Ill-informed YouTuber bemoans Apple repair policies after breaking iMac Pro

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  • Reply 61 of 270
    majorsl said:
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    This. This is why so many professionals are running Hackintoshes.  They want expandability on their terms.  They want modular equipment.

    2K display obsolete? Buy a 5k and new video card (if necessary) for a fraction of the price of a new machine.  Expand RAM as needed. eGPU may fix some of that, but it's not a magic bullet.

    Apple hates this as the control freaks that they are.  They think everyone is going to blow up their equipment with a RAM upgrade, or that's the excuse.  The real reason is profit. Non-expandability and upgradability results in more unit sales when the widget they sold goes obsolete.  Mark my words: it is only a matter of time before the only software you can install on your Mac will be via the App Store.  A complete walled garden in the name of security, but really that's more profit too when you get a precent of sales!  I guess, in a way, you can't blame them for this.

    If they switch fully away from Intel and Hackintoshes are no longer possible, many of those Pro users will just go to another platform and to hell with Apple's software. Maybe Apple doesn't care.  They've long since tilted towards users who consume media and not create it because their obsession with the iOS is proof enough for this.

    1) What professionals are running hackintoshes? That makes zero sense right there. 

    2) why should Apple care about losing people the run hackintoshes? Those people are literally non-customers.

    3) professionals coming or going could really depend on the software available on the new Macs. What hackintosh users want is beyond irrelivent. They’ve already dedicated themselves to not be apple’s customers. 

    4) as it stands now, iOS has far more developer support than OS X. You say people will leave but it was the same song and dance when apple switched to Intel. People talked about jumping ship because switching to Intel means Apple is dooooomed and legacy software won’t work on x86. Apple made the transition as smooth as possible and they flourished.
    radarthekatmacxpressbaconstangStrangeDays
  • Reply 62 of 270
    jwestveer said:
    You took your machine apart and broke it in the process?

    Awww, thats too bad.  Buy another one.  It is not the manufacture's problem.
    The iMac Pro’s sell for as much as $13,000, these aren’t iPhones or iPads, or even MacBooks.

    The “real” Mac Pro hasn’t been released yet.  I expect sales to be much better than iMac Pro...

    Real Pro users upgrade their machines.

    - No one is arguing that these guys didn’t know what they were doing, and the damage is on them.
    This is nonsensical, and wrong.
    Took the words right out my mouth. 
    liquidmark
  • Reply 63 of 270

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    Apple isn’t stopping them from fixing it themselves. They just aren’t helping them facilitate the repair. If they want to fix it themselves, then they just need to fix it.

    The machine was in working order before they opened it up and broke it. The machine is now out of warranty because they broke it through their own purposeful action. 
    The only problem is they can’t get parts for some of the broken pieces. 
  • Reply 64 of 270
    bitmodbitmod Posts: 171member
    My concern would be if you accidentally broke your iMac pro (dropped it while moving it) - that you are SOL. 
  • Reply 65 of 270
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages.
    What on earth are you talking about? Sue Apple for what? It’s like if you got drunk and totaled your car and the shop said “It’s totaled man, find a new car.” You can’t sue the mechanic.

    I have tons of shit in my house I can’t repair, and I can’t sue the old TV repair guy if he says it’s not worth it to try (try) and fix a ruined flat panel. Same thing. 
    It’s even worse than that. It’s like he bought a Jaguar XJ, installed nitrous and modified the engine, totally blew the engine, ruined the drivetrain electronics and steering and then he wants to complain that jaguar won’t essentially sell him enough parts to rebuild a Jaguar XJ sans chassis.
    radarthekatbaconstangStrangeDaysandrewj5790
  • Reply 66 of 270
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    I can assure you that if I had an issue with my iMac Pro that Apple would fix it. That’s because I don’t tear it apart or if I did I wouldn’t even ask. 
    liquidmarkradarthekatmacxpresspscooter63baconstang
  • Reply 67 of 270
    kruegdude said:

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    Apple isn’t stopping them from fixing it themselves. They just aren’t helping them facilitate the repair. If they want to fix it themselves, then they just need to fix it.

    The machine was in working order before they opened it up and broke it. The machine is now out of warranty because they broke it through their own purposeful action. 
    The only problem is they can’t get parts for some of the broken pieces. 
    They’re not entitled to have the parts. They need to fix it with different parts. What parts those would be or where they’ll get them from is their problem, not apples or anyone else’s.
    kruegduderadarthekat
  • Reply 68 of 270
    One thing Apple doesn't want to talk about is that repairs on this iMac are not easy. You can't buy this Mac at an Apple Store and have them upgrade the ram like you can on a 27" non-pro iMac.

