Dell XPS 13 9370 vs. Apple's 13-inch MacBook Pro, the ultimate comparison

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    I have been looking at XPS Laptop since I bought the retina MacBook 2015. the XPS is a great machine and Apple should take a serious look at it. 

    ;Max Yuryev
    I have been an Apple computer user since 1981 but using windows at work most of my life. If you (Max Yuryev) made the switch 4 years ago, you did not have the best timing. Software quality has been going down for the past 4 years on macOS and iOS. I help people to do thing on macOS and iOS but now, I see bugs on both OS everyday. Things that don't follow the "It's just Work" that was the macOS Before.  
    There have always been bugs (some quite egregious), as well as delays, market dudes, and advertised features that were quietly removed before launch. We need to consider the complexity, integration and mindshare when we react to the echo chamber. 

    StrangeDays
  • Reply 62 of 116
    KITAKITA Posts: 140member
    linkman said:
    KITA said:
    I'd be curious how something like the MateBook X Pro would fare. It has a 14" 3000x2000 display with the same brightness and color gamut as the 13" MBP. They also managed to stick a low power dGPU in there, the NVIDIA MX150 with 2 GB GDDR5.


    MateBook X Pro? Just how is that not trademark infringement? Huawei even capitalizes the B in the name. And the laptop is very similar looking to the MacBook Pro. If I were Apple I'd definitely be suing.
    Why would it be a trademark infringement? While certain aspects look similar to a MacBook Pro, it has a 3:2 touch display with essentially no bezel and a camera hidden in a keyboard key. These are very distinct design features.
     

    Apple never sued ASUS for any of their ZenBook laptops and some of those look very similar to the MacBook Air.


    edited May 6
  • Reply 63 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    KITA said:
    linkman said:
    KITA said:
    I'd be curious how something like the MateBook X Pro would fare. It has a 14" 3000x2000 display with the same brightness and color gamut as the 13" MBP. They also managed to stick a low power dGPU in there, the NVIDIA MX150 with 2 GB GDDR5.

    [image]
    MateBook X Pro? Just how is that not trademark infringement? Huawei even capitalizes the B in the name. And the laptop is very similar looking to the MacBook Pro. If I were Apple I'd definitely be suing.
    Why would it be a trademark infringement? While certain aspects look similar to a MacBook Pro, it has a 3:2 touch display with essentially no bezel and a camera hidden in a keyboard key. These are very distinct design features.
     
    [image]

    Apple never sued ASUS for any of their ZenBook laptops and some of those look very similar to the MacBook Air.

    [image]
    Having a distinct feature doesn't mean it's not infringing, or are you McDowell and think your burger is "distinct" because you omit the sesame seeds on the bun? The difference between MacBook Pro and MateBook X Pro are very close and they're the exact same type of product for same type of customer so I easily see how this is infringing on Apple's brand.


    edited May 6 StrangeDays
  • Reply 64 of 116
    KITAKITA Posts: 140member
    Soli said:
    KITA said:
    linkman said:
    KITA said:
    I'd be curious how something like the MateBook X Pro would fare. It has a 14" 3000x2000 display with the same brightness and color gamut as the 13" MBP. They also managed to stick a low power dGPU in there, the NVIDIA MX150 with 2 GB GDDR5.

    [image]
    MateBook X Pro? Just how is that not trademark infringement? Huawei even capitalizes the B in the name. And the laptop is very similar looking to the MacBook Pro. If I were Apple I'd definitely be suing.
    Why would it be a trademark infringement? While certain aspects look similar to a MacBook Pro, it has a 3:2 touch display with essentially no bezel and a camera hidden in a keyboard key. These are very distinct design features.
     
    [image]

    Apple never sued ASUS for any of their ZenBook laptops and some of those look very similar to the MacBook Air.

    [image]
    Having a distinct feature doesn't mean it's not infringing, or are you McDowell and think your burger is "distinct" because you omit the sesame seeds on the bun? The difference between MacBook Pro and MateBook X Pro are very close and they're the exact same type of product for same type of customer so I easily see how this is infringing on Apple's brand.

