Apple refuses invitation to European Union tax evasion hearing

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    djsherlydjsherly Posts: 1,020member
    docbburk said:
    I wasn’t saying it was racist.  I was saying it was heavy handed, using a bit of hyperbole as well as metaphor.  
    Godwin’s Law, then.
    Yes. 

    Normally, it’s by the second page that Godwin’s law is fulfilled. Rarely the first post. 

    But it it’s something you just don’t do. Like using the n word. If it needs explaining to anyone, then they’re being deliberately obtuse. 
  • Reply 22 of 32
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,634administrator
    gatorguy said:
    foggyhill said:
    They respected Irish law, how is that Tax evasion, if anything, Apple should have a beef with Ireland bullshitting them but seemingly they're cool (at least in public, I'm sure some words were said in private though).
    It's not tax evasion and no one with any knowledge of it has ever claimed it was AFAIK. The AI headline was obviously a poor choice of words. 
    Given that the EU is calling it a tax evasion hearing, I'm pretty sure we're in the clear.
  • Reply 23 of 32
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,750member
    Well it’s the EU that reckons it’s tax evasion, not the Irish Government.
    What this is actually about is the EU upset the Irish had the temerity to set their own tax arrangements. The Irish didn’t do what they were told by their superiors.
  • Reply 24 of 32
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,732member
    gatorguy said:
    foggyhill said:
    They respected Irish law, how is that Tax evasion, if anything, Apple should have a beef with Ireland bullshitting them but seemingly they're cool (at least in public, I'm sure some words were said in private though).
    It's not tax evasion and no one with any knowledge of it has ever claimed it was AFAIK. The AI headline was obviously a poor choice of words. 
    Given that the EU is calling it a tax evasion hearing, I'm pretty sure we're in the clear.
    Wow. In that case I apologize. That's the first time I've heard Apple accused of that by the EU. 

    EDIT: Ok, reading up on this Apple isn't being accused of tax evasion AFAICT. I think the actual topic of discussion was tax evasion AND tax avoidance according to Europa press releases. Apple was among the companies, organizations and people invited to comment in front of the commission in a public hearing. I can completely understand Apple not wanting to be associated with it assuming that's the case. They have said they will meet in private tho. 
    edited June 2018 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 25 of 32
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,914member
  • Reply 26 of 32
    djsherlydjsherly Posts: 1,020member
    entropys said:
    Well it’s the EU that reckons it’s tax evasion, not the Irish Government.
    What this is actually about is the EU upset the Irish had the temerity to set their own tax arrangements. The Irish didn’t do what they were told by their superiors.
    entropys said:
    Well it’s the EU that reckons it’s tax evasion, not the Irish Government.
    What this is actually about is the EU upset the Irish had the temerity to set their own tax arrangements. The Irish didn’t do what they were told by their superiors.
    That’s how any federation works. Federations set the areas which are non-negotiable, and the members have carriage of the rest, or the other way around. Either way, temerity is not the word. If you don’t act in accordance with the agreement then then whole thing doesn’t work.

    It’s just like a state legislating to ban guns because their assessment is that they’re not safe. Won’t work because the framework the states agreed to was amended to say you can’t do that.

    Ireland probably thought they weren’t doing anything wrong, but if they violated any rules which the federation  controlled, then it’s still wrong according to the agreement and the federation is entitled to act. They will then argue that the agreement between Ireland and Apple was void ab initio (ie it never existed) and boom, hand the money over.
  • Reply 27 of 32
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    I don't think companies should have to appear before parliamentary committees *every* time they're asked. The job of the government is to create an environment of law and order for people to operate in, not harass and control the people. But in this case the subject is taxes which is a legitimate thing for the government to be quizzing people about, so maybe they should go. On the other hand they have to take the advice of their lawyers and be smart as does everyone.
  • Reply 28 of 32
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 263member
    docbburk said:
    I guess Sven thinks that would be the Reich’ thing to do?
    That remark is totally out of line. Really stupid, inappropriate and very offensive. You thought you were so witty and a real creative. You totally failed.
  • Reply 29 of 32
    xbitxbit Posts: 243member
    entropys said:
    Well it’s the EU that reckons it’s tax evasion, not the Irish Government.
    What this is actually about is the EU upset the Irish had the temerity to set their own tax arrangements. The Irish didn’t do what they were told by their superiors.
    Ireland’s tax arrangement with Apple was found to unlawful in court. Unlike in the US, the EU judiciary is independent from the government.

    Ireland voluntarily signed up to these rules. What did they think would happen when they broken them?
  • Reply 30 of 32
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    djsherly said:
    If you don’t act in accordance with the agreement then then whole thing doesn’t work. It’s just like a state legislating to ban guns because their assessment is that they’re not safe. Won’t work because the framework the states agreed to was amended to say you can’t do that.
    1. And yet they’ve still done it. As has the federal government. People don’t even give a shit. The 2nd amendment doesn’t exist anymore, and the 1st barely does.
    2. Ireland didn’t agree to the restrictions placed upon it–A SOVEREIGN NATION–by the EU. The EU also isn’t a federation, by the way. As much as its founders wanted it to be, the people of Europe are still willing to kill them all if they try it.
  • Reply 31 of 32
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,976member
    IrelandExit! Case closed!
  • Reply 32 of 32
    xbitxbit Posts: 243member
    tallest skil 
    2. Ireland didn’t agree to the restrictions placed upon it
    Yes, it did. TFEU - the 2007 treaty under which the current state aid rules were introduced - was ratified by all EU nations, including Ireland.
    gatorguysingularity
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