    Apple does have the right to refuse to repair any of their products if they determine they were worked on by someone unauthorized to repair them. 

    I think If Appleinsider has any contacts that are authorized to repair these Macs, and can remain anonymous, they should ask them how hard is it to repair these machines and how long replacement parts take to get. 

    I'm sure no one wants to work on anything that has been partially disassembled by someone who is not trained on how to repair whatever it is. 

    The lesson here is if you break an iMac, don't try to repair it yourself unless you are prepared to eat the whole cost of the machine if it doesn't work after you worked on it. 
  • Reply 69 of 270
    bitmod said:
    My concern would be if you accidentally broke your iMac pro (dropped it while moving it) - that you are SOL. 
    Insurance. 
    macxpressbaconstang
  • Reply 70 of 270
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,222administrator

    Apple does have the right to refuse to repair any of their products if they determine they were worked on by someone unauthorized to repair them. 

    I think If Appleinsider has any contacts that are authorized to repair these Macs, and can remain anonymous, they should ask them how hard is it to repair these machines and how long replacement parts take to get. 

    I'm sure no one wants to work on anything that has been partially disassembled by someone who is not trained on how to repair whatever it is. 
    Well, we got a partial answer on difficulty. Three hours for an experienced, quick tech, as stated in the end of the article. As far as how long to get the parts from a depot? That depends on what Apple's got in stock. so we don't have a clear answer.
  • Reply 71 of 270
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 2,528moderator
    netrox said:
    This is EXACTLY why Mac Pros should be more modular. I honestly believe that Apple should fix it or if not be sued with punitive damages. I hope this makes Apple understand that there are consequences of selling a difficult to fix PC when trying to appeal to a very small market with a limited supply of materials. Apple's decision to have a trash can is extremely poor. And iMac Pro is no better despite being significantly faster than ever. It imposes serious constraints for professionals. When a new professional wants a fast machine, odds are the professional may not have much money and would like the option to easily upgrade with more storage and RAM. Professionals are NOT in business to have "small, fast, thin", they're in business to deliver content in less time. Real professionals know that time is money. I also don't consider my MacBook Pro to be truly "professional" despite being topped out with specs. They are NOWHERE as fast as a regular iMac when it comes to crunching numbers.
    Then don’t buy it.  Don’t tread on a company’s right to design and build their products as they see fit.  You want modular and easily user-upgradeble?  Go buy that.  But don’t complaint after you’ve bought a Lamborghini that it costs a fortune to rebuild the engine for even more power output.  

    (Let’s beat on these car anologies until we find one that works.  Lol)
    edited April 18 pscooter63baconstangStrangeDaysandrewj5790lamboaudi4
  • Reply 72 of 270
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,222administrator

    bitmod said:
    My concern would be if you accidentally broke your iMac pro (dropped it while moving it) - that you are SOL. 
    AppleCare+ covers drops and similar accidents. It does not cover disassembly failure.
    liquidmarkradarthekatmacxpresspscooter63baconstang
  • Reply 73 of 270
    kruegdude said:

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    Apple isn’t stopping them from fixing it themselves. They just aren’t helping them facilitate the repair. If they want to fix it themselves, then they just need to fix it.

    The machine was in working order before they opened it up and broke it. The machine is now out of warranty because they broke it through their own purposeful action. 
    The only problem is they can’t get parts for some of the broken pieces. 
    They’re not entitled to have the parts. They need to fix it with different parts. What parts those would be or where they’ll get them from is their problem, not apples or anyone else’s.
    Used to be we couldn’t buy our own land line telephones. Now we have the iPhone. 
    baconstang
  • Reply 74 of 270
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,174member
    I see a cracked screen...

    How is it possible all the parts listed are actually damaged?

    Did it get hit by lightning?  It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.

    Is the damage Apple’s fault?  Obviously not.  But the Apple Store should be able to send it somewhere to get fixed, and not for $5000+.

    This story is embarrassing for Apple...
    They say in the video that it required a power supply, a motherboard, and the display. They really damaged it when putting it back together. They aren't at all disagreeing with what needs repaired, and are in fact the ones who confirm what parts were damaged.

    So two things. The third-party repair shop lied to get out of doing the repair because the repair certification has been available since before they asked, and the parts that were needed were available about a month or two after they went in to inquire about it. It sometimes takes a bit after launch for parts to make their way through the system and made available to stores and third-party repair shops.

