premium materials used for iPhone X, or wireless charging and glass backs on all three models, or fast USB3 charging. Those reports were accurate and consistent, and usually well before any other supply chain leaks. Kuo does have very good sources in Apple's supply chain, without a doubt. But he's far from perfect.

    His lack of commitment on Touch ID was bad, for sure. As were his predictions about iPhone X launch date. And I have no idea where the kooky "two OLED displays to make up one 5.8-inch uniform panel" idea came from. His sources had the screen right and then went off the rails at some point.
    For the 5.15' usable area rumor, I suspect this was because Touch ID was planned initally. 

    Off topic: I am really concering the effect of current iPhone apps on iPhone X, will it be just like the 5.15' usable area theory, with black bar below the app? But I can't find a definite answer on this. Can Appleinsider ask Apple about this? As I may delay my purchase plan if it's just like the transition to iPhone 5.
  • Reply 25 of 61
    tkwlee said:
    nhughes said:
    I really don't think calling a 5.8-inch OLED screen size back in March of 2016 was a lucky guess. Nor were his reports on the Face ID technology, or the premium materials used for iPhone X, or wireless charging and glass backs on all three models, or fast USB3 charging. Those reports were accurate and consistent, and usually well before any other supply chain leaks. Kuo does have very good sources in Apple's supply chain, without a doubt. But he's far from perfect.

    His lack of commitment on Touch ID was bad, for sure. As were his predictions about iPhone X launch date. And I have no idea where the kooky "two OLED displays to make up one 5.8-inch uniform panel" idea came from. His sources had the screen right and then went off the rails at some point.
    For the 5.15' usable area rumor, I suspect this was because Touch ID was planned initally. 

    Off topic: I am really concering the effect of current iPhone apps on iPhone X, will it be just like the 5.15' usable area theory, with black bar below the app? But I can't find a definite answer on this. Can Appleinsider ask Apple about this? As I may delay my purchase plan if it's just like the transition to iPhone 5.
    Legacy apps not yet designed for iPhone X will render letterboxed.


  • Reply 26 of 61
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,333member
    eightzero said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Nope. iPhone 8/8+ are the last implementation of TouchID. FaceID is The (Sole) Future. 
    Did you and Sog do a mind swap? You made an unsubstantiated, absolute statement—one that even excludes some sort of iPhone 9 SE or whatever coming out after the iPhone 8 series with Touch ID—and stated his comment as an opinion and then backed it up with an counter argument.
    sog35 said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Disagree.

    The portrait mode for iPhone7 was the first step to make FaceID a reality.  So Apple has been working on FaceID for at least 3 years.

    TouchID under the screen is not as great as people think. If the screen gets even minor scratches you are SCREWED. The entire screen needs to be sapphire.
    Wasn't the technology to be used transparent to such things because it's ultrasonic?
  • Reply 27 of 61
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,333member

    nhughes said:
    Soli said:
    nhughes said:
    Soli said:
    What's wrong with his statement? He didn't state that he knows for sure that there would be nothing special for the 10th anniversary, only that he'd guess that it won't. His assumption was incorrect. He also didn't think that "iPhone ten" would be better over "iPhone Ecks," and he promptly pointed that out after it was revealed. So long as opinions are stated as such, especially if there's a detailed explanation as to why you believe that to be the case, then I see no issue with a blogger stating an opinion.
    Zero problem with him stating his opinion, of course. But he's a high profile dude who has been known to blur the lines between predictions and inside information. And despite the fact that he sometimes delves into the rumor mill himself (see his incorrect Series 3 redesign claim), he's still in Apple's good graces, with Schiller and Federighi appearing on his podcast numerous times.

    Still, credit to Gruber for putting his neck out there and, as I said in the article, owning up to it when his predictions were wrong. The point of this article was not to pick on anyone, just to give an honest summary of sources of multiple rumors leading into yesterday's event and how they fared.
    I didn't think you were picking on anyone.

    He is high-profile, but I can't say he blurs the lines because he seems to be very clear when he's been given some inside information, when it's an educated guess, and even it's a general desire. I'd even argue that he needs to reign in his reasoning a bit as they can be a little longwinded, but at the same time he clearly thinking through the reasons, even if he's making erroneous assumptions.
    When making guesses, he occasionally says things like "If I knew anything about this (and I have a very good track record of knowing these things)," which suggests to me that someone is potentially feeding him information. But of course we don't really know because he's coy about how he presents it.

