Apple's Mac sales in the holiday quarter solid, beats expanding overall PC market expansio...

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  • Reply 21 of 25
    nhtnht Posts: 4,429member

    avon b7 said:
    One worthless snippet. I commute 120km (roundtrip) into a major city five days a week. I leave and return at different times and pass through a very popular and affluent tourist destination on my way. This means I get to travel with a large mix of people from all walks of life and they aren't the same faces every day.

    While iPhones are common, I have yet to see one single new (late 2016 styling) MBP in the wild. Nor a MB for that matter. And professionally the same applies.

    MBAs and pre late 2016 MBPs are common when I commute. For work, Macs are sparse anyway but that's because of the areas I work in and should be considered normal. If I visit HP I don't expect to see many Macs and in university settings (not students) Chromebooks dominate, for example.

    While unrepresentative, I still find this detail very surprising. Especially the MB part.

    This year I have no plans to visit MWC2018 unless there is an unexpected call from someone with last minute problems but the city will be packed with people towing laptops and phones and I'll see if any new MBPs appear in bars, restaurants and on public transport.

    Similarly worthless, blue line Metro in and out of DC is loaded with the MacBook, with a periodic 2016+ MacBook Pro. The older MBPs and Airs seem to be going by the wayside.
    He lives in Spain or something.  Not exactly a powerhouse economy if so.
  • Reply 22 of 25
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,462member
    nht said:

    avon b7 said:
    One worthless snippet. I commute 120km (roundtrip) into a major city five days a week. I leave and return at different times and pass through a very popular and affluent tourist destination on my way. This means I get to travel with a large mix of people from all walks of life and they aren't the same faces every day.

    While iPhones are common, I have yet to see one single new (late 2016 styling) MBP in the wild. Nor a MB for that matter. And professionally the same applies.

    MBAs and pre late 2016 MBPs are common when I commute. For work, Macs are sparse anyway but that's because of the areas I work in and should be considered normal. If I visit HP I don't expect to see many Macs and in university settings (not students) Chromebooks dominate, for example.

    While unrepresentative, I still find this detail very surprising. Especially the MB part.

    This year I have no plans to visit MWC2018 unless there is an unexpected call from someone with last minute problems but the city will be packed with people towing laptops and phones and I'll see if any new MBPs appear in bars, restaurants and on public transport.

    Similarly worthless, blue line Metro in and out of DC is loaded with the MacBook, with a periodic 2016+ MacBook Pro. The older MBPs and Airs seem to be going by the wayside.
    He lives in Spain or something.  Not exactly a powerhouse economy if so.
    If it isn't in the world's top ten economies, it's not far off. As for mobile communications, it is very much a powerhouse. One of the reasons MWC is held in Spain and lots of 5G testing is done here.

    The US, on the other hand hardly has a stellar record in deploying communications technology to the masses.
  • Reply 23 of 25
    nhtnht Posts: 4,429member
    avon b7 said:
    nht said:

    avon b7 said:
    One worthless snippet. I commute 120km (roundtrip) into a major city five days a week. I leave and return at different times and pass through a very popular and affluent tourist destination on my way. This means I get to travel with a large mix of people from all walks of life and they aren't the same faces every day.

    While iPhones are common, I have yet to see one single new (late 2016 styling) MBP in the wild. Nor a MB for that matter. And professionally the same applies.

    MBAs and pre late 2016 MBPs are common when I commute. For work, Macs are sparse anyway but that's because of the areas I work in and should be considered normal. If I visit HP I don't expect to see many Macs and in university settings (not students) Chromebooks dominate, for example.

    While unrepresentative, I still find this detail very surprising. Especially the MB part.

    This year I have no plans to visit MWC2018 unless there is an unexpected call from someone with last minute problems but the city will be packed with people towing laptops and phones and I'll see if any new MBPs appear in bars, restaurants and on public transport.

    Similarly worthless, blue line Metro in and out of DC is loaded with the MacBook, with a periodic 2016+ MacBook Pro. The older MBPs and Airs seem to be going by the wayside.
    He lives in Spain or something.  Not exactly a powerhouse economy if so.
    If it isn't in the world's top ten economies, it's not far off. As for mobile communications, it is very much a powerhouse. One of the reasons MWC is held in Spain and lots of 5G testing is done here.

    The US, on the other hand hardly has a stellar record in deploying communications technology to the masses.
    By GDP 14th but that ignores an 18% unemployment rate...39% for younger workers and the GDP finally got back to 2008 levels last year.  Essentially a lost decade and the economy, while far better, isn’t at a level where normal folks or businesses have recovered.

    So it is no surprise that what you see are older machines.
    jony0
  • Reply 24 of 25
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,462member
    nht said:
    avon b7 said:
    nht said:

    avon b7 said:
    One worthless snippet. I commute 120km (roundtrip) into a major city five days a week. I leave and return at different times and pass through a very popular and affluent tourist destination on my way. This means I get to travel with a large mix of people from all walks of life and they aren't the same faces every day.

    While iPhones are common, I have yet to see one single new (late 2016 styling) MBP in the wild. Nor a MB for that matter. And professionally the same applies.

