With iPhone X imminent, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus selling close to what an 'iPhone 7s' wo...

Posted:
in iPhone
New data collated from the retail chain suggests that the iPhone 8 Plus outsold the iPhone 8 in September, with the pair grabbing 10 and 8 percent of total U.S. iPhone sales across the entirety of the third calendar quarter, with the pair only available for eight days of the measurement period.




In a report seen by AppleInsider, Consumer Intelligence Research Partners has examined the retail chain in the United States, and are seeing expectedly soft sales of the iPhone 8, likely in anticipation of the iPhone X. The company notes that the share of total sales make the iPhone 8 family release look more like an "s" model -- but this also appears to be by Apple's design.

"It seems when Apple announced the the forthcoming iPhone X, it changed the market dynamic, and probably depressed demand for the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus," said CIRP co-founder Mike Levin. "Both the newly reduced-price iPhone 7 and 7 Plus and older iPhone models continue to see strong demand."

Lewin believes that rather than buying the iPhone 8, that prospective buyers in the third calendar quarter bought existing models -- or decided to wait for the iPhone X.

For comparison, CIRP notes that the iPhone 6 family garnered 46 percent of sales in 11 days of sales, the iPhone 6s had 24 percent of sales with 5 days of sales, and the iPhone 7 collected 43 percent of sales in 14 days. However, CIRP did not note in its study the number of days that the phone was available in the respective launch quarter.

Correcting for each model's entire availability period, the iPhone 6 family collected 4.2 percent per day of availability, the iPhone 6s saw 4.8 percent, and the iPhone 7 collected 3.1 percent. The iPhone 8 family, similarly corrected, comes out to 2.25 percent -- but is the only model of the four under pressure from a higher-end model at launch.

"We see evidence of waiting," said CIRP co-founder Josh Lowitz. "While it's a little early to know, it appears that this even lower share relative to that earlier S' model probably resulted from some buyers delaying a purchase, we think in anticipation of the new iPhone X."

CIRP based its findings on its survey of 500 US Apple customers that purchased an iPhone, iPad, or Mac in the US in July through September 2017 period.

Apple's iPhone X debuted on Sept. 12 and has a 5.8-inch Super Retina OLED display, the A11 Bionic processor, a 3D-sensing TrueDepth camera at the core of the Face ID technology. The device ships Nov. 3, and starts at $999 without any promotions.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 40
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,164member
    Regarding Apple's choice of phones this year Bloomberg has a somewhat interesting take on it. One point I was not aware of: Taiwan requires companies to post monthly sales figures, which is where some of these estimates of phone build numbers probably come from, at least in part. 
    https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-10-23/apple-losing-its-supply-chain-mojo-is-a-major-threat
    edited October 2017
  • Reply 2 of 40
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,663member
    In other words:  Duh.  


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 40
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    sdw2001 said:
    In other words:  Duh.  


    Yup. 

    I’m waiting to see what the iPhoneX is like before buying the X, the 8, or staying with what I’ve got.  
    ben20watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,254administrator
    gatorguy said:
    Regarding Apple's choice of phones this year Bloomberg has a somewhat interesting take on it. One point I was not aware of: Taiwan requires companies to post monthly sales figures, which is where some of these estimates of phone build numbers probably come from, at least in part. 
    https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-10-23/apple-losing-its-supply-chain-mojo-is-a-major-threat
    Yeah- but. Supplier's fortunes aren't tied exclusively to Apple. The author of the Bloomberg piece assumes a direct correlation between the two as an underpinning to his argument and concern.

    Yeah, there's a connection, but it's not as direct as assumed, and the larger industry trends and slowdowns are the issue, not specifically Apple.
    edited October 2017 GG1magman1979caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 40
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,164member
    gatorguy said:
    Regarding Apple's choice of phones this year Bloomberg has a somewhat interesting take on it. One point I was not aware of: Taiwan requires companies to post monthly sales figures, which is where some of these estimates of phone build numbers probably come from, at least in part. 
    https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-10-23/apple-losing-its-supply-chain-mojo-is-a-major-threat
    Yeah- but. Supplier's fortunes aren't tied exclusively to Apple. The author of the Bloomberg piece assumes a direct correlation between the two as an underpinning to his argument and concern.

    Yeah, there's a connection, but it's not as direct as assumed, and the larger industry trends and slowdowns are the issue, not specifically Apple.
    Excellent mention Mike. 
    cali
  • Reply 6 of 40
    And here’s 9to5Mac’s headline for the same data.