    He has also gone on the attack over the years on rumor reporting despite the fact that he participates in it (he got into a twitter feud with 9to5mac over the weekend over the iOS 11 GM leak, he has been taking pot shots at Gurman/Bloomberg for awhile now for being late on scoops, there was the Dan Lyons feud years ago, and don't even get me started on the stuff he's written about us over the years). I've got no problem with the dude, but he has his circle of favored Apple media for sure.
    Only after you mention it I seem to recall some negative comments toward DED. Regardless, your point is noted.
    nhughes
  • Reply 28 of 61
    eightzero said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Nope. iPhone 8/8+ are the last implementation of TouchID. FaceID is The (Sole) Future. 
    Given the costs associated with edge-to-edge displays, as well as user familiarity with (and, in some cases, preference for) the home button, I would guess that we will be getting new iPhones with home buttons for at least a few years.

    Consider that the iPhone 6s lineup, now two years old, is still being sold new by Apple. Sure, maybe it's to hit a price point... but I think it's also to offer a jumbo-sized phone with headphone jack.

    Also consider: Apple continued to sell new-in-box legacy non-Retina MacBook Pros with spinning disc drives in its stores until June of 2016. You read that right, June of 2016.

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/16/06/20/apple-pulls-legacy-non-retina-macbook-pro-from-retail-store-displays

    Apple sells more iPhones with home buttons in a single quarter than they would sell MacBook Pros in 15 years. If transitions on the Mac take that long, you can believe legacy iPhone designs will hang around for a few years.
    edited September 2017
  • Reply 29 of 61
    Soli said:

    nhughes said:
    Soli said:
    nhughes said:
    Soli said:
    What's wrong with his statement? He didn't state that he knows for sure that there would be nothing special for the 10th anniversary, only that he'd guess that it won't. His assumption was incorrect. He also didn't think that "iPhone ten" would be better over "iPhone Ecks," and he promptly pointed that out after it was revealed. So long as opinions are stated as such, especially if there's a detailed explanation as to why you believe that to be the case, then I see no issue with a blogger stating an opinion.
    Zero problem with him stating his opinion, of course. But he's a high profile dude who has been known to blur the lines between predictions and inside information. And despite the fact that he sometimes delves into the rumor mill himself (see his incorrect Series 3 redesign claim), he's still in Apple's good graces, with Schiller and Federighi appearing on his podcast numerous times.

    Still, credit to Gruber for putting his neck out there and, as I said in the article, owning up to it when his predictions were wrong. The point of this article was not to pick on anyone, just to give an honest summary of sources of multiple rumors leading into yesterday's event and how they fared.
    I didn't think you were picking on anyone.

    He is high-profile, but I can't say he blurs the lines because he seems to be very clear when he's been given some inside information, when it's an educated guess, and even it's a general desire. I'd even argue that he needs to reign in his reasoning a bit as they can be a little longwinded, but at the same time he clearly thinking through the reasons, even if he's making erroneous assumptions.
    When making guesses, he occasionally says things like "If I knew anything about this (and I have a very good track record of knowing these things)," which suggests to me that someone is potentially feeding him information. But of course we don't really know because he's coy about how he presents it.

    He has also gone on the attack over the years on rumor reporting despite the fact that he participates in it (he got into a twitter feud with 9to5mac over the weekend over the iOS 11 GM leak, he has been taking pot shots at Gurman/Bloomberg for awhile now for being late on scoops, there was the Dan Lyons feud years ago, and don't even get me started on the stuff he's written about us over the years). I've got no problem with the dude, but he has his circle of favored Apple media for sure.
    Only after you mention it I seem to recall some negative comments toward DED. Regardless, your point is noted.
    Yeah, he's never come after me, but he's taken a few shots at Dan. To fe fair, Dan puts himself out there a little more than I do.
  • Reply 30 of 61
    Do we know for sure if third party apps will be able to use the entire screen?  I remember there being something in early code that referenced a resolution multiple that was 16:9 and formed the basis for the 5.15" active and .65" function bar.  All the videos of apps I've seen so far appear to be the ones that come with iOS 11 and would likely feature deep integration into the operating system.
  • Reply 31 of 61
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,333member
    78Bandit said:
    Do we know for sure if third party apps will be able to use the entire screen?  I remember there being something in early code that referenced a resolution multiple that was 16:9 and formed the basis for the 5.15" active and .65" function bar.  All the videos of apps I've seen so far appear to be the ones that come with iOS 11 and would likely feature deep integration into the operating system.
    Yes, but they're very strict about how they wish you to use it.

