CBC Video claims Apple's repair policies are abusive, but 'proof' falls far short

12467

Comments

  • Reply 61 of 124
    dewme said:
    [...] That's not objective reporting. Appealing to emotions and feelings is the lifeblood of propaganda.
    To be fair to CBC, those weren't the reporter's words. That was one of their interview subjects. Objective reporting requires not censoring interview subjects.

    Of course it ALSO requires telling both sides of the story, and CBC's report didn't strike me as doing that in this case.
    radarthekatstompymuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 62 of 124

    Who's CBC, and frankly, why should we care?
    CBC = Canadian national broadcaster for both radio and TV

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Broadcasting_Corporation
    I forgot to add a ‘/sarcasm’ tag...
    CBC is a national broadcaster with a good reputation (which is part of why this particular story is so surprising). Why would you be dismissive of its work?
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 63 of 124

    Maybe Apple should sell phones with no warranty at all and then you could get it serviced/fixed where ever you choose...
    I don't know what you think you read, but it clearly wasn't what I wrote. Maybe you should read it again.

    What I said is that I value and appreciate the kind of service Apple offers. I *also* think there's a place for less stringent, more affordable alternatives in cases where the age and/or application of a particular device doesn't warrant as thorough a remedy as an expensive Apple repair would provide.

    The existence of the latter doesn't compromise the former.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 64 of 124
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,725administrator
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    It's not the first time I see a dismissive and pro-Apple editorial article from Appleinsider and this is unfortunate because at the heart of CBS's message is something all of us should be able to agree on, this is the exact quote that CBS ends its article:

    "Silicon Valley has been bribing the US economy for years now, but there is growing scrutiny on the questionable business practices of Apple and other star companies here, and a growing movement to make them more accountable to consumers."

    I actually saw the CBS clip and I was surprised to see not just a couple of fringe cases as Appleinsider suggests, but a number of disturbing facts that we all know to be true.

    "Right to repair" 100% genuine concern and valid and it's shameful Apple is on the opposite side of this given their "green" focus.

    Questionable business practices such as Apple slowing down iPhones up to 70% and not telling users for almost 1 year that this had been happening qualifies 100% as questionable business practices, ESPECIALLY when genius bar people were recommending users to buy a new iPhone instead.

    Instead of taking the CBS video and supporting it for right to repair, and making Apple accountable for issues such as Error 53, and throttlegate, Appleinside tries to dismiss CBS story and side with Apple. Shameful.
    So, if I've read this right, it's "shameful" that we wrote an editorial (that it appears you didn't read) that disagrees with you.

    We aren't against Right to Repair as a whole, not are we unabashedly supporters of all of it, because there are massive security implications behind it. If you read the article, you'd know that it fully praises iFixit and Rossmann, and what they do. Most of the AI staff has been on that side of the counter.

    What we're wholeheartedly against is factually light low-quality hit-pieces -- which is precisely what the CBC article is.

    CBS showed BOTH iFixit's founder and Rossman receiving legal threats when they share schematics or repair manuals from Apple, and how they were collaborating with lawmakers to push for right to repair legislation. CBS spends a LARGE part of the documentary showing iFixit and Rossman explain how important the right to repair is so that they can keep helping others repair their devices. You acknowledge iFixit and Rossman but then you state "CBC's implication that Apple should source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent is ludicrous" I went back to the CBS video and could not find that conclusion ANYWHERE after rewatching it. CBS shows extensively how important right to repair is, I don't see supporting evidence of your claim that CBS was trying to imply something else. If anything it seems very disingenuous from you that even after you cite iFixit and Rossman's stance, that you don't acknowledge the real conclusion/implication, which is more transparency, and even Rossman's own wishes shown in the CBS video is that Apple just stops suing him when he shares technical documentation. Neither Rossman nor iFixit even remotely hint and the ridiculous idea of to "source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent"
    You're welcome to believe what you want, but -- and correct me if I'm wrong -- but I don't feel like you've ever worked at a high-volume service center.

    CBC is absolutely implying they should have multiple Rossman-grade techs at every store. That's how the "bent pin" gets found, versus following the repair procedure that Apple promulgates, which starts with "check the moisture sensors for indication."
    First of all I appreciate staff for replying to feedback, many publications don't do it or care about it. With regards to the bent pin, the reason Rossman was able to find it is because there is documentation pointing out that it's the backlight pin. This supports the argument they are pushing for, getting documentation and not being sued for it, so that shops or individuals outside of Apple can make these types of repairs.