    [video]
    The distinct features are inherent of a different design. Even the chassis is a different shape than the MBP.



  • Reply 65 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    KITA said:
    Soli said:
    KITA said:
    linkman said:
    KITA said:
    I'd be curious how something like the MateBook X Pro would fare. It has a 14" 3000x2000 display with the same brightness and color gamut as the 13" MBP. They also managed to stick a low power dGPU in there, the NVIDIA MX150 with 2 GB GDDR5.

    [image]
    MateBook X Pro? Just how is that not trademark infringement? Huawei even capitalizes the B in the name. And the laptop is very similar looking to the MacBook Pro. If I were Apple I'd definitely be suing.
    Why would it be a trademark infringement? While certain aspects look similar to a MacBook Pro, it has a 3:2 touch display with essentially no bezel and a camera hidden in a keyboard key. These are very distinct design features.
     
    [image]

    Apple never sued ASUS for any of their ZenBook laptops and some of those look very similar to the MacBook Air.

    [image]
    Having a distinct feature doesn't mean it's not infringing, or are you McDowell and think your burger is "distinct" because you omit the sesame seeds on the bun? The difference between MacBook Pro and MateBook X Pro are very close and they're the exact same type of product for same type of customer so I easily see how this is infringing on Apple's brand.

    [video]
    The distinct features are inherent of a different design. Even the chassis is a different shape than the MBP.
    Again—and more directly, this time—what the fuck does that have to do with the god damn name?
    edited May 6 StrangeDays
  • Reply 66 of 116
    thttht Posts: 2,858member
    cgWerks said: 
    tht said:
    Apple are letting retailers have big sales because there are trying to clear inventories for the laptop updates coming this summer.

    Haven't they been having those sales for a year or so now?
    You can go to the Appleinsider deals page at:

    https://deals.appleinsider.com/

    And look at the deals over the past year see if their is a trend. Basically all Mid 2017 Macs have $200 off type deals from 3rd party retailers over the past month or so. The mid 2017 iMac, mid 2017 MBP and mid 2017 MB all have deals. A 256 GB SSD MBP13 FN can be had for $1300. Good deal. If you go back in time, the deals for the mid 2017 get fewer, and likely center around holiday says or introduction sales. 

    (If you look at it with an iPhone, the dates of the deal are there, while they are not on an iPad and presumably a PC web browser. Maybe it is wishful thinking, but those devices are definitely due for changes over the next couple of months.
    jSnively
  • Reply 67 of 116
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,718member
    Soli said:
    KITA said:
    Soli said:
    KITA said:
    linkman said:
    KITA said:
    I'd be curious how something like the MateBook X Pro would fare. It has a 14" 3000x2000 display with the same brightness and color gamut as the 13" MBP. They also managed to stick a low power dGPU in there, the NVIDIA MX150 with 2 GB GDDR5.

    [image]
    MateBook X Pro? Just how is that not trademark infringement? Huawei even capitalizes the B in the name. And the laptop is very similar looking to the MacBook Pro. If I were Apple I'd definitely be suing.
    Why would it be a trademark infringement? While certain aspects look similar to a MacBook Pro, it has a 3:2 touch display with essentially no bezel and a camera hidden in a keyboard key. These are very distinct design features.
     
    [image]

    Apple never sued ASUS for any of their ZenBook laptops and some of those look very similar to the MacBook Air.

    [image]
    Having a distinct feature doesn't mean it's not infringing, or are you McDowell and think your burger is "distinct" because you omit the sesame seeds on the bun? The difference between MacBook Pro and MateBook X Pro are very close and they're the exact same type of product for same type of customer so I easily see how this is infringing on Apple's brand.