  • Reply 32 of 61
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.


    From years of working in Product development, I can see a parallel development path, but at some point when Apple provide to itself Face ID was working all work on the Touch ID in the screen stopped. Remember what Steve Job said, You know you are making the hard decisions when you decide not to work on an idea even when you know it is a good idea. It is hard to say no to good ideas.

    Anyway the decision to go with Face ID was made a long time ago, it was not done 6 months ago as the rumor makers wanted people to think.

    Today I hardly use my phone for Apple Pay, I use the watch. Reason being I still have the issue of hitting the home key when I go to use Apple Pay before it read and it unlocks the phone verse just doing Apple Pay.



    radarthekat
  • Reply 33 of 61
    78Bandit said:
    Do we know for sure if third party apps will be able to use the entire screen?  I remember there being something in early code that referenced a resolution multiple that was 16:9 and formed the basis for the 5.15" active and .65" function bar.  All the videos of apps I've seen so far appear to be the ones that come with iOS 11 and would likely feature deep integration into the operating system.
    Apps can (and are encouraged to) take up the full display. The user guidelines have certain rules about preferred touch/non-touch areas. For example, the top (notch) and bottom are discouraged for touch use so users can access the edge swipes more easily.

    If an app needs to use the full screen with edge gestures, Apple offers developers a "swipe twice" feature for invoking multitasking/home. However, the video explaining this explicitly says that this feature should only be utilized in rare, necessary circumstances.

    Basically, Apple wants content to use the full screen, but they only want you to interact with said content toward the center of the screen.
  • Reply 34 of 61
    sog35 said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Disagree.

    The portrait mode for iPhone7 was the first step to make FaceID a reality.  So Apple has been working on FaceID for at least 3 years.

    TouchID under the screen is not as great as people think. If the screen gets even minor scratches you are SCREWED. The entire screen needs to be sapphire.


    Thus the reason Apple invested in GTAT and then dumped on the idea once they realize they could not get enough Sapphire. This is why Apple bought the company who made kinect for Microsoft. Once this decision was made this was the direction Apple was heading in.
  • Reply 35 of 61
    nhughes said:
    eightzero said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Nope. iPhone 8/8+ are the last implementation of TouchID. FaceID is The (Sole) Future. 
    Given the costs associated with edge-to-edge displays, as well as user familiarity with (and, in some cases, preference for) the home button, I would guess that we will be getting new iPhones with home buttons for at least a few years.

    Consider that the iPhone 6s lineup, now two years old, is still being sold new by Apple. Sure, maybe it's to hit a price point... but I think it's also to offer a jumbo-sized phone with headphone jack.

    Also consider: Apple continued to sell new-in-box legacy non-Retina MacBook Pros with spinning disc drives in its stores until June of 2016. You read that right, June of 2016.

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/16/06/20/apple-pulls-legacy-non-retina-macbook-pro-from-retail-store-displays

    Apple sells more iPhones with home buttons in a single quarter than they would sell MacBook Pros in 15 years. If transitions on the Mac take that long, you can believe legacy iPhone designs will hang around for a few years.

    I agree touch ID is going to be around for at least 3 or 4 more years, Especial as long as 5SE or it derivative is around. The horse power and optical sensors needed they are not going to put in all the products. I expect to see the X derivatives to be the only product with Face ID for a while and it will show up in the MacBook Pro at some point and then the Ipad Pro. I can see touch ID staying around.
    nhughes
  • Reply 36 of 61
    anomeanome Posts: 954member

    I'd just like to take the opportunity to address the accuracy of my predictions.

    Firstly, I believe the sudden increase of prices in the mythological creatures market, along with some late lobbying by the WWF prevented Apple from using unicorn horn or other unicorn-derived products in their phones. My sources tell me Jony Ive has taken this somewhat personally, and retreated to his totally white room while he comes to terms with it.

    Secondly, I understand that the Personal Protection Force-Field I predicted actually interfered with the FaceID sensors, and so was dropped at the last minute. Plans are still on track to introduce it in a future phone, once they overcome this minor problem.

    I'm already looking at the possibilities for next year's phones, and I'm hearing very promising talk about incorporating a personal wish-fairy into Siri, to make all your dreams come true - within reason, of course.

    radarthekat
  • Reply 37 of 61
    maestro64 said:
    nhughes said:
    eightzero said:
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:

    After seeing Apple's implementation of Face ID, the touch ID was never in the plans neither was the idea of touch ID in the display. If this works as well as they claim people will not have issue with Face ID and Touch ID would have been redundant. As we know there will be some use cases where Face ID will not work, as Touch ID does not work in all use case, i.e. wet fingers or wearing gloves. I am assuming Apple will still allow for a pass code for when Face ID will not work.

