Apple enterprise sales channels gearing up, preparing businesses for iMac Pro orders

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited December 2017
AppleInsider has learned that enterprise sales staff within Apple have begun asking long-time clients about what "custom configurations" of the iMac Pro that they may seek, and are making preparations to take orders for the device as soon as this week.




According to multiple sources that AppleInsider has been in contact with for over a decade, but who are not authorized to speak on behalf of the company, emails to "reliable, high-volume customers" have been sent regarding purchases of the iMac Pro. The emails ask about specific needs for the customers, including storage, RAM, GPU needs, and peripheral requirements.

In exchange, Apple salespeople are giving "ballpark prices" for the requests, so the hardware purchasers can prepare the funds for the order, or make arrangements for financing before the end of the week. AppleInsider was unable to source information on price ranges for custom configurations beyond the $4,999 base price that Apple has already announced.





The multiple sources also claimed that Apple will be able to ship "early orders" for both default and some custom configurations before the conclusion of the fiscal quarter and calendar year, qualifying for any applicable tax benefits for the 2017 tax year.

It is unclear how similar this is to the Mac Pro redesign, that was announced in October 2013, and only shipped in very small quantities after Dec. 18, 2013 -- but still technically qualifying as shipped in that year.




The iMac Pro made a brief appearance at the 2017 WWDC. It will feature a 5K display, Vega 56 or 64 Graphics, up to 18-core Xeon processors, up to 4TB of SSD storage, and will start at $4,999 when it ships. International regulatory filings peg one model of the iMac Pro as "A1862" ahead of its release.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    I’d love to have that much power in an iMac, but I just cannot justify spending that much on a desktop anymore. I used to regularly shell out thousands from my own pocket to get the latest Mac just so I could keep up and advance my career but it’s much less important to me now. Still getting so much use out of my iPad Pro!
  • Reply 2 of 28
    I see the iMac Pro as strictly a stop gap to a redesigned Mac Pro. Most high end users really want a system that they can customize and expand for their particular applications and the iMac's expansion is basically limited to almost entirely external devices. I think the iMac Pro is a good machine, although typically expensive, it's appeal is limited by lack of internal expansion options...
    xzudocno42
  • Reply 3 of 28
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,460member
    karmadave said:
    I see the iMac Pro as strictly a stop gap to a redesigned Mac Pro. Most high end users really want a system that they can customize and expand for their particular applications and the iMac's expansion is basically limited to almost entirely external devices. I think the iMac Pro is a good machine, although typically expensive, it's appeal is limited by lack of internal expansion options...
    I don't agree.  Companies will be purchasing these workstations for use by their employees.  They want to put these workstations straight to work to begin generating revenue for them.  They have little desire to open up the cases and swap out internals.  "High End Users" aren't necessarily those that want to do that, but professionals in their field that want the fastest machines around. When those machines no longer serve their purpose, most will not upgrade components.  Their bosses will simply buy them a new, more current machine.  That's how corporate works.

    I "hope" the new Mac Pro is more upgrade-friendly than the prior model, but even then... outside of the basic SSD/RAM upgrades, I don't think most people using the Mac Pro will be swapping internals either.  I'm sure it will be crammed full of Thunderbolt3(x) ports that will let any add-on be simply a matter of plugging it in.  It will be interesting to see what Apple does on their re-visit to the Mac Pro.
    chiapatchythepiratemacplusplusRayz2016StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 28
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 8,880member
    You certainly don’t need that kind of horsepower for general business use. IMHO I see the iMac Pro being for serious number crunching, graphics and design professionals. While I personally am drooling over this machine and could afford it if I stretched the budget it’s way too much power for my personal home use.

    Now if the regular iMac line was offered in space gray or rose gold I would be all over those. My late 2013 27” iMac 14,2 is still going strong and runs High Sierra very well but it will be five years old next year. 
    randominternetpersonxzuwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 28
    ...I've submitted feedback to Apple asking for a more affordable entry config (ram and drive, like the current pro) as well as ideally a silver option to match all the other accessories... I guess we'll know soon enough...
  • Reply 6 of 28
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,215member
    I can't and I'd suspect many others can't make a decision on an iMac Pro until what the next Mac Pro will offer in (I assume) 2018 is known.  
  • Reply 7 of 28
    ...I've submitted feedback to Apple asking for a more affordable entry config (ram and drive, like the current pro) as well as ideally a silver option to match all the other accessories... I guess we'll know soon enough...
    I'm confused.  Aren't you describing the current iMacs?  Entry config, silver to match other accessories... that's just an iMac, which we already have.  $5K for the entry config of the iMac Pro is a lot of money but relatively speaking it's not a lot considering what you're getting. 
    chiabaconstangkirkgrayrandominternetpersonfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 28
    One thing I don't get: Why the upgraded speakers in a "Pro" computer? I guess for graphics persons that play Spotify in the background as they work? I can't imagine a professional video editor using computer speakers in their professional work, and audio engineers...well, they wouldn't be professional if they mixed on computer speakers! (I know, some would use them as secondary or more likely tertiary alt speakers to check a mix, but not as their main near fields...and as that type of tool, you still would not need them to be "upgraded.")
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 9 of 28
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,460member
    coxnvox7 said:
    One thing I don't get: Why the upgraded speakers in a "Pro" computer? I guess for graphics persons that play Spotify in the background as they work? I can't imagine a professional video editor using computer speakers in their professional work, and audio engineers...well, they wouldn't be professional if they mixed on computer speakers! (I know, some would use them as secondary or more likely tertiary alt speakers to check a mix, but not as their main near fields...and as that type of tool, you still would not need them to be "upgraded.")
    I get that the iMac's speakers (even the Pro model) are sufficient for the task at hand I suppose.  For me, the best accessory I got for my iMac were a couple of speakers from AudioEngine and their USB-DAC box to top it off.  The difference between the iMac speakers and my external one are night and day.  

