Comparing the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 performance versus the iPhone X

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 2018
Samsung just released its latest flagship phablet, the Galaxy Note 9, in a bid to one-up Apple's iPhone X before the Cupertino tech giant unleashes a new smartphone lineup this fall. We put the Note 9 to the test.





Samsung's Note 9 is very similar to past models in the line, and except for new cameras and a repositioned fingerprint sensor, it feels no different than the Galaxy S9 or Note 8.

Our evaluation unit packs in 128GB of onboard storage and 6GB of RAM for $999, double the storage and system memory Apple offers with identically-priced iPhone X. A higher tier Note 9 with 512GB of storage can be had for a hefty $1,249, or $100 more than a 256GB iPhone X.




On the inside, the Note 9 is packing the same Qualcomm 845 processor that's included in the Galaxy S9. It's an eight-core CPU that consists of four efficiency cores and four performance cores, running at up to 2.8GHz. By comparison, the iPhone X's Apple-designed A11 Bionic processor boasts six cores -- four efficiency cores and two high-performance cores -- running at a slightly lower clock speed of 2.39GHz.




Both Note 9 models get the same Adreno 630 graphics chip as the S9 and S9+, which Qualcomm says is 30 percent faster, 30 percent more efficient and has 2.5 times the display throughput than the graphics chip in the Note 8.

In addition to typical smartphone innards, Samsung incorporates a new water-carbon cooling system it claims prevents overheating.

Moving on to benchmark numbers, the iPhone X completely destroys the Note 9 in Geekbench 4, especially in single core performance. The iPhone came in with single- and multi-core scores of 4,224 and 10,667, respectively, while the Note 9 managed scores of 2,442 and 8,765. Interestingly, the Note 9's performance is an improvement over the S9+, which scored 2,007 and 8,307.




For Geekbench 4's graphics test, the Note 9 scored 14,365, only 57 points higher than the S9+, and very close to iPhone X's 15,301.




Moving on to the Antutu benchmark, the Note 9 actually beats out the iPhone by a good margin, with respective scores of 279,773 an 200,937. For Samsung, the boosted results are thanks to the massive improvements Qualcomm put into its graphics chip. It even scored a bit better than the S9+, which managed 263,661 points.




In Antutu's HTML 5 test, the Note 9's browser froze at the same point multiple times, but we suspect it would have scored similarly to the S9+ unit's 33,924 points. The iPhone X, on the other hand, scored 39,150 points. Octane 2.0, another browser benchmark, saw the iPhone X floor the Note 9 with scores of 36,714 to 20,194.




For our final test, we ran GFXBench OpenGL's 1080p Manhattan Offscreen test. The iPhone X is slightly ahead with a score of 5,551, compared to 5,152 on the Note 9. The new Note eked out a slightly better performance compared to the S9+, which scored 5,106.




Though it achieved higher marks better than the iPhone X in Antutu's 3D benchmark, the Note 9 is slower overall when compared to Apple's nearly year-old smartphone. In fact, the Note 9 is only a bit faster than the S9+.




We will be conducting more testing with the new Note 9 in the coming days, including photo and video comparisons.

Where to buy

Shoppers looking to purchase the Samsung Galaxy Note9 or iPhone X can take advantage of special offers at wireless carriers and electronics retailers.

For those that want to purchase the Note9 outright, B&H Photo is offering customers a free Samsung DeX Pad Dock and Qi Wireless Charger Duo valued at up to $218.99. The phone itself qualifies for free expedited shipping -- and B&H will not collect sales tax on orders shipped outside New York and New Jersey.

Wireless carriers AT&T and Verizon are also offering buy one, get one free promotions on the 128GB Note9.

For iPhone X buyers, T-Mobile and AT&T are offering $700 off a second iPhone X with qualifying plans and conditions. The devices are also available on eBay, often at a discount.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 45
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?
    ronnStrangeDaysracerhomie3chasmwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 45
    WLeeWLee Posts: 8unconfirmed, member
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,
    saltyzip
  • Reply 3 of 45
    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?

    Because it's not fair to compare Apples latest to Samsungs latest.
    ronn2old4funirelandclaire1chasmlolliverbb-15redgeminipawatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 4 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,678member
    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?

    Because it's not fair to compare Apples latest to Samsungs latest.
    How is it not fair? These are the latest devices from these companies. When the next iPhone is out it will surely be tested against this Samsung device and others. There's no skullduggery here and there's nothing atypical about comparing current devices.
    Carnage
  • Reply 5 of 45
    donth8donth8 Posts: 28member
    When it comes to Antutu there is a bug with the iOS app. If you drill down on the graphics test it says 0 for Refinery which removes at least 40,000 points from the score. I was able to replicate that same bug on the iPad too.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 45
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,339administrator
    WLee said:
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,
    Which is it going to be?

