iPhone X versus Samsung Galaxy Note 9: Which phone for 'Fortnite' gaming?

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 11
The arrival of "Fortnite" in beta on the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 now means there's an Android-based competitor to the iPhone X for mobile gameplay. AppleInsider tries out both versions to see which smartphone you should play the hit game on.



Performance Differences

On the inside, the Galaxy Note 9 is packing the same Qualcomm 845 processor that's included in the Galaxy S9. It's an eight-core CPU that consists of four efficiency cores and four performance cores, running at up to 2.8GHz. In comparison, the iPhone X has a six-core processor that contains four efficiency cores and two high-performance cores that can run to a slightly lower maximum speed of 2.39GHz.




The Note 9 has the same Adreno 630 graphics chip as the Galaxy S9 and S9+, which Qualcomm says is 30 percent faster, 30 percent more efficient and has 2.5 times the display throughput than the graphics chip used in the Note 8.

At the Note 9's launch event, Samsung also put a huge emphasis on their new water-carbon cooling system and how it prevents overheating, which in theory would allow the Note 9 to stay cooler for longer.

For testing, "Fortnite" was fully updated on both devices, and to push each device harder, we used each smartphone's screen recording facility at the same time.




Both phones are also charged to maximum battery capacity, with the brightness of the display set to their respective maximums. We also made sure to close all background applications as well.

iPhone X "Fortnite" Experience

In the "Fortnite" settings, we've set the quality to High. For some reason, the Epic quality option is greyed out, even after the latest update which fixed iOS performance issues. We're also playing at 30 frames per second.

After jumping into a Battle Royale match, we noticed that gameplay was exceptional, with only one instance of frames dropping, and that was at the time of jumping off the bus. Previously, there would be dropped frames all over the place, causing issues with gameplay and making it difficult to play competitively.




The auto-aim system was found to be annoying after a couple of firefights, with it preventing players from accurately aiming at times.

Even in firefights, we're not seeing any dropped frames at all. This a huge improvement over the previous "Fortnite" update version. We then tested screen recording, and to be completely honest, we didn't notice any hits to gameplay smoothness. This is what we love about
iOS 11's screen recording feature, as it barely uses any resources.




After playing for around 25 minutes, our battery life on the iPhone X was at 85%, which isn't too bad since our brightness was set to maximum.

"Fortnite" on Note 9

One huge difference is the screen size, which makes "Fortnite" more immersive on the Note 9. There's also no notch to deal with, and the curved edges really help reduce bezels.




We unfortunately didn't get any graphics settings while in the lobby, however while in game, we were able to adjust the settings and set the graphics to high. We chose not to use Epic, since the iPhone X is limited to High graphics.

The Android version seems to be an exact copy of the iOS version. You don't miss out on any features at all.

In-game, the Note 9 seems to be just as smooth as the iPhone X. We did notice a few more dropped frames when jumping off the bus, but other than that, it's perfectly playable.




We also noticed that the UI on the Note 9 is a little bit larger, while still further from the center of the screen. This makes it easier to use, while also making it harder to accidentally tap on buttons like the one for aiming down the sights.

After turning on screen recording, we didn't really notice any performance hits either. There may have been more dropped frames, but relatively few overall.

Before the new update, screen recording made the game absolutely unplayable, with frame rates dropping to around 5 to 8 FPS while in a firefight. Once we stopped recording, it went back to normal.

After the recent update, this issue was fixed, however, we noticed a new issue. When we adjusted volume while recording, there was quite a bit of lag before the adjustment actually happened, in the region of 10 seconds or more.

This was very annoying since I kept trying to make it louder, and 15 seconds later it would be at maximum volume from clicking so many times. After stopping the recording, it all went back to normal.




Gameplay was very smooth, just like on the iPhone X. We observed that the Note 9's display is more saturated, and colors really pop compared to the iPhone X. On top of that, we noticed that the screen is a little bit brighter than the iPhone X as well.

We tried out Epic quality settings, and it definitely looked a bit sharper and more detailed, with little in terms of lost performance either. There may have been a few more dropped frames, but nothing too serious or noticeable.

Hopefully the issues with the iPhone X not allowing you to choose Epic graphics settings will be fixed soon.

After around the same amount of "Fortnite" gameplay, the Note 9 was at 84% battery life, in the same ballpark as the iPhone X.

Performance Royale

Both phones did a really great job in terms of performance. Gameplay was very smooth, even while screen recording. They looked basically the same, except the Note 9's increased saturation made it look a bit more pleasing than the iPhone X.

We noticed that the UI was larger on the Note 9, making it a bit easier to play. The larger screen and missing notch definitely helped as well.