    I don't get that impression. I can see how Touch ID behind the screen, if feasible, would be a great addition to the iPhone X. (and future models). As they stated during the event but they played off, if you have a genetic similarity to someone the 1:1000000 chance of a random person unlocking your device drops considerably. I think something along the lines of "using a passcode" was stated.

    For Apple Pay, imagine having the option to use both. In terms of security, two convenient biometrics are better than one.
    Nope. iPhone 8/8+ are the last implementation of TouchID. FaceID is The (Sole) Future. 
    Given the costs associated with edge-to-edge displays, as well as user familiarity with (and, in some cases, preference for) the home button, I would guess that we will be getting new iPhones with home buttons for at least a few years.

    Consider that the iPhone 6s lineup, now two years old, is still being sold new by Apple. Sure, maybe it's to hit a price point... but I think it's also to offer a jumbo-sized phone with headphone jack.

    Also consider: Apple continued to sell new-in-box legacy non-Retina MacBook Pros with spinning disc drives in its stores until June of 2016. You read that right, June of 2016.

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/16/06/20/apple-pulls-legacy-non-retina-macbook-pro-from-retail-store-displays

    Apple sells more iPhones with home buttons in a single quarter than they would sell MacBook Pros in 15 years. If transitions on the Mac take that long, you can believe legacy iPhone designs will hang around for a few years.

    I agree touch ID is going to be around for at least 3 or 4 more years, Especial as long as 5SE or it derivative is around. The horse power and optical sensors needed they are not going to put in all the products. I expect to see the X derivatives to be the only product with Face ID for a while and it will show up in the MacBook Pro at some point and then the Ipad Pro. I can see touch ID staying around.
    You think Face ID will be in the MacBook Pro before the iPad? Considering Touch ID just came to the MacBook Pro in late 2016 (and isn't even on the 12-inch MacBook yet), I'd vote iPad first. In fact, as I noted in the last section of this piece, there are rumors about an edge-to-edge OLED iPad coming as soon as 2018. You can bet your bottom dollar that if the bezels are further reduced and the home button is ditched on an upcoming iPad, it will also support Face ID.

    Which beckons the question, as iPad Pro prices continue to creep higher and higher: Would anyone pay $1500 for a 13.5-inch OLED iPad?

    (slowly raises hand)
  • Reply 38 of 61
    SoliSoli Posts: 7,333member
    nhughes said:
    Which beckons the question, as iPad Pro prices continue to creep higher and higher: Would anyone pay $1500 for a 13.5-inch OLED iPad?

    (slowly raises hand)
    Will that happen soon? It sure doesn't seem that way with all the stated yield issues with OLED.
  • Reply 39 of 61
    anomeanome Posts: 954member
    Soli said:
    nhughes said:
    Which beckons the question, as iPad Pro prices continue to creep higher and higher: Would anyone pay $1500 for a 13.5-inch OLED iPad?

    (slowly raises hand)
    Will that happen soon? It sure doesn't seem that way with all the stated yield issues with OLED.
    Yeah, US$1500 seems a bit cheap for 13.5" OLED. I'll stop short of saying it would be a good deal, but I certainly wouldn't expect them to bring it in under that price without compromising somewhere else.
  • Reply 40 of 61
    Soli said:
    nhughes said:
    Which beckons the question, as iPad Pro prices continue to creep higher and higher: Would anyone pay $1500 for a 13.5-inch OLED iPad?

    (slowly raises hand)
    Will that happen soon? It sure doesn't seem that way with all the stated yield issues with OLED.
    Ming-Chi Kuo said to expect a redesigned iPad *as soon as* 2018, so take that for whatever it's worth. It was something of an offhanded comment, so I don't place too much stock in it.

    Given the limited size of the iPad market relative to the iPhone, I'd say it's at least possible that such an update arrives next year (certainly Apple would like to if the OLED situation drastically improves), but still very highly unlikely.

    At the very least, I would hope that the 12.9-inch iPad Pro gets the new slimmer bezel design of the 10.5-inch model come 2018. Only question is whether Apple would use the smaller bezels for a bigger 13+ inch display, or stick with 12.9 inches and cut down the weight and size.
    edited September 2017
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