'Hey Siri' may come to iMac Pro with rumored inclusion of A10 Fusion co-processor

Posted:
in macOS edited November 2017
The iMac Pro may have an A10 Fusion processor running it's own iOS, called BridgeOS, to handle some functions -- notably 'Hey Siri'.




Guilherme Rambo and Stephen Troughton-Smith have been exploring macOS and have found 'Hey Siri' functionality in the code base with support for multiple user accounts, just as macOS has long supported user switching.

Looks like the iMac Pro's ARM coprocessor is arm64 Seems to handle the macOS boot & security process, as expected; iMac Pro lets Apple experiment with tighter control without the rest of the userbase freaking out. More info & download here: https://t.co/wmbNeVSEZX

-- Steve Troughton-Smith (@stroughtonsmith)


If the accounts are correct, It looks as though the ARM coprocessor takes over the boot process, security, and the FaceTime camera. It also appears that the inclusion of the A10 Fusion allows the iMac Pro to accept the voice command 'Hey Siri' rather than requiring the click in macOS on the Siri icon or keystroke to prompt Siri.

The "Hey Siri" setup on macOS is identical to the one on iOS, but it's implemented with regular AppKit, there's no magical UIKit port or UXKit being used pic.twitter.com/lhuga3dA7y

-- Guilherme Rambo (@_inside)


"Hey Siri" on macOS depends on the presence of a BridgeOS device (A10 coprocessor).

-- Guilherme Rambo (@_inside)


"Hey Siri" enrollment model from my testing yesterday was stored in ~/Library/VoiceTrigger/SAT. Means it's going to support multiple users.

-- Guilherme Rambo (@_inside)


This doesn't mean necessarily that Siri will understand multiple users speaking while logged into one macOS user account. But, it may mean that if a user has multiple accounts on a Mac, they should be able to fast user switch between them and have the iMac Pro recognize 'Hey Siri' for each of them.

It is unclear if this functionality will need a coprocessor like the A10 Fusion to be implemented in other machines.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 92
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,682member
    1) I think bridgeOS is also what Apple calls the OS on their T1 chip for the Touch Bar, Touch ID, and Apple Pay in their MacBook Pros.


    2) I'm curious why the 'B' is being capitalized when all other Apple OSes have the first letter lowercase.

    3) A10 seems like overkill for the stated functionality, and with FaceTime mentioned I hope that this means the iMac Pro will also include Face ID.

    4) Is this still launching next month?
  • Reply 2 of 92
    Soli said:
    1) I think bridgeOS is also what Apple calls the OS on their T1 chip for the Touch Bar, Touch ID, and Apple Pay in their MacBook Pros.


    2) I'm curious why the 'B' is being capitalized when all other Apple OSes have the first letter lowercase.

    3) A10 seems like overkill for the stated functionality, and with FaceTime mentioned I hope that this means the iMac Pro will also include Face ID.

    4) Is this still launching next month?
    Since the A10 will also be used in the HomePod I’m guessing it’s easier to use that fabrication already in place rather than have two different lines. Too bad it’s not the A11 with its new Apple GPU and the new Neural Engine. 
  • Reply 3 of 92
    I always find it easier and quicker to just do a search using a few keys than talking to a digital assistant which works once out of seven attempts. We don't need Siri, stop trying to make us all lazy and lame. 
    GeorgeBMacking editor the grateaylkrandominternetperson
  • Reply 4 of 92
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,041member
    The A10 fusion chip is cheap compared to the Intel chips.  The iMac pro margin can easily handle it.  

    Apple could be working towards direct running of iOS apps on OS X for development or plain ol' operation.  Your Mac could become your iPad or your phone... just another iOS device, while still being a Mac.  

    At the same time, Apple could be testing how well the ARM runs pro-style apps or OSX.  If the A10 chip is handling the boot process,  then the next step is booting to the OS of choice, be it OSX, Windows, or (dun dun dunnnn...) iOS.  

    Remember that Apple was running OSX on intel for FIVE YEARS before they ANNOUNCED the switch to Intel.  We could have ARM-based Macs in that time or less from now.  

    It sounds nuts. N-V-T-S, nuts.  But it is plausible.  
    bb-15ElArchitectwatto_cobratenthousandthingskamilton
  • Reply 5 of 92
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,081member
    I usually disable Siri on the Mac...its just too useless. I don't see where it really does much of anything. 