    [video]
    The distinct features are inherent of a different design. Even the chassis is a different shape than the MBP.
    Again—and more directly, this time—what the fuck does that have to do with the god damn name?
    For naming:

    In 2011 there was the Huawei Ascend X.
    In 2013 the Huawei Ascend Mate line was released.
    Later, 'Ascend' was dropped from the name leaving just 'Mate'.
    Later came the P series with 'Pro' versions.
    The exact same naming options were applied to the Mate line so there are Mate Pro versions too.
    When Huawei entered the laptop market it didn't take a genius to come up with 'MateBook' for naming in different versions. It makes complete sense and no one has had any complaints whatsoever. Likewise, with the step up in features, adding the 'Pro' label to MateBook was a no brainer.

    The names are somewhat similar but no one is going to confuse them. Both have their own reasons for having the names they have.





    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 68 of 116
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,638member
    cropr said:
    MBP has a clearly better trackpad and a better webcam.
    I can see how the trackpad on the Apple might be better than the Dell, but I don't like it compared to the 2015 MBP. It's just way too big and in the way.

    foregoneconclusion said:
    Is it really an equivalent in terms of the looks or industrial design? No. Dell also cuts a number of corners with both the display and the trackpad, which are two critical components of daily use.
    No, Apple's build-quality and overall physical design are better. But, decisions like the keyboard, trackpad size, ports, and CPU are also critical to daily use. If it's apples to apples (pardon the pun), then I'd pick the Apple and pay a premium to do so. But, if the decision is between a well-built Apple that is awkwardly designed and behind the times, and a Dell that is good-enough, but cheaper and more usable, I'd go for the latter (besides Windows).

    For me, the real story was:   "Chevrolet hardware just caught up to Porsche hardware"
    ...
    Largely, it's the OS that really set the machines apart.   But it's also more than that.   The MBP provides access to the Apple ecosystem that includes ongoing security that can be trusted, support, integration with other Apple products, and other things that combine to make Apple products "just work".
    More like Porsche experiments with a failed design, so Chevrolet largely blows past it.

    But, yes, it ultimately comes down to the OS for most of us (which is why I'm not running out to buy that Dell). These comparisons are helpful, though, to see how Apple is really doing. I remember a time when Apple laptops blew away everything but non-apples to apples gaming laptops.

    dewme said:
    The moral of the story here is that if you pay as much or more for a Windows PC from a decent supplier like Dell as you do for a similarly spec'd Mac you should be able to get a PC that is legitimately comparable to the Mac. This is fully what I'd expect. But time and time again we have to listen to the sad chorus of commenters and pundits claiming that Macs are "so much more expensive" than PCs and all of the "Apple Tax" BS. The reality is that the PC market is flooded with lots of low spec, horrible build quality, and low performance junk that is sold at junk level prices. Look at Dell's sales sites and you'll still see x768 displays. Go to a big box retailer and actually lay your hands on the flimsy plastic notebooks being sold at bargain prices. Apple doesn't serve the junk market that many PC vendors do. It's not a knock on PC makers either because a lot of people are adequately served by the low end stuff and as long as they understand the notion that you get what you pay for there's no reason to complain. No harm and no foul, but the price arguments against Apple have to stop and this Dell XPS is a great example of why. 
    Yea, this is quite true. My son has saved up for a MBP and our relatives think it's crazy he's thinking of spending that much on a laptop, as in their minds, a laptop should cost $500 - $800. That clearly isn't a fair comparison... but this Dell shows that when you get closer to a fair comparison (and in some ways ahead of Apple), the pricing isn't as far apart as they'd think.

    Of course, that's all a bit irrelevant if you can't get what you want from Apple or Apple makes design blunders. At that point, it comes down to whether you can deal with one OS or the other. If you can't, you have to take what you can get and spend what you need to spend.

    Those who opted for Windows machines may have saved seconds each day on routine computing activities, while spending hundreds of minutes each year removing viruses and performing other major maintenance on their computers. Overall, neither approach can objectively be proved better than the other — but one approach (Mac) is better for me, while the other approach is better for people who have the time and energy for coping with Windows. I applaud their tenacity!
    This has been the case for a long time, but it has been rapidly eroding. If Apple doesn't do an about-face in terms of software quality and put some priority back on the Mac line, the two streams are going to cross in the next few years, I think.