    CIRP data suggests iPhone 8 selling worse than an ‘S’ model
    asdasdbb-15
  • Reply 7 of 40
    Except Apple didn’t release a 7s. They released an 8 and the X, so we don’t know how a 7S would have sold. 🙄
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 40

    gatorguy said:
    Regarding Apple's choice of phones this year Bloomberg has a somewhat interesting take on it. One point I was not aware of: Taiwan requires companies to post monthly sales figures, which is where some of these estimates of phone build numbers probably come from, at least in part. 
    https://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2017-10-23/apple-losing-its-supply-chain-mojo-is-a-major-threat
    Yeah- but. Supplier's fortunes aren't tied exclusively to Apple. The author of the Bloomberg piece assumes a direct correlation between the two as an underpinning to his argument and concern.

    Yeah, there's a connection, but it's not as direct as assumed, and the larger industry trends and slowdowns are the issue, not specifically Apple.
    This reminds me of when financial analysts kept using AT&T and Verizon earnings calls as a gauge on iPhone sales. Then they finally figured out that Apple has a lot more iPhone uses than AT&T and Verizon customers.
    edited October 2017 cali
  • Reply 9 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,254administrator
    And here’s 9to5Mac’s headline for the same data.

    CIRP data suggests iPhone 8 selling worse than an ‘S’ model
    They're not wrong, but it isn't very precise.
  • Reply 10 of 40
    Rayz2016 said:
    sdw2001 said:
    In other words:  Duh.  


    Yup. 

    I’m waiting to see what the iPhoneX is like before buying the X, the 8, or staying with what I’ve got.  
    Google Pixel 2 is flawed by screen burn in. OLED defendents claimed that that was an old issue already resolved. But a recent phone with presumably good tech still presents OLED burn in.

    So I wouldn’t take the risk, even with Apple and would stay with the good old LCD. I bought my iPhone 8 Plus a couple of days ago and TrueTone is wonderful.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 40
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,244member
    Except Apple didn’t release a 7s. They released an 8 and the X, so we don’t know how a 7S would have sold. 🙄
    Sure they did - it's just called the iPhone 8. 

    As far as the 'Duh' comment goes - I totally agree. There is very little difference between the 6s, the 7 and the 8 (headphone jack, waterproofing, some incremental changes in the camera and now wireless charging) to excite most people about upgrading. When you dangle the iPhone X on top of that, who can blame people for waiting?
    retrogustocali
  • Reply 12 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,254administrator
    Rayz2016 said:
    sdw2001 said:
    In other words:  Duh.  


    Yup. 

    I’m waiting to see what the iPhoneX is like before buying the X, the 8, or staying with what I’ve got.  
    Google Pixel 2 is flawed by screen burn in. OLED defendents claimed that that was an old issue already resolved. But a recent phone with presumably good tech still presents OLED burn in.

    So I wouldn’t take the risk, even with Apple and would stay with the good old LCD. I bought my iPhone 8 Plus a couple of days ago and TrueTone is wonderful.
    The 2XL with the burn-in uses Plastic OLED, versus AMOLED. We'll see what Apple's using -- but I suspect it's the latter.
    king editor the gratebb-15caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 40
    Rayz2016 said:
    sdw2001 said:
    In other words:  Duh.  


    Yup. 

    I’m waiting to see what the iPhoneX is like before buying the X, the 8, or staying with what I’ve got.  
    Google Pixel 2 is flawed by screen burn in. OLED defendents claimed that that was an old issue already resolved. But a recent phone with presumably good tech still presents OLED burn in.

    So I wouldn’t take the risk, even with Apple and would stay with the good old LCD. I bought my iPhone 8 Plus a couple of days ago and TrueTone is wonderful.
    The 2XL with the burn-in uses Plastic OLED, versus AMOLED. We'll see what Apple's using -- but I suspect it's the latter.
    Isn’t POLED and AMOLED just the names LG and Samsung use for their display tech?
  • Reply 14 of 40
    MplsP said:
    Except Apple didn’t release a 7s. They released an 8 and the X, so we don’t know how a 7S would have sold. 🙄
    Sure they did - it's just called the iPhone 8. 

    As far as the 'Duh' comment goes - I totally agree. There is very little difference between the 6s, the 7 and the 8 (headphone jack, waterproofing, some incremental changes in the camera and now wireless charging) to excite most people about upgrading. When you dangle the iPhone X on top of that, who can blame people for waiting?
    The A11 Bionic is the difference. It is not an incremental change, it is a substantial jump forward and the only jump since four years after A7 which was a jump to 64-bit. With a 7 you can go further at most one year, but 8 series will support you at least four years.
    caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 40
    Wow! In only eight days of the quarter.

    I was thinking the iPhone 8 looked a bit 'dated' w/ the same big chin and brow of the 6's and 7's. I was thinking it was a mistake to show off the X so soon. Well, what do I know?

    Don't get me wrong, the 8's are beautiful devices and the wireless charging is, for me a reason to upgrade. My experience w/ my AppleWatch just being able to lay it on the Apple white charger is sooooo convenient compared to having to plug in my SE, AirPods, MacBook and iPad.