The iPhone X, overall, did better than the Note 9 because of the Note 9's issues with adjusting the volume while recording. However, the Epic settings option was greyed out on the iPhone X, while it was available on the Note 9.

Either way, both of these issues should be fixed eventually, so when it comes down to it, both phones are great for playing games.

In terms of battery life, they were both similar as well, with neither phone performing better than the other. In terms of heat output, both phones warmed up a bit, but also not more than the other.

So if you want to start playing demanding games like "Fortnite", both the iPhone X and the Note 9 are exceptional options for you. Gameplay is incredibly smooth with minimal frame drops, something that you wouldn't expect to see on many other mobile devices.

Where to buy

Shoppers looking to purchase the Samsung Galaxy Note9 or iPhone X can take advantage of special offers at wireless carriers and electronics retailers.

For those that want to purchase the Note 9 outright, Samsung is offering customers a free Duo wireless charger and your choice of a Galaxy Note9 cover. B&H also stocks the phone with free expedited shipping within the contiguous U.S. and no sales tax outside New York and New Jersey*.

Wireless carrier AT&T is also offering a buy one, get one 75% off promotion on the Note 9.

For iPhone X buyers, AT&T Wireless is offering $700 off a second iPhone X with qualifying plans and conditions. The devices are also available on eBay, often at a discount.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 30
    Notch in the way? Couldn't you just turn the X around and have the notch on the right side, under your thumb and with no info to obscure? Or does the game itself choose left/right sides?
    edited September 11 watto_cobracrosslad
  • Reply 2 of 30
    Still wondering what the hell is the appeal of Fortnite anyway? Then again, the whole Pokémon app craze was a bit goofy also.
    jbdragontmayevilutionguscatwatto_cobrahammeroftruth
  • Reply 3 of 30
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,293member
    Is there some unwritten rule that when comparing competing devices the reviewer always winds saying both products are great and it depends on your personal preferences? Because that's what I see on most tech websites that do device comparisons. I'd say that ad revenue has something to do with it but Apple typically doesn't advertise on tech blogs at all. We see Samsung ads on Apple centric tech blogs all the time, including AI. So if a reviewer trashes Samsung too much the site might lose advertising dollars? I also noticed in this comparison the reviewer did not mention the fact that Fortnite can only be side loaded on an Android device and is therefore more vulnerable to having malware installed along with it.
    edited September 11 watto_cobraCarnage
  • Reply 4 of 30
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,862member
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    bb-15jbdragonSpamSandwichguscatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 30
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,041member
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    edited September 11 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 30
    Looks like both do pretty well.

    the next iPhones showing tomorrow should take it to another level over the Samsung.