    I think it would be cool to see the A10 or A11 in the next MacBook and/or MacBook Pro along side the Intel CPU. It could run the OS doing basic things and then when power is really needed it kicks in the Intel CPU. That would quite a feat of engineering though. There's a lot of software engineering that needs to take place to make something like that work reliably. 
    edited November 2017 GeorgeBMacphilboogiemwhite
  • Reply 6 of 92
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,174member
    Great now I'll be able to set a timer for 15 minutes when I'm on my computer.   didn't know I even needed that. </s>
    king editor the grate
  • Reply 7 of 92
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,682member
    spice-boy said:
    I always find it easier and quicker to just do a search using a few keys than talking to a digital assistant which works once out of seven attempts. We don't need Siri, stop trying to make us all lazy and lame. 
    1) Voice commands can be much faster than typing, especially if it's not something that can be typed quickly. Here's an example of an equation that Siri on the Mac will complete in the time it takes me to say it, which is less than the time it takes to bringup the Calculator app from Calculator, which doesn't even include typing it in.



    2) Laziness is outright denying the utility of a technology and denigrating anyone that uses it because you can't see how it can be useful to you.

    3) You've completely ignored those who have visual and motor disables that may find an always-on digital voice assistant very helpful. But, you know, they're just lazy¡
    edited November 2017 philboogiebb-15caliLordeHawkStrangeDaysElArchitectalandailwatto_cobraracerhomieMacPro
  • Reply 8 of 92
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,682member
    k2kw said:
    Great now I'll be able to set a timer for 15 minutes when I'm on my computer.   didn't know I even needed that. </s>
    That's not an option with macOS, and I'd be surprised if that comes with the iMac Pro. If you try it will ask you if you want to set a Reminder, instead.
  • Reply 9 of 92
    eriamjh said:
    The A10 fusion chip is cheap compared to the Intel chips.  The iMac pro margin can easily handle it.  

    Apple could be working towards direct running of iOS apps on OS X for development or plain ol' operation.  Your Mac could become your iPad or your phone... just another iOS device, while still being a Mac.  

    At the same time, Apple could be testing how well the ARM runs pro-style apps or OSX.  If the A10 chip is handling the boot process,  then the next step is booting to the OS of choice, be it OSX, Windows, or (dun dun dunnnn...) iOS.  

    Remember that Apple was running OSX on intel for FIVE YEARS before they ANNOUNCED the switch to Intel.  We could have ARM-based Macs in that time or less from now.  

    It sounds nuts. N-V-T-S, nuts.  But it is plausible.  
    Ok, but why would they treat OSX and iOS as separate OS's?   iOS was derived from OSX.   Most of the differences are related to the hardware form (and related i/o) that they run on.  Running two OS's on one machine just isn't what Apple does.  Two messy.   They'll roll them back together -- or more likely just modify OSX as necessary...
    edited November 2017
  • Reply 10 of 92
    Still waiting for on-device parsing..not having to rely on an internet connection. I’d be nice if I can use Siri without an Internet connection. Just to ask to start a timer shouldn’t need an internet connection.
  • Reply 11 of 92
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,357member
    After iPhone/iPad; such function should go fisrt into Macbook Pro laptop. More people can use it. You know, when Apple makes MBP with it's own CPU/GPU/etc; cross iDevices life will be simpler.
  • Reply 12 of 92
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,682member
    eriamjh said:
    The A10 fusion chip is cheap compared to the Intel chips.  The iMac pro margin can easily handle it.  

    Apple could be working towards direct running of iOS apps on OS X for development or plain ol' operation.  Your Mac could become your iPad or your phone... just another iOS device, while still being a Mac.  

    At the same time, Apple could be testing how well the ARM runs pro-style apps or OSX.  If the A10 chip is handling the boot process,  then the next step is booting to the OS of choice, be it OSX, Windows, or (dun dun dunnnn...) iOS.  

    Remember that Apple was running OSX on intel for FIVE YEARS before they ANNOUNCED the switch to Intel.  We could have ARM-based Macs in that time or less from now.  

    It sounds nuts. N-V-T-S, nuts.  But it is plausible.  
    Ok, but why would they treat OSX and iOS as separate OS's?   iOS was derived from OSX.   Most of the differences are related to the hardware form (and related i/o) that they run on.  Running two OS's on one machine just isn't what Apple does.  Two messy.   They'll roll them back together -- or more likely just modify OSX as necessary...
    The UI is the major difference. It’s like saying watchOS is the same as iOS because they both run on ARM. Architecture can change, as Apple has shown many times. There will never be a single install that will work for iPhones and Macs!
    edited November 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 92
    Running two OS's on one machine just isn't what Apple does.  Two messy.
     :D 
    cali
  • Reply 14 of 92
    kruegdude said:
    Soli said:
    1) I think bridgeOS is also what Apple calls the OS on their T1 chip for the Touch Bar, Touch ID, and Apple Pay in their MacBook Pros.