    GeorgeBMac said:
    I don't think Apple cut any corners with their keyboard.  Rather, they simply pushed too far, too hard trying to get a thin and light keyboard.  Basically, it's more of a design problem than the result of corner cutting.  When they originally released it they were quite proud of it.
    Yea, since Dell got this keyboard in here, I/we might have been wrong about the thin design thing. Of course, IMO, that sucks even more because that means Apple is purposely trying to make the keyboard thinner, even if it isn't needed.

    I have been looking at XPS Laptop since I bought the retina MacBook 2015. the XPS is a great machine and Apple should take a serious look at it. 
    Yes, I know a few people who have switched from MacBook Pros to Dell XPSs. While I think there are better built machines out there (like Lenovo?), that seems to be a popular replacement choice, especially at the 15" size.
  • Reply 69 of 116
    thttht Posts: 2,858member
    Soli said:
    Your level of acceptance for the thickness of the device is pending Max making a measurement, and you only think that maybe it is not 0.46” thick. Your call.
    If you want to test your hypothesis then go right ahead, but I've seen nothing that suggest you have access to one. The burden of proof is on you, not everyone else to disprove your statements. And your odd use of "acceptance" is a clear indicator to me that you're failing to see the point. I haven't accepted anything. If I did, I'd have shown the same prejudice you had or the opposing bias where I've said that Dell can't be questioned, yet I've clearly stated that I'd like to see physical measurements. I have no bias; I only want to now the truth.
    I used “acceptance” because you are suspicious of it not being 0.46” thick based on the pictures, but you would rather have an actual measurement of the device to be convinced. Not strange to me. Not a big deal to argue about. 

    Like I said before, here it is in image:


    We know the audio ports are 3.5mm in diameter. The rest is drawing circles and doing the proportional math on the diameters and converting to English units. This pretty much conclusive proves to me that the 0.46” thickness Dell is advertising is the back face and doesn’t include the thicker middle of the device.
  • Reply 70 of 116
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,638member
    Soli said:
    ;Max Yuryev
    I have been an Apple computer user since 1981 but using windows at work most of my life. If you (Max Yuryev) made the switch 4 years ago, you did not have the best timing. Software quality has been going down for the past 4 years on macOS and iOS. I help people to do thing on macOS and iOS but now, I see bugs on both OS everyday. Things that don't follow the "It's just Work" that was the macOS Before.  
    There have always been bugs (some quite egregious), as well as delays, market dudes, and advertised features that were quietly removed before launch. We need to consider the complexity, integration and mindshare when we react to the echo chamber. 
    Yes, there have always been bugs, problems, etc. But, I've been around the Mac now for over 30 years, and these last 5-10 haven't been like the years before. My glasses aren't rose-colored.

    Even in the mid-90s, I never once considered switching platforms. I never once was unsure about what products I should buy. Apple always had some machine that was a pretty good fit for me. I never spent hours upon hours solving simple problems with the family equipment.

    There have always been problems, but never to this magnitude or as foundation-shaking kind of problems.

    tht said:
    You can go to the Appleinsider deals page at:

    https://deals.appleinsider.com/

    And look at the deals over the past year see if their is a trend. Basically all Mid 2017 Macs have $200 off type deals from 3rd party retailers over the past month or so. The mid 2017 iMac, mid 2017 MBP and mid 2017 MB all have deals. A 256 GB SSD MBP13 FN can be had for $1300. Good deal. If you go back in time, the deals for the mid 2017 get fewer, and likely center around holiday says or introduction sales. 
    I don't have the historical data in front of me, but I'm pretty sure I've been seeing hundreds of dollars off 2016, maybe 2017, MacBook Pros for way longer than the last month or two. And, not just at AppleInsider deals.