    some do not care for over saturated screens as do I for phots and videos but they are actually pretty good for games.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 30
    samrodsamrod Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    Just curious, are you two main AI reviewers brothers? Also, for the first time, I finally saw you break from your serious AI presenter speak into regular human speak during the game play. You and (I assume) your bro do great reviews (he's dresses better), but you both can be slightly less serious. Maybe a drink or a joint before the review videos? A technical note: if the Samsung consumed 16% of a much larger capacity battery in the same amount of time than the iPhone X consumed 15% of a smaller one, then that game is drawing serious power. But that's to be expected given that one's running in the DART JVM while the other is natively compiled code and has the Metal GPU framework.
    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 30
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,862member
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    jbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 30
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,041member
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    Mel, ignore all these tests of processors and such that supposedly prove the superiority of "this" over "that". They don't prove anything, useful as a guideline and not much else. Real life users of both the iPhone X and "flagship" Android models don't report much if any performance difference. Go to a site like Android Central who counts a number of iOS users in its membership and where the platform is highly regarded to see what kind of experiences they actually report. 
    Carnage
  • Reply 10 of 30
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,862member
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    Mel, ignore all these tests of processors and such that supposedly prove the superiority of "this" over "that". They don't prove anything, useful as a guideline and not much else. Real life users of both the iPhone X and "flagship" Android models don't report much if any performance difference. Go to a site like Android Central who counts a number of iOS users in its membership and where the platform is highly regarded to see what kind of experiences they actually report. 
    It’s very interesting that at times, over the years, you try to show that Apple’s things perform badly, but when they perform better, you dat to ignore it. There’s no reason to ignore significantly better performance. It impacts everything. I’d rather go to anandtech or ARS to read their reviews. Those are pretty thoughtful and completely, including a good time of usage. But, even those are beginning to conceal some performance differences by using apps that are not for both, even though they are available for that purpose. The difference in performance is getting wider, not closer.
    anton zuykovlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 30
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,041member
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    Mel, ignore all these tests of processors and such that supposedly prove the superiority of "this" over "that". They don't prove anything, useful as a guideline and not much else. Real life users of both the iPhone X and "flagship" Android models don't report much if any performance difference. Go to a site like Android Central who counts a number of iOS users in its membership and where the platform is highly regarded to see what kind of experiences they actually report. 
    It’s very interesting that at times, over the years, you try to show that Apple’s things perform badly, but when they perform better, you dat to ignore it. There’s no reason to ignore significantly better performance. It impacts everything. I’d rather go to anandtech or ARS to read their reviews. Those are pretty thoughtful and completely, including a good time of usage. But, even those are beginning to conceal some performance differences by using apps that are not for both, even though they are available for that purpose. The difference in performance is getting wider, not closer.
    I've NEVER tried to show any Apple product performed badly. Not once. If you don't want to look that's on you, but discounting the actual real-life experience of side-by-side users of both platforms in favor of specs seems silly to me if you're trying to discern the practical differences. 
    edited September 11 Carnage
  • Reply 12 of 30
    Big selling point of Apple Watch Series 4 will be being able to play Fortnite on it. 
    sweetheart777watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 30
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    Mel, ignore all these tests of processors and such that supposedly prove the superiority of "this" over "that".
    Indeed. Ignore those things! They "supposedly" "factually" "prove" almost nonexistent "difference"! lol /s
    The reality is - those tests are real world tests showing use cases and the difference in performance.
    The notion that "synthetic" test results or these results have no real world meaning, is wrong. If the test case is meaningful in testing a particular workflow, than it is meaningful. And if it is an often used workflow, then the same difference will be observed in the real world too. It is as simple as that.
    edited September 11 tmaygatorguywatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 30
    Neither, play it on an iPad, it's so much easier to see everything and plays very well.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 30
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 30,862member
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    Mel, ignore all these tests of processors and such that supposedly prove the superiority of "this" over "that". They don't prove anything, useful as a guideline and not much else. Real life users of both the iPhone X and "flagship" Android models don't report much if any performance difference. Go to a site like Android Central who counts a number of iOS users in its membership and where the platform is highly regarded to see what kind of experiences they actually report. 
    It’s very interesting that at times, over the years, you try to show that Apple’s things perform badly, but when they perform better, you dat to ignore it. There’s no reason to ignore significantly better performance. It impacts everything. I’d rather go to anandtech or ARS to read their reviews. Those are pretty thoughtful and completely, including a good time of usage. But, even those are beginning to conceal some performance differences by using apps that are not for both, even though they are available for that purpose. The difference in performance is getting wider, not closer.
    I've NEVER tried to show any Apple product performed badly. Not once. If you don't want to look that's on you, but discounting the actual real-life experience of side-by-side users of both platforms in favor of specs seems silly to me if you're trying to discern the practical differences. 
    It only seems silly to you when it’s in Apple’s favor.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 30
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,041member
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    gatorguy said:
    melgross said:
    Here we go again. Compare a phone about to discontinued in a few days with a phone thats new, and which performs better? Just can’t wait another week or two for this to be done with Apple’s new product,
    Mel, I don't think the performance differences are nearly as evident as they once were. Commenters I see who use both platforms (and it seems it's not uncommon) indicate it's more personal preference anymore rather than impactful performance or OS differences. 
    So we should see a comparison between Apple’s new 6.5” model and last year’s Samsung S8? That would be fair? No, it wouldn’t. And this isn’t either. Even though Apple’s older phones outperform the newest Samsung, which is why Samsung had to compare the 9 against an iPhone 6 in their latest commercials, it still isn’t fair. And since no one really knows exactly what the new phone will do, or how well, what your saying isn’t known, but performance isn’t close, and hasn’t been.

    a writer said last year that Android devices are rated on a curve. So while it might be tenure that relative to each other, in their flagship models, there isn’t much difference (there is), there’s a lot more difference between Android phones and iPhones. Sometimes so much so that they don’t use testing apps across the spectrum that work with both, so that direct comparisons can’t be made, even though there are Apple that will do so.
    Mel, ignore all these tests of processors and such that supposedly prove the superiority of "this" over "that". They don't prove anything, useful as a guideline and not much else. Real life users of both the iPhone X and "flagship" Android models don't report much if any performance difference. Go to a site like Android Central who counts a number of iOS users in its membership and where the platform is highly regarded to see what kind of experiences they actually report. 
    It’s very interesting that at times, over the years, you try to show that Apple’s things perform badly, but when they perform better, you dat to ignore it. There’s no reason to ignore significantly better performance. It impacts everything. I’d rather go to anandtech or ARS to read their reviews. Those are pretty thoughtful and completely, including a good time of usage. But, even those are beginning to conceal some performance differences by using apps that are not for both, even though they are available for that purpose. The difference in performance is getting wider, not closer.
    I've NEVER tried to show any Apple product performed badly. Not once. If you don't want to look that's on you, but discounting the actual real-life experience of side-by-side users of both platforms in favor of specs seems silly to me if you're trying to discern the practical differences. 
    It only seems silly to you when it’s in Apple’s favor.
    Again with more silliness, attributing yet more fictious stuff about things I've not done.  Geesh Mel.
    Carnage
  • Reply 17 of 30
    pm42 said:
    Neither, play it on an iPad, it's so much easier to see everything and plays very well.
    Or take it all the way home and play it on your Mac ;)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 30
    CobraGuy said:
    Looks like both do pretty well.