    If they went in with the Pro today, chances are it would be able to be repaired. But remember, at this point, the only thing that is left without needing repair is basically a shell, some ram, and the SSD. The rest is shot and needing to be replaced. It would have been cheaper to buy a new one.

    The video is really just clickbait and hammed up for the camera.
    I think the moral of the story is don’t buy an “all in one” iMac Pro from Apple.  Those parts shouldn’t have been more than $1500, unless they did something stupid and soldered the processor to the motherboard.

    If you buy a Pro machine, everything should be able to be swapped out: the CPU, GPU, drive, ram, etc. (no the CPU probably isn’t upgradable for a reasonable amount).

    The “can’t be upgraded” bit them in the ass.  This is a poor design for a Pro machine.
    Please explain to me why, for example, the Cirrus Logic CS42L83 audio/DAC found in the iMac Pro should not be soldered to the logic board and swappable?
    edited April 18 liquidmark
  • Reply 75 of 270
    kruegdude said:
    kruegdude said:

    Federal law says you can repair your own things, and manufacturers cannot force you to use their own repair services.

    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ne9qdq/warranty-void-if-removed-stickers-illegal-ftc

    Appleinsider's argument is against federal law where you have the right to repair.  Manufacturers cannot void warranty just because the product is opened up. 
    Apple isn’t stopping them from fixing it themselves. They just aren’t helping them facilitate the repair. If they want to fix it themselves, then they just need to fix it.

    The machine was in working order before they opened it up and broke it. The machine is now out of warranty because they broke it through their own purposeful action. 
    The only problem is they can’t get parts for some of the broken pieces. 
    They’re not entitled to have the parts. They need to fix it with different parts. What parts those would be or where they’ll get them from is their problem, not apples or anyone else’s.
    Used to be we couldn’t buy our own land line telephones. Now we have the iPhone. 
    I’m not quite old enough to remember a time when we couldn’t buy landline phones. However, my issue is that people are complaining that Apple is somehow not allowing them to fix the iMac when Apple just isn’t helping them. They can fix the iMac Pro, but they need to get parts from somewhere else other than Apple or any official channel. Rather fitting considering that they got into this mess to begin with by sttem[ting or modify a machine or spite apple and not knowing what they were doing.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 76 of 270
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 2,528moderator
    bitmod said:
    My concern would be if you accidentally broke your iMac pro (dropped it while moving it) - that you are SOL. 
    Don’t do that.  Without having some sort of insurance that would cover it.  Same with accidentally driving your car into your garage while the garage door is closed. 
    edited April 18 baconstangandrewj5790
  • Reply 77 of 270
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,174member
    I think I'm coming around to seanismorris' thinking¡ Having smaller elements built-into a larger, more complex device is a huge waste. We're moving backwards, people! That's why I now believe that every transitor should be socketed and removable, just like in the good old days of computing. It's what the real pros did. Big Microchip wants you to buy an entire processor with billions of transistors already built into a chip with how some know-nothings thought it should be designed. Let me arrange and then program those transistors how I see fit.
    edited April 18 liquidmarkanomepscooter63baconstangandrewj5790lamboaudi4
  • Reply 78 of 270
    Jw8Jw8 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    The point is Apple couldn't fix it without replacing the entire thing because they don't have the parts. Regardless how you broke your new fancy Mac. Apple would have to replace the entire computer instead of fixing it, in house. Stupid. 
    edited April 18
  • Reply 79 of 270
     It sounds like Apple didn’t have the parts or experience to make the repairs.
    They probably chose not to repair, because there can be a multitude of components that are potentially damaged and Apple will have to pick up the tab if they agree to make a repair and something fails later. Why would they do that? It is much easier for them to not fix it at all, rather than fixing one component only to have another fail because he was damaged it. If that was the case, he could still claim that they did not do a repair properly and how shitty of a company Apple is. 

    In this case - they have a reason to refuse (because now they can't guarantee the quality of repairs/product, unless they replace the whole item, which would be excessive).
  • Reply 80 of 270
    What i found rather funny is that shortly before i'd seen Linus post this video i had been having my morning coffee with a co-worker and for whatever reason i had been telling him about Linus' original video reviewing the IMac Pro (Which obviously lead to it's damage). 1 of the points he made, was that there is no video in. So down the line when you want to upgrade you can't even get extra use out of the machine by using is as a 2nd monitor. This is a rather deliberate choice by Apple to create Forced Obsolescence. It's rather shady and definitely Anti-Consumer. This issue he's now having has the same smell of even more Forced Obsolescence.
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