Which iMac Pro configuration is right for you?

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited December 2017
If you've got questions about which iMac Pro to get, AppleInsider has answers in a video breaking down the specs of the machine -- and how much it's going to cost you.





Apple on Thursday kicked off sales of the iMac Pro, its first all-in-one professional-grade desktop, packing 8 Intel Xeon processing cores and 32 gigabytes of RAM into the entry-level $4,999 model. The first orders via Apple's website arrive just after Christmas, by Dec. 27.

A completely maxed-out, 18-core late 2017 iMac Pro will set buyers back $13,199 -- and actually ships in early 2018.

If you want to get a higher tiered iMac Pro, we think the best option is Apple's $7,199 midspec model, which packs in a 10 -core processor, Vega 64 graphics with 16 gigabytes of memory, 64 gigabytes of RAM, and a 1-terabyte SSD.

Custom configurations of the iMac Pro include 64 gigabytes of RAM for another $800, or 128 gigabytes for an additional $2,400. A jump to a 2-terabyte SSD is $800, while 4 terabytes costs $2,800.

iMac Pro


Moving up from the base Radeon Pro Vega 56 graphics with 8GB of HBM2 memory to the Vega 64 with 16GB is the least expensive optional upgrade available on the iMac Pro, coming in at $600.

Upgrading the Processor will cost $800 for a 10 core, $1600 for a 12 core, and $2400 for the highest end 18-core CPU. The last two options will require you to wait until late January or February before delivery.

Apple's official app also says the machine will be available for in-store pickup starting Feb. 20

The iMac Pro ships in Space Gray, with matching Lightning cable to charge the included Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad, and Magic Mouse 2. A Space Gray Magic Trackpad 2 is available for sale in conjunction with the unit.

Along with iMac Pro release, Apple has updated Final Cut Pro with new features including editing full-resolution 8K video, and extension of 360-degree VR video support to Motion and Compressor. It also includes updated color correction tools, LUT support, HDR video editing and exporting, and support for HEVC and HEIF formats that Apple started utilizing with the launch of iOS 11.

Let us know what you think of the iMac Pro in the comment section below. We have one on order and will be seeing what it's capable of and comparing it to the 2017 5K iMac in a variety of tasks.

For the best prices on a new iMac Pro, please visit our iMac Pro Price Guide.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,847member
    Want vs need.  What a pleasant conundrum.
    watto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 2 of 22
    entropys said:
    Want vs need.  What a pleasant conundrum.
    And I thought my Mac Pro purchase in 2014 for $4299 was expensive. I think that model is going to have to last me for a few more years. Bring on the new Mac Pro and we'll see.
    cornchipwatto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 3 of 22
    One question that would be useful to have answered when you do the review is about the configurations for the three memory options. Mainly this: Is the 64GB 2x32GB or 4x16GB?

    Crucial does not seem to be selling a 16GB RDIMM, only 8GB and 32GB, so maybe Apple isn't using those? In that case, the 64GB configuration must be 2x32GB. If so, it makes sense to pay the $800 go to 64GB, because you don't have to replace anything if you upgrade to 128GB later on, unlike if you are at 32GB (assuming 4x8GB).
    edited December 2017 watto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 4 of 22
    Ichiwawa!
    Scot1
  • Reply 5 of 22
    One question that would be useful to have answered when you do the review is about the configurations for the three memory options. Mainly this: Is the 64GB 2x32GB or 4x16GB?

    Crucial does not seem to be selling a 16GB RDIMM, only 8GB and 32GB, so maybe Apple isn't using those? In that case, the 64GB configuration must be 2x32GB. If so, it makes sense to pay the $800 go to 64GB, because you don't have to replace anything if you upgrade to 128GB later on, unlike if you are at 32GB (assuming 4x8GB).
    Max says that all Xeon processors are designed to work in Quad channel Ram configs. There's 4 slots in the iMac Pro. Each configuration should be using all 4 slots.

    BTW: The back is sealed. You can't add or remove RAM on the iMac Pro.
    edited December 2017 chiarepressthis
  • Reply 6 of 22
    Memory cannot be updgraded. So buy what you need.
    repressthis
  • Reply 7 of 22
    32 should be fine for most people. You'd know if you need more, and wouldn't be here asking. 
    kirkgraymacxpress
  • Reply 8 of 22
    Jeff_Rey said:
    Memory cannot be updgraded. So buy what you need.
    The RAM looks slotted in the pictures on Apple so it should be upgradable, but like on the 2017 and the pre-2015 slim 21.5" iMacs the RAM slots are on the back of the logic board so an upgrade requires you to remove the display and the logic board.