    When Windows PCs are ahead of the Mac on benchmarks, and when the Galaxy series was ahead, it's all about the benchmarks. When its the other way around, it's all about the intangibles? Your contention makes little sense, considering that the Note 9 uses the same processor as the Galaxy S9, and it was slower then in every regard, including intangibles, than the iPhone X.

    Funnily, I have an old Kit Kat Galaxy Note 4 right here. Word opened in 8 seconds on the 2018 iPad, and I stopped counting at 30 for the Note.

    More tests are coming.
    edited August 2018 StrangeDaysmwhitecaladanianclaire1king editor the grateracerhomie3lolliverbb-15redgeminipaorthicon
  • Reply 7 of 45
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,071member
    WLee said:
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,
    Plenty of real world tests show the iOS devices smoking Samsungs, and outright looping them. 

    Troll harder, bro. 
    mwhitedonth8caladanianbackstabclaire1racerhomie3chasmlolliverbb-15redgeminipa
  • Reply 8 of 45
    donth8donth8 Posts: 28member
    Mike, can you guys do an export test with Adobe Clips? That is a real world test that should show the real gap. Also opening big games like Injustice 2 and Mortal Kombat X would be great. Thank you.


    irelandlolliverredgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,678member
    donth8 said:
    Mike, can you guys do an export test with Adobe Clips? That is a real world test that should show the real gap. Also opening big games like Injustice 2 and Mortal Kombat X would be great. Thank you.
    [image]
    1) They also need to make sure it's the same frame rate and video codec when doing the tests.

    2) Is this Samsung device still limited to only 5 minutes of [email protected] video?
    edited August 2018 redgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 45
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,339administrator
    donth8 said:
    Mike, can you guys do an export test with Adobe Clips? That is a real world test that should show the real gap. Also opening big games like Injustice 2 and Mortal Kombat X would be great. Thank you.


    I'll toss your suggestion to the video crew.
    claire1racerhomie3lolliverbb-15redgeminipaspace2001watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 45
    donth8donth8 Posts: 28member
    I'll toss your suggestion to the video crew.
    Thanks!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 45
    WLee said:
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,


    I want the gaming websites to test graphics cards using my new method. It goes like this:


    Launch a game. When it finally gets to the main screen, exit the game without playing. Then launch another game, and exit when it gets to the main screen. Do this numerous times for multiple games. Make sure to do this two times and record the overall time as well as the time for each "lap". Whichever PC does this faster has the superior graphics card.

    Now think for a second how stupid this sounds. When gamers test video cards they actually PLAY the games. They play them at multiple resolutions (1080P, 1440P or 2160P). They play the games with varying detail settings. They play the games at different anti-aliasing (AA) settings. They will measure the FPS at each of these combinations with multiple games. Then they will crunch the numbers and come up with a rating for a video card.

    The only reason Android fanboys like these stupid "App race" tests on YouTube is because it's the only way they can come up with the occasional win against an iPhone.

    Sorry, but anyone who thinks those are legitimate tests is an idiot.
    donth8claire1king editor the grateracerhomie3lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 45
    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?
    Because getting whooped by an 11-mothn old tech is a lot more painful/enjoyable.
    edited August 2018 backstabclaire1king editor the gratelolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 45
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,471member
    WLee said:
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,
    Actually, no. 
    bb-15watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 45
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    Instead of reading numbers in an article, I'd prefer a simple graph, with some side notes. Thanks!
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 45
    donth8donth8 Posts: 28member
    WLee said:
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,


    I want the gaming websites to test graphics cards using my new method. It goes like this:


    Launch a game. When it finally gets to the main screen, exit the game without playing. Then launch another game, and exit when it gets to the main screen. Do this numerous times for multiple games. Make sure to do this two times and record the overall time as well as the time for each "lap". Whichever PC does this faster has the superior graphics card.

    Now think for a second how stupid this sounds. When gamers test video cards they actually PLAY the games. They play them at multiple resolutions (1080P, 1440P or 2160P). They play the games with varying detail settings. They play the games at different anti-aliasing (AA) settings. They will measure the FPS at each of these combinations with multiple games. Then they will crunch the numbers and come up with a rating for a video card.

    The only reason Android fanboys like these stupid "App race" tests on YouTube is because it's the only way they can come up with the occasional win against an iPhone.