    2) I'm curious why the 'B' is being capitalized when all other Apple OSes have the first letter lowercase.

    3) A10 seems like overkill for the stated functionality, and with FaceTime mentioned I hope that this means the iMac Pro will also include Face ID.

    4) Is this still launching next month?
    Since the A10 will also be used in the HomePod I’m guessing it’s easier to use that fabrication already in place rather than have two different lines. Too bad it’s not the A11 with its new Apple GPU and the new Neural Engine. 
    The HomePod uses the A8, not the A10
    watto_cobraRayz2016
  • Reply 15 of 92
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,081member
    eriamjh said:
    The A10 fusion chip is cheap compared to the Intel chips.  The iMac pro margin can easily handle it.  

    Apple could be working towards direct running of iOS apps on OS X for development or plain ol' operation.  Your Mac could become your iPad or your phone... just another iOS device, while still being a Mac.  

    At the same time, Apple could be testing how well the ARM runs pro-style apps or OSX.  If the A10 chip is handling the boot process,  then the next step is booting to the OS of choice, be it OSX, Windows, or (dun dun dunnnn...) iOS.  

    Remember that Apple was running OSX on intel for FIVE YEARS before they ANNOUNCED the switch to Intel.  We could have ARM-based Macs in that time or less from now.  

    It sounds nuts. N-V-T-S, nuts.  But it is plausible.  
    Ok, but why would they treat OSX and iOS as separate OS's?   iOS was derived from OSX.   Most of the differences are related to the hardware form (and related i/o) that they run on.  Running two OS's on one machine just isn't what Apple does.  Two messy.   They'll roll them back together -- or more likely just modify OSX as necessary...
    Do you really have to ask this question? Seriously? Have you not been paying attention for the past 10 yrs?
    bb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 92
    If this is true (and I can see many, many reasons for them to implement a dedicated "secure" CPU / core as they already do for iOS devices), then I see no reason why HomeKit couldn't finally come to the Mac. If nothing else, it opens the possibility for Siri voice control, and possibly some dedicated 1st party HomeKit app like what exists in iOS today to set up more advanced rules. The benefits are numerous and, long term, I cannot see Apple limiting this to *only* the iMac Pro. There's already precedent for this today as Touch Bar-enabled Macs technically have a dedicated Ax processor running in tandem with the main Intel CPU.

    Until now, there was pretty big concern about macOS, which is a much more open operating system compared to iOS, having any access to home automation, including critical home security devices like smart locks. By offloading this to a secure core, they get rid of that risk and can remove any chance for 3rd party access as well.
    edited November 2017 caliStrangeDayswatto_cobraRayz2016
  • Reply 17 of 92
    Apple can simply incorporate the heart of the iPhone into all Macs. 
    This would greatly increase security on Macs.

    Obviously, it would make it very difficult to create a Hackintosh.
    caliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 92
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    All-in-one (AIO) computers like iMac are a huge aggression to planet Earth. Computers may last for seven years or less, whereas displays may last for more than 20 years.
  • Reply 19 of 92
    SoliSoli Posts: 6,682member
    appex said:
    All-in-one (AIO) computers like iMac are a huge aggression to planet Earth. Computers may last for seven years or less, whereas displays may last for more than 20 years.
    Please shut the fuck up with that nonsense. The number of consumer displays in use from 20 years ago is practically nil and we're not going to give up our notebooks, tablets smartphones, smartwatches, and everything else that comes with a built-in display because you have a problem with an already low-yield device, the iMac.
    kirkgrayStrangeDaysElArchitectsuddenly newtonwatto_cobraentropysroundaboutnowLordeHawkchiarandominternetperson
  • Reply 20 of 92
    It only makes sense that Apple would include the A11 Bionic with Secure Enclave in every Mac to work with Intel processors.

    Only with its own custom chips can Apple insure security in essentially the generic Intel computer guts of every Mac.

    This will give Apple the great option of including Face ID in every Apple Device - Macs, AppleTV, iPhones, iPads, etc. 

    Additionally, Siri and voice recognition can be offloaded onto the A11 Bionic so that Macs can run faster while simultaneously handling voice and other duties.

    Intel Chips historically have been SO SLOW it has been maddening.  Realize that by limiting consumer computers to 4 core chips, Intel chips have not progressed in speed for the past DECADE. Unbelievable.



    edited November 2017 suddenly newtonwatto_cobra
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