    the next iPhones showing tomorrow should take it to another level over the Samsung.

    some do not care for over saturated screens as do I for phots and videos but they are actually pretty good for games.
    Maybe that's because oversaturated screens like the Samsung ones look like games.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 30
     fully updated on both devices, and to push each device harder, we used each smartphone's screen recording facility at the same time.




    Both phones are also charged to maximum battery capacity, with the brightness of the display set to their respective maximums. We also made sure to close all background applications as well.

    iPhone X "Fortnite" Experience

    In the "Fortnite" settings, we've set the quality to High. For some reason, the Epic quality option is greyed out, even after the latest update which fixed iOS performance issues. We're also playing at 30 frames per second.

    After jumping into a Battle Royale match, we noticed that gameplay was exceptional, with only one instance of frames dropping, and that was at the time of jumping off the bus. Previously, there would be dropped frames all over the place, causing issues with gameplay and making it difficult to play competitively.




    The auto-aim system was found to be annoying after a couple of firefights, with it preventing players from accurately aiming at times.

    Even in firefights, we're not seeing any dropped frames at all. This a huge improvement over the previous "Fortnite" update version. We then tested screen recording, and to be completely honest, we didn't notice any hits to gameplay smoothness. This is what we love about
    iOS 11's screen recording feature,

    There's an anchor tag (<a>) with no href set for the entire text I've quoted above, which seems to close after the link to "iOS 11's screen recording feature". So the text is blue and changes colour when you hover over it.


    You need to remove the tag.

    edited September 12
  • Reply 20 of 30
    I thought this site was AppleInsider – not JumpShipToSamsungInsider. Being balanced and fair is one thing, but can't we keep things in perspective, please? This is NOT a site about choosing between competing platforms, and I'm getting truly, heartily sick of reading comparisons between iPhones and the latest Samsung here – especially when they INVARIABLY seem to come down on the side of Samsung. Before reading this article, I'd have put money on its conclusion being either that the two phones are equal or that the Samsung has the edge over the iPhone. This site is read by Apple fans, a lot of whom despise Samsung with a passion. (I'm one of them. I accept that Samsung makes many fine products and components, but its morals and business practices turn my stomach, and I'll NEVER buy a Samsung-branded product on principle.) And this site is SUPPOSED to be about Apple, not Samsung. It's not a general-purpose phone-comparison site; it's a site about Apple and Apple-related products. Beside, why the obsession with Samsung in particular? The stories about Samsung here seem endless, yet there's no similar concentration on other Android makers. Covering Apple's relationship with Samsung is all very well (the court cases etc.), but I'm sick to death of seeing reviews and comparisons involving Samsung's top phones and tablets here, especially when this site seems to bend over backwards to portray them in a wonderful light and to the detriment of the Apple products that it's supposed to be interested in. I'm here because I like Apple. Even if I didn't despise Samsung (which I do), I wouldn't be very interested in its products because I have no interest in jumping ship to Android. So WHY is there this CONSTANT banging on about whether readers should buy the iPhone X or the latest potential fire-hazard from Samsung? If the Samsung's camera is marginally better than the iPhones, then frankly that's irritating and I don't really know about it (though in real terms it's also totally inconsequential). And if you're going to do a head-to-head with the same game on both platforms, why not show a game that actually demonstrates how the iPhone X has significantly better performance than the Samsung in terms of both processor and graphics (which it does)? You know, instead of falsely making out that ANY Samsung phone is on a level with the iPhone for performance? This latest article is both irritating and misleading, and is excessively pro-Samsung on a supposedly Apple site. It's the latest in a long trend towards such articles, and they're starting to make me question why I'm reading and supporting AppleInsider. I'm here for Apple news, not to have the supposed wonders of Samsung shoved down my throat every other minute. There's plenty of other sites where I can be brainwashed about Samsung, thank you very much. Get your act together, please, AppleInsider, or you'll start losing readers.
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