    I would suspect the iMac Pro's speakers are still subject to the laws of physics being in such a confining case.
  • Reply 10 of 28
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,766member
    Sad to say Linux won the server and tinkerer war.  I just hope Apple beefs up the Mac mini soon (not like the last mini update), for those of us who rely on macOS Server.
    Soldering the RAM in the iMac Pro is absolutely disgusting, btw.
    edited December 2017 kirkgray
  • Reply 11 of 28
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,823member
    ...I've submitted feedback to Apple asking for a more affordable entry config (ram and drive, like the current pro) as well as ideally a silver option to match all the other accessories... I guess we'll know soon enough...

    So... a standard iMac then?

    i hope the next gen iMac has the internal cooling structure of the iMac pro. But the RAM and SDD is easy to replace. 
    kirkgraywatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 28
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,089administrator
    cpsro said:
    Sad to say Linux won the server and tinkerer war.  I just hope Apple beefs up the Mac mini soon (not like the last mini update), for those of us who rely on macOS Server.
    Soldering the RAM in the iMac Pro is absolutely disgusting, btw.
    Well, they say that the 21.5-inch model isn't user-replaceable either, but yet, it is socketed just the same.

    That said, I'd prefer a RAM door like in the 27.
    kirkgrayxzuwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 28
    cpsro said:
    Sad to say Linux won the server and tinkerer war.  I just hope Apple beefs up the Mac mini soon (not like the last mini update), for those of us who rely on macOS Server.
    Soldering the RAM in the iMac Pro is absolutely disgusting, btw.
    From the graphics on the Apple UK site it looks like the RAM is socketed.

    kirkgrayStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 28
    From the graphics on the Apple UK site it looks like the RAM is socketed.
    For as “accessible” as it is, it may as well be soldered. You’ll have to take out the entire logic board and fan assembly after removing the screen to be able to replace it.
  • Reply 15 of 28
    ...I've submitted feedback to Apple asking for a more affordable entry config (ram and drive, like the current pro) as well as ideally a silver option to match all the other accessories... I guess we'll know soon enough...
    So . . . basically . . . you requested an iMac labelled ‘iMac Pro.’
  • Reply 16 of 28
    tipootipoo Posts: 1,110member
    cpsro said:
    Sad to say Linux won the server and tinkerer war.  I just hope Apple beefs up the Mac mini soon (not like the last mini update), for those of us who rely on macOS Server.
    Soldering the RAM in the iMac Pro is absolutely disgusting, btw.
    Well, they say that the 21.5-inch model isn't user-replaceable either, but yet, it is socketed just the same.

    That said, I'd prefer a RAM door like in the 27.

    The render video shows socketed RAM as well. Probably right, socketed but just no RAM door, leading to a 21.5 inch iMac scenario where it's possible but recommended you get all you need from the outset. 

    Opening a new iMac is already heart wrenching lol, imagine doing that with the Pro. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 28
    From the graphics on the Apple UK site it looks like the RAM is socketed.
    For as “accessible” as it is, it may as well be soldered. You’ll have to take out the entire logic board and fan assembly after removing the screen to be able to replace it.
    Yuk ... that's like having to remove the motor in a car just to change the oil filter.
    caladanian
  • Reply 18 of 28
    kimberly said:
    From the graphics on the Apple UK site it looks like the RAM is socketed.
    For as “accessible” as it is, it may as well be soldered. You’ll have to take out the entire logic board and fan assembly after removing the screen to be able to replace it.
    Yuk ... that's like having to remove the motor in a car just to change the oil filter.
    It's not like that at all.  The vast majority of iMacs will never have the RAM upgraded and most of those that do will have it done once and early in the product life.

    I'm not saying that Apple shouldn't care about hard or easy it is to add memory, but let's not pretend it's regular maintenance.
    edited December 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 28
    It's not like that at all.  The vast majority of iMacs will never have the RAM upgraded and most of those that do will have it done once and early in the product life.
    Why would you do it early? If you do it, it’s to extend the lifespan at the end of what you’d normally call it over. I guess, sure, you buy the least amount of RAM from Apple and then add your own immediately from a third party (for hundreds and hundreds of dollars cheaper), but that’s also not making a case for inaccessible RAM, either, particularly when Apple doesn’t seem to know how to price the damn stuff.
    edited December 2017
  • Reply 20 of 28
    karmadave said:
    I see the iMac Pro as strictly a stop gap to a redesigned Mac Pro. Most high end users really want a system that they can customize and expand for their particular applications and the iMac's expansion is basically limited to almost entirely external devices. I think the iMac Pro is a good machine, although typically expensive, it's appeal is limited by lack of internal expansion options...
    I disagree with the guess that “most” high end users want an expandable system anymore. Judging by my own desire and Apple’s comments, a lot of pros (the majority of which are running Xcode) are on high end iMacs. My own developer desktop is a fully loaded iMac and it’s been an awesome machine. Plus it takes up essentially no space and is mounted on a VESA arm. And it’s lasted me many years. I had no need to upgrade the video card or RAM, and while I could use more space it’s still fine. It’s almost 7 years old now but thanks to SSD still runs the latest everything. 

    So the idea of another badass iMac doesn’t bother me at all — speed and clean desk space is what I like about them. My days of DIY tinkering are behind me, and I’m clearly not alone in this sentiment. 
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.