    MBAs and pre late 2016 MBPs are common when I commute. For work, Macs are sparse anyway but that's because of the areas I work in and should be considered normal. If I visit HP I don't expect to see many Macs and in university settings (not students) Chromebooks dominate, for example.

    While unrepresentative, I still find this detail very surprising. Especially the MB part.

    This year I have no plans to visit MWC2018 unless there is an unexpected call from someone with last minute problems but the city will be packed with people towing laptops and phones and I'll see if any new MBPs appear in bars, restaurants and on public transport.

    Similarly worthless, blue line Metro in and out of DC is loaded with the MacBook, with a periodic 2016+ MacBook Pro. The older MBPs and Airs seem to be going by the wayside.
    He lives in Spain or something.  Not exactly a powerhouse economy if so.
    If it isn't in the world's top ten economies, it's not far off. As for mobile communications, it is very much a powerhouse. One of the reasons MWC is held in Spain and lots of 5G testing is done here.

    The US, on the other hand hardly has a stellar record in deploying communications technology to the masses.
    By GDP 14th but that ignores an 18% unemployment rate...39% for younger workers and the GDP finally got back to 2008 levels last year.  Essentially a lost decade and the economy, while far better, isn’t at a level where normal folks or businesses have recovered.

    So it is no surprise that what you see are older machines.
    You will have to remind me what the root cause of that lost decade was and which country provoked it.

    Spain has been up to eighth position and fluctuates depending on the moment. Currently it is one of the fastest growing countries in Europe. Unemployment has always been a problem, even when it was eighth. That won't go away any time soon and possibly never. The same will happen to every developed nation as less and less labour is required.

    Europe is already debating how to tackle this problem and, while very early in the process, a universal income has already been listed as part of a potential solution.

    On consumer telecoms, Spain has one of the highest densities of handsets in the world, making it a prime target for the entire pricing range of handsets from major manufacturers.

    Most of the country has decent and fairly fast mobile data coverage. Fibre is even reaching the sparsely populated areas and some lucky souls even get cheap FTTH 1000Mbit/s options. That milestone was reached in 2014 and is not limited to business customers.

    https://www.adamo.es/en/

    EDIT: One of Spain's major economic strengths. Tourism.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/spain-replaces-us-popular-country-tourist-numbers-trump-slump-visitors-2017-world-tourism-a8160371.html


    edited January 2018
  • Reply 25 of 25
    anomeanome Posts: 1,256member
    welshdog said:
    toddzrx said:
    I watch a lot of new movies every month or so and Apple products definitely have a lot of presence on movie sets (even in So. Korean movies and dramas). The characters seem to be always using iPhones, iMacs and MacBooks, so Apple gets a lot of free advertising. I wonder why movie set directors choose Apple products as they're always said to be so much more expensive. Are they trying to give the characters a touch of class? The Apple logo certainly is distinctive.
    Apple products have always been prominent in TV and theater going back to the 80's.  I think this grew out of the fact that Macs were always good at graphics and video processing.  When the iPhone came along, Apple's reputation had already been established, not to mention that iPhones are usually seen as the "cool" brand.

    Anecdotally: my wife and I are watching all 9 seasons of Seinfeld and it's interesting to watch the various Mac models that are in Jerry's apartment throughout the years.  It's been a long tradition; it's not recent.
    There are several reasons Apple gear shows up in movies and TV and you got some of them.  Another is that certainly in the past, Apple computers were used by the very same people creating the movies and TV shows.  Editing, design, graphics and other departments often were Mac users.  It was natural for them to put their favorite computer in front of the cameras.  It's still true to some extent, but Macs face Windows competition in many of these areas now.  Another reason is that Apple has been very good at arranging product placement - without paying for it. I'm pretty sure they just give productions the Apple gear to use however they wish. The directors and production designers are happy to get free Apple kit in return for putting it in the show.

    There are stories that, back in the day, Apple specifically wasn't paying for product placement, while other companies were. When looking for set dressing, Macs looked cooler than most Windows machines, so art directors preferred them. So typically, Apple were the default option, while other manufacturers would pay to be seen in films. Maybe they were paying in some circumstances, but for a long time seeing non-Apple hardware was surprising.

    Meanwhile, these days Microsoft has made a huge push for product placement in prime time TV shows. I remember when the first monitors with glowing Windows icons on the back showed up in Arrow. They certainly weren't commercially available at the time, since Microsoft wasn't selling desktop systems. (I don't know if they're now available as part of the Surface line, or anything like that, I haven't been keeping up on their specifics.) Also, at least in the first season, all the smart phones were clearly iPhones in cases to make them look like they weren't iPhones. A colleague at work had exactly the same case on his iPhone that Oliver had, and whenever you saw the UI, it was clearly iOS, but any indication that it was an iPhone was obscured. I'm pretty sure they use mostly Android now.

    My brother also noticed watching [I]Elementary[/I] that there was a lot of prominent placement of Surface tablets. He said the scenes often looked forced, and like they'd been shot sometime later and inserted into the scene.

    To this day, the most natural seeming placement of computers in any film I've seen is Wag the Dog where everybody used a different make of laptop, and whenever you see the screen, regardless of what it is, all that was open was Freecell.

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