    Anecdotal: My GF and I are taking a long weekend in the cool mountains, staying in a cabin and hiking and running the trails....she has my old MacBook Pro, an iPad both left at home. She only brought her iPhone 6 and is doing everything on it. I'm getting her the Plus b/c of this. :)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 40
    Rayz2016 said:
    sdw2001 said:
    In other words:  Duh.  


    Yup. 

    I’m waiting to see what the iPhoneX is like before buying the X, the 8, or staying with what I’ve got.  
    Google Pixel 2 is flawed by screen burn in. OLED defendents claimed that that was an old issue already resolved. But a recent phone with presumably good tech still presents OLED burn in.

    So I wouldn’t take the risk, even with Apple and would stay with the good old LCD. I bought my iPhone 8 Plus a couple of days ago and TrueTone is wonderful.
    The 2XL with the burn-in uses Plastic OLED, versus AMOLED. We'll see what Apple's using -- but I suspect it's the latter.
    I am not familiar with display tech but isn’t the burn in issue related to diodes themselves, rather than coating/layering?
  • Reply 17 of 40
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,244member
    MplsP said:
    Except Apple didn’t release a 7s. They released an 8 and the X, so we don’t know how a 7S would have sold. 🙄
    Sure they did - it's just called the iPhone 8. 

    As far as the 'Duh' comment goes - I totally agree. There is very little difference between the 6s, the 7 and the 8 (headphone jack, waterproofing, some incremental changes in the camera and now wireless charging) to excite most people about upgrading. When you dangle the iPhone X on top of that, who can blame people for waiting?
    The A11 Bionic is the difference. It is not an incremental change, it is a substantial jump forward and the only jump since four years after A7 which was a jump to 64-bit. With a 7 you can go further at most one year, but 8 series will support you at least four years.
    True, I forgot about that, but very few people were actually limited by the processor before. The A9 in my 6s is doing great. The home screen may open 200ms faster on the 8, but I'm not going to pay $700 for that. I suspect many people are in the same boat. In years past 2 model years made a huge difference in features and performance. Not so much any more.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 18 of 40
    Rayz2016 said:
    sdw2001 said:
    In other words:  Duh.  


    Yup. 

    I’m waiting to see what the iPhoneX is like before buying the X, the 8, or staying with what I’ve got.  
    Google Pixel 2 is flawed by screen burn in. OLED defendents claimed that that was an old issue already resolved. But a recent phone with presumably good tech still presents OLED burn in.

    So I wouldn’t take the risk, even with Apple and would stay with the good old LCD. I bought my iPhone 8 Plus a couple of days ago and TrueTone is wonderful.
    The 2XL with the burn-in uses Plastic OLED, versus AMOLED. We'll see what Apple's using -- but I suspect it's the latter.
    Isn’t POLED and AMOLED just the names LG and Samsung use for their display tech?

    It is, but there is a huge difference in the maturity of the display technology deployed by those 2 companies. LG has started with the OLED display technology for smartphones only this year. All of their flagship phones until last year used LCD technology. Samsung has been using OLED for lot of years and faced burn-in in earlier years and resolved the issues and matured the technology to what it is now. So there is an important distinction to be made, while talking about OLED which was NOT made by @macplusplus. Mike was correct in pointing out the differences. The chances of iPhone X suffering from burn-in should be close to Nil because Apple chose Samsung to manufacture the panels for them who are at a different level in this technology.
    bb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 40
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    Except Apple didn’t release a 7s. They released an 8 and the X, so we don’t know how a 7S would have sold. 🙄
    Sure they did - it's just called the iPhone 8. 

    As far as the 'Duh' comment goes - I totally agree. There is very little difference between the 6s, the 7 and the 8 (headphone jack, waterproofing, some incremental changes in the camera and now wireless charging) to excite most people about upgrading. When you dangle the iPhone X on top of that, who can blame people for waiting?
    The A11 Bionic is the difference. It is not an incremental change, it is a substantial jump forward and the only jump since four years after A7 which was a jump to 64-bit. With a 7 you can go further at most one year, but 8 series will support you at least four years.
    True, I forgot about that, but very few people were actually limited by the processor before. The A9 in my 6s is doing great. The home screen may open 200ms faster on the 8, but I'm not going to pay $700 for that. I suspect many people are in the same boat. In years past 2 model years made a huge difference in features and performance. Not so much any more.
    You don’t pay $700 for 200 ms gain, you pay that for 6 cores, Apple GPU, Neural Engine, OIS and better image signal processor, wireless charging, TrueTone display, color accuracy... Not all of these can be summarized as 200 ms.
    bb-15caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 40
    What’s the end of service life of OLED on phones? Does the organic part decays even not in use? A concern but won’t stop me getting the iPhone X.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.