    Sorry, but anyone who thinks those are legitimate tests is an idiot.
    HAHA well said, the main reason Android wins sometimes at these tests is because they ship out of the box with accelerated animations. I have been begging Apple for years to give us the option turn them off completely not just reduce motion with the same lag.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 45
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,471member

    Soli said:
    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?

    Because it's not fair to compare Apples latest to Samsungs latest.
    How is it not fair? These are the latest devices from these companies. When the next iPhone is out it will surely be tested against this Samsung device and others. There's no skullduggery here and there's nothing atypical about comparing current devices.
    Well, no.  It’s not appropriate. The problem is that web sites rush these comparisons out. Do they need to? No, they don’t. They could wait a month to get it right. Besides, the iPhone X is not intended to compete with a Note. A better comparison is the S9 non Note series. This year, with the large iPhone, the comparison will be more apt, particularly if it does have Pencil support, though I’d like to see a shorter Pencil too.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 45
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,678member
    melgross said:

    Soli said:
    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?

    Because it's not fair to compare Apples latest to Samsungs latest.
    How is it not fair? These are the latest devices from these companies. When the next iPhone is out it will surely be tested against this Samsung device and others. There's no skullduggery here and there's nothing atypical about comparing current devices.
    Well, no.  It’s not appropriate. The problem is that web sites rush these comparisons out. Do they need to? No, they don’t. They could wait a month to get it right. Besides, the iPhone X is not intended to compete with a Note. A better comparison is the S9 non Note series. This year, with the large iPhone, the comparison will be more apt, particularly if it does have Pencil support, though I’d like to see a shorter Pencil too.
    1) So they should wait a month to test it against the iPhone X? If you mean the next iPhone coming out in a month, then that would be rushing that review since it had just come out. What about this review is not competent or seemed rushed to you?

    2) I don't know when they got their hands on the Note 9 but it launches tomorrow so I assume they've been testing it for at least a week and today is the day they're allowed to  post their review.
    edited August 2018 lolliver
  • Reply 19 of 45
    claire1claire1 Posts: 494unconfirmed, member
    So we expect a knockoff iPhone to be faster than a year old iPhone?

    WLee said:
    Still hiding behind benchmarks lol! Try a real world test, you know the kind many reviewers do on YouTube, with app and ram tests and battery. In all of those the note smokes the x with laughable ease. Without exagerration, I have an old Samsung kitkat device and an iPad 2018, the kitkat device opens word quicker than the iPad, how is that acceptable. Benchmarks mean zilch real world is what matters and iOS does not thrive there,

    The knockoffs get smoked by the iPhone 8 in real world tests so nice try.
    Aren't specs and benchmarks what the iKnockoff fans usually praise?

    Hmmm....

    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?

    Because it's unfair to test 2018 iPhones to 2018 knockoffs. It's kinda like a 5th grader being inducted into WWE before he gets more training and grows into an adult.

    I saw someone comparing an iPhone 6 to a S8 and the iPhone 6 barely beat it in real world tests.

    I also saw Samsung comparing an iPhone 6(2014) to an S9(2018)





    Even Samsung agrees.
    sweetheart777StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 45
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,471member
    Soli said:
    melgross said:

    Soli said:
    sunman42 said:
    OK, I'll bite. Why run a comparison with an 11-month old Apple device instead of waiting for the new models next month?

    Because it's not fair to compare Apples latest to Samsungs latest.
    How is it not fair? These are the latest devices from these companies. When the next iPhone is out it will surely be tested against this Samsung device and others. There's no skullduggery here and there's nothing atypical about comparing current devices.
    Well, no.  It’s not appropriate. The problem is that web sites rush these comparisons out. Do they need to? No, they don’t. They could wait a month to get it right. Besides, the iPhone X is not intended to compete with a Note. A better comparison is the S9 non Note series. This year, with the large iPhone, the comparison will be more apt, particularly if it does have Pencil support, though I’d like to see a shorter Pencil too.
    1) So they should wait a month to test it against the iPhone X? If you mean the next iPhone coming out in a month, then that would be rushing that review since it had just come out. What about this review is not competent or seemed rushed to you?

    2) I don't know when they got their hands on the Note 9 but it launches tomorrow so I assume they've been testing it for at least a week and today is the day they're allowed to  post their review.
    Rushed because you shouldn’t review a phone that just now becoming available, to a phone that’s 11 months old, and is shortly being replaced as the flagship within 3 weeks. A phone that isn’t even intended to compete directly against the Note. If the Note came out three months ago, it would have made more sense. And why would they compare it to an iPhone X a month from now? Where do you get that idea from?

    i see other sites do it, but the comparison isn’t comparing like to like.
    edited August 2018
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