    The heat pipes and other design features would probably make that beyond the average user.

    iFixit teardown will explain all!
    1STnTENDERBITSrandominternetpersonkirkgraycornchip
  • Reply 9 of 22
    The RAM is upgradable by Apple/authorized service dealers but that sounds like a panic in the ass.
    1STnTENDERBITS
  • Reply 10 of 22
    Silly question. The A$20 000 one of course. Hang on my wife wants to speak to me... No, turns out I was wrong. The correct answer is "None of them. Use the 5k iMac you bought less than 6 months ago you blithering idiot."
    randominternetpersonkirkgraycornchipScot1focherentropyswatto_cobrajmulchino
  • Reply 11 of 22
    One question that would be useful to have answered when you do the review is about the configurations for the three memory options. Mainly this: Is the 64GB 2x32GB or 4x16GB?

    Crucial does not seem to be selling a 16GB RDIMM, only 8GB and 32GB, so maybe Apple isn't using those? In that case, the 64GB configuration must be 2x32GB. If so, it makes sense to pay the $800 go to 64GB, because you don't have to replace anything if you upgrade to 128GB later on, unlike if you are at 32GB (assuming 4x8GB).
    Max says that all Xeon processors are designed to work in Quad channel Ram configs. There's 4 slots in the iMac Pro. Each configuration should be using all 4 slots.

    BTW: The back is sealed. You can't add or remove RAM on the iMac Pro.
    Yes, thanks. That makes sense.

    To be clear, I didn't mean to imply the average individual would be able to change out the RAM. But it's not like an experienced (i.e., trained) tech can't do it. Obviously, while an individual's needs don't usually change, the way a given machine is being used within a shop can.
  • Reply 12 of 22
    It's interesting to note that the (non-boosted) clock speed goes down as the number of cores goes up, so for non-professional, optimized software the lower spec iMac Pros may actually perform better.  

    I'd go with the 10-core I suppose.

     8 core:  3.2GHz (boost to 4.2GHz)
    10 core:  3.0GHz (boost to 4.5GHz)
    14 core:  2.5GHz (boost to 4.3GHz)
    18 core:  2.3GHz (boost to 4.3Ghz)
    kirkgraycornchipchiarepressthis
  • Reply 13 of 22
    Why would anyone want to buy the iMac Pro for home use? Now, if your problem is to figure out where to waste your money, then this is a good place to do it. 

    I think the high-end iMac is plenty powerful for 99.999% of use cases. 
  • Reply 14 of 22
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,389member
    Surely they’re going to the iMac / Mac mini model here. Mac Pro will be the cheaper option without the monitor.

    Only thing that makes sense. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 22
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,138member
    martinxyz said:
    Silly question. The A$20 000 one of course. Hang on my wife wants to speak to me... No, turns out I was wrong. The correct answer is "None of them. Use the 5k iMac you bought less than 6 months ago you blithering idiot."
    Why it's only A$5 an hour assuming it's at least 100weeks of productivity before intel are going to release anything significantly better. Unlike the the A$10,000 option which will be beaten by next years offer ( ;-) I assume anyway)
  • Reply 16 of 22
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,762member
    martinxyz said:
    Silly question. The A$20 000 one of course. Hang on my wife wants to speak to me... No, turns out I was wrong. The correct answer is "None of them. Use the 5k iMac you bought less than 6 months ago you blithering idiot."
    Ah, your wife is the reason you’re not broke. Sounds like sensible woman. 👍🏾
    mattinozGG1chiarandominternetperson
  • Reply 17 of 22
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,762member

    markaceto said:
    The RAM is upgradable by Apple/authorized service dealers but that sounds like a panic in the ass.
    Is that an actual expression or did you mistype?

    Either way … hilarious! 

    randominternetpersonmacxpressrepressthis
  • Reply 18 of 22
    Rayz2016 said:

    markaceto said:
    The RAM is upgradable by Apple/authorized service dealers but that sounds like a panic in the ass.
    Is that an actual expression or did you mistype?

    Either way … hilarious! 

    Sounds like the name of a punk band. 
    kingofsomewherehot
  • Reply 19 of 22
    Rayz2016 said:

    markaceto said:
    The RAM is upgradable by Apple/authorized service dealers but that sounds like a panic in the ass.
    Is that an actual expression or did you mistype?

    Either way … hilarious! 

    Sounds like the name of a punk band. 
     :D 
  • Reply 20 of 22
    focherfocher Posts: 645member
    It's interesting to note that the (non-boosted) clock speed goes down as the number of cores goes up, so for non-professional, optimized software the lower spec iMac Pros may actually perform better.  

    I'd go with the 10-core I suppose.

     8 core:  3.2GHz (boost to 4.2GHz)
    10 core:  3.0GHz (boost to 4.5GHz)
    14 core:  2.5GHz (boost to 4.3GHz)
    18 core:  2.3GHz (boost to 4.3Ghz)
    I noticed that too, and it drove my decision to opt for the 10 core configuration (64GB / 1TB).
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