  • Reply 71 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    cgWerks said:
    Soli said:
    ;Max Yuryev
    I have been an Apple computer user since 1981 but using windows at work most of my life. If you (Max Yuryev) made the switch 4 years ago, you did not have the best timing. Software quality has been going down for the past 4 years on macOS and iOS. I help people to do thing on macOS and iOS but now, I see bugs on both OS everyday. Things that don't follow the "It's just Work" that was the macOS Before.  
    There have always been bugs (some quite egregious), as well as delays, market dudes, and advertised features that were quietly removed before launch. We need to consider the complexity, integration and mindshare when we react to the echo chamber. 
    Yes, there have always been bugs, problems, etc. But, I've been around the Mac now for over 30 years, and these last 5-10 haven't been like the years before. My glasses aren't rose-colored.

    Even in the mid-90s, I never once considered switching platforms. I never once was unsure about what products I should buy. Apple always had some machine that was a pretty good fit for me. I never spent hours upon hours solving simple problems with the family equipment.

    There have always been problems, but never to this magnitude or as foundation-shaking kind of problems.
    I'm not sure how you can be so sure. For me, the buggiest version of iOS were the original release and first several point updates (at least) for iOS 2.x, as I recall. Now, how many iPhones did Apple sell in the Summer of 2008 compared to what they reported to sell this past quarter? I think that magnitude would be a good descriptor of their sales growth, and every aspect of the device is more complex, so wouldn't you expect the issues people have—even before we consider the echo chamber of the Internet and Apple's mindshare since then—a higher magnitude of reported issues? I would, which is why I can't say that most people complaining about iPhones today means it's a worse product than it was a decade ago. It maybe true, but I certainly validate that notion based on the given data and a personal anecdote from a decade old memory. So, yeah, I think your glasses are probably rose-colored.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 72 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    tht said:
    Soli said:
    Your level of acceptance for the thickness of the device is pending Max making a measurement, and you only think that maybe it is not 0.46” thick. Your call.
    If you want to test your hypothesis then go right ahead, but I've seen nothing that suggest you have access to one. The burden of proof is on you, not everyone else to disprove your statements. And your odd use of "acceptance" is a clear indicator to me that you're failing to see the point. I haven't accepted anything. If I did, I'd have shown the same prejudice you had or the opposing bias where I've said that Dell can't be questioned, yet I've clearly stated that I'd like to see physical measurements. I have no bias; I only want to now the truth.
    I used “acceptance” because you are suspicious of it not being 0.46” thick based on the pictures, but you would rather have an actual measurement of the device to be convinced. Not strange to me. Not a big deal to argue about. 

    Like I said before, here it is in image:


    We know the audio ports are 3.5mm in diameter. The rest is drawing circles and doing the proportional math on the diameters and converting to English units. This pretty much conclusive proves to me that the 0.46” thickness Dell is advertising is the back face and doesn’t include the thicker middle of the device.
    You've supported your hypothesis brilliantly.
  • Reply 73 of 116
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,638member
    Soli said:
    I'm not sure how you can be so sure. For me, the buggiest version of iOS were the original release and first several point updates (at least) for iOS 2.x, as I recall. Now, how many iPhones did Apple sell in the Summer of 2008 compared to what they reported to sell this past quarter? I think that magnitude would be a good descriptor of their sales growth, and every aspect of the device is more complex, so wouldn't you expect the issues people have—even before we consider the echo chamber of the Internet and Apple's mindshare since then—a higher magnitude of reported issues? I would, which is why I can't say that most people complaining about iPhones today means it's a worse product than it was a decade ago. It maybe true, but I certainly validate that notion based on the given data and a personal anecdote from a decade old memory. So, yeah, I think your glasses are probably rose-colored.
    Because I lived though it. :)
    I'm also not really talking about iOS... that's a different subject. (iOS is an accessory to me, for the most part.) But, I've also had a good bit of problems with iOS lately, mostly surrounding Apple ID entry boxes popping up all the time, or Apple trying to trick family members into updating when we aren't ready yet.
  • Reply 74 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    cgWerks said:
    Soli said:
    I'm not sure how you can be so sure. For me, the buggiest version of iOS were the original release and first several point updates (at least) for iOS 2.x, as I recall. Now, how many iPhones did Apple sell in the Summer of 2008 compared to what they reported to sell this past quarter? I think that magnitude would be a good descriptor of their sales growth, and every aspect of the device is more complex, so wouldn't you expect the issues people have—even before we consider the echo chamber of the Internet and Apple's mindshare since then—a higher magnitude of reported issues? I would, which is why I can't say that most people complaining about iPhones today means it's a worse product than it was a decade ago. It maybe true, but I certainly validate that notion based on the given data and a personal anecdote from a decade old memory. So, yeah, I think your glasses are probably rose-colored.
    Because I lived though it. :)
    I've lived through a lot stuff, too, or so I recall, but that doesn't mean it's accurate.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 75 of 116
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,638member
    Soli said:
    I've lived through a lot stuff, too, or so I recall, but that doesn't mean it's accurate.
    I know it's accurate for me, and since I don't seem to be the only one, that helps my confidence. :smile: 

    Prior to the last several years, we pretty much bought Macs and iDevices and used them. My family needed my help usually to get setup and I took care of backups. Aside from that, they rarely needed help. Same for me. While I always tinkered more, unless I wanted to get in the weeds, I could usually just use my Macs w/o issue.

    Yes, way back pre-OSX days, I had to re-load systems from time to time, but I had that process down pretty well and aside from data-transfer time and some 'merging' work, it was pretty consistent and dependable.

    But, what we've been facing in the last few years is a lot of stuff that just doesn't work like it should. I've run into problems that can't be fixed, and the system has gotten harder to re-load/maintain. A lot of the problem have been around the area of Apple IDs and Apple's cloud stuff... which was always pretty poor. I guess I didn't adopt a lot of that stuff in it's earlier days, wisely.

    Now, where my experience starts to fall apart, is that back in the 'old days' I *also* maintained a lot of systems for a wide range of users. So, of course I ran into a lot of troubles across the whole... but that was my job. I haven't done that kind of work recently, so I can't speak to the level of maintenance now required 'across the whole' anymore. So, I'm kind of excluding that aspect and just going by my own personal use and that of my family.
  • Reply 76 of 116
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 836member
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    KITA said:
    Soli said:
    KITA said:
    linkman said:
    KITA said:
    I'd be curious how something like the MateBook X Pro would fare. It has a 14" 3000x2000 display with the same brightness and color gamut as the 13" MBP. They also managed to stick a low power dGPU in there, the NVIDIA MX150 with 2 GB GDDR5.

    [image]
    MateBook X Pro? Just how is that not trademark infringement? Huawei even capitalizes the B in the name. And the laptop is very similar looking to the MacBook Pro. If I were Apple I'd definitely be suing.
    Why would it be a trademark infringement? While certain aspects look similar to a MacBook Pro, it has a 3:2 touch display with essentially no bezel and a camera hidden in a keyboard key. These are very distinct design features.
     
    [image]

    Apple never sued ASUS for any of their ZenBook laptops and some of those look very similar to the MacBook Air.

    [image]
    Having a distinct feature doesn't mean it's not infringing, or are you McDowell and think your burger is "distinct" because you omit the sesame seeds on the bun? The difference between MacBook Pro and MateBook X Pro are very close and they're the exact same type of product for same type of customer so I easily see how this is infringing on Apple's brand.

    [video]
    The distinct features are inherent of a different design. Even the chassis is a different shape than the MBP.
    Again—and more directly, this time—what the fuck does that have to do with the god damn name?
    For naming:

    In 2011 there was the Huawei Ascend X.
    In 2013 the Huawei Ascend Mate line was released.
    Later, 'Ascend' was dropped from the name leaving just 'Mate'.
    Later came the P series with 'Pro' versions.
    The exact same naming options were applied to the Mate line so there are Mate Pro versions too.
    When Huawei entered the laptop market it didn't take a genius to come up with 'MateBook' for naming in different versions. It makes complete sense and no one has had any complaints whatsoever. Likewise, with the step up in features, adding the 'Pro' label to MateBook was a no brainer.

    The names are somewhat similar but no one is going to confuse them. Both have their own reasons for having the names they have.





    It doesn't matter what path Huawei came to it; the MateBook X Pro name is very similar to the MacBook Pro name. The two products are in the same category. If I were in a jury deciding whether it infringed or not, I'd vote that it did. If someone sues, that decision is ultimately up to a jury.

    https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/226140
    SoliStrangeDays
  • Reply 77 of 116
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,286member
    It really is amazing the poor quality screens, trackpads and audio that Windows users accept as "normal" and "good". I've never personally used a PC laptop that has come close to my Mac's trackpad or sound quality. All but one PC laptops that I've used have had infuriating trackpads!
  • Reply 78 of 116
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,638member
    It really is amazing the poor quality screens, trackpads and audio that Windows users accept as "normal" and "good". I've never personally used a PC laptop that has come close to my Mac's trackpad or sound quality. All but one PC laptops that I've used have had infuriating trackpads!
    Apple makes really great trackpads. In fact, I switched to an Apple Magic Trackpad 2 last year after being a die-hard mouse user for most of my computer-using life. (I was starting to have too much pain with a mouse to continue... though I still keep one for precision work). But, I don't like the trackpad on the '16-'17 MBPs as it is just too big. It gets in the way.
  • Reply 79 of 116
    With regard to the bezel on the Dell vs Apple. It would be interesting if Apple adopted a "notch" on future MacBooks, so they could have edge-to-edge screen real estate, but still have FaceID. They could do that with future iMacs and whatever 5K/8K display the decide to pair with the Mac Pro as well. Sure, Apple trolls and most of tech media would howl about how ugly it is, but within a year, everyone else would put notches in their displays as well.
    Apple wouldn't even need to make significant changes to their interface design to accommodate the notch either, as the top menu items are designed from the outside in, leaving the middle portion pretty much unused.
    Personally though, in concept, I prefer TouchID to FaceID. I feel safer with a login system where I have to actively, deliberately, do something in order to login rather than a system that recognizes me and logs me in. Though I also understand the appeal of just turning on your computer and it working right away, where all the security protocols happen without you needing to do anything.
  • Reply 80 of 116
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,288member
    With regard to the bezel on the Dell vs Apple. It would be interesting if Apple adopted a "notch" on future MacBooks, so they could have edge-to-edge screen real estate, but still have FaceID.
    That's an interesting thought and I have to assume Apple has thought of it, but is it feasible?

    With iOS the UI isn't windowed and the Status Bar elements are fairly static, but with macOS the Menu Bar is quite varied in its contents. It can grow or shrink in thickness and the number of pixels used for the elements based on the app and how you scale the display in System Preferences. I'd say that most people have the space on their Mac, but I don't think Apple would be happen with it is most didn't have a problem. And with the Menu Bar currently being grey in the default state, if you scales the display so all the items are larger would there then be a thin gray line under the notch noting the cutout, or the notch reaching into the desktop if you scale everything to be smaller?

    Then you have differences in available space between a 12" MBP and a 27" iMac monitor. Now, I don't think it's impossible for Mac'model to tell the OS that pixels in a certain range don't exist so that that the Menu Bar items aren't being cut off but that seems like a lot work I wouldn't expect Apple to do since it has to done per device size. You'd also need a full screen option that could exclude the notch area (at least I wouldn't watch a movie on my Mac with the notch cutout).

    Finally, are Face ID components small enough to be placed into the lid of a Mac notebook?

    All hat said, I do like the idea.
    edited May 7
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