    If I may humbly point out that if Appleinsider is boldly going to call out CBC for lack of 'proof', it seems to me you are also being scrutinized when you are so dismissive by rounding up iFixit's and Rossman's testimony and concluding something that you think to be 'implied' but I honestly can't see any evidence supporting that. In fact there is such a large segment of them talking about right to repair, being sued for technical documents, Apple using proprietary screws/glue etc, and other details which is actually the 'proof' that the real focus of CBC's piece is right to repair, and accountability, and not the implication that Appleinsider is referring to.


    We're generally friendly here at AI.

    Anyway, a pentalobe screw is hardly a proprietary one, though. It is not an Apple-specific screw. For the last 10 years at least, I've been able to get them at Home Depot. I know this, because I needed to get a piece of rice out of a Gameboy Advance, and the best way to do that was to take the back cover off. Regarding glue, given the public's -- note I didn't say AI readers -- demand for thinner and more reliable devices, this is how they, Samsung, Google, LG, HTC, and everybody else gets there,

    I completely understand what AI readers want. I also understand that we are not the average consumer of these products, and not by a long shot. More importantly, so does Apple.

    One MacBook Pro, supplied to one Genius, at one Apple store is hardly an exhaustive research piece, nor is it proof of anything other than that one genius at that one store followed the procedure for repair to the letter. That bent pin? It is about step 18 of the troubleshooting manual. Water damage trips are step one after taking the cover off.
    edited October 10 radarthekat
  • Reply 65 of 124
    Scot1 said:
    This doesn’t surprise me. Marketplace (a “consumer watchdog” show also made by CBC also runs highly biased shows. 
    I disagree. CBC is generally the best non partisan news because it’s not reliant on any commercial interests. Marketplace has exposed many frauds and provided consumers with valuable information over the years to make informed decisions. 
    That's true. This case may be a little different though. Usually Marketplace stories centre around clearly unethical business practices for which there is no defence, like fraudulent automotive sales and repairs. In this case there are some "double-edged sword" issues that should have been addressed, for example how throttling may actually benefit consumers and third-party home buttons could compromise security. The report did a poor job of presenting how SOME repair issues are not black and white.

    But you're right, that's not typical of CBC reporting, and is exactly why people like us are surprised and disappointed. This story doesn't live up to the standard we've come to expect from CBC.
    radarthekatmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 66 of 124
    The problem shown in the video is very common. Apple doesnt accept this under warranty. There is a petition related to this issue.
    edited October 10
  • Reply 67 of 124
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,725administrator
    alex.p said:
    The problem shown in the video is very common. Apple doesnt accept this under warranty. There is a petition related to this issue.
    This isn't that. The machine shown in the video is a 2015 or earlier. And, the stage lighting in the 2016 and later is nowhere near common -- we got data on it while we were doing the keyboard failure rate info.
    edited October 10
  • Reply 68 of 124
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,469member
    Scot1 said:
    This doesn’t surprise me. Marketplace (a “consumer watchdog” show also made by CBC also runs highly biased shows. 
    I disagree. CBC is generally the best non partisan news because it’s not reliant on any commercial interests. Marketplace has exposed many frauds and provided consumers with valuable information over the years to make informed decisions. 
    CBC and "non partisan" do not belong in the same sentence.
    entropys
  • Reply 69 of 124
    alex.p said:
    The problem shown in the video is very common. Apple doesnt accept this under warranty. There is a petition related to this issue.
    This isn't that. The machine shown in the video is a 2015 or earlier. And, the stage lighting in the 2016 and later is nowhere near common -- we got data on it while we were doing the keyboard failure rate info.
    My bad, I thought it was 2016 or newer (actually didn't watch the video at that moment).
    When exactly you got the data? In this case time is matters a lot. I suppose that most of the owners just think they are alone with this problem and carry their shiny bricks to the Apple Store where they get a brainwash session.
  • Reply 70 of 124
    brucemc said:
    Scot1 said:
    This doesn’t surprise me. Marketplace (a “consumer watchdog” show also made by CBC also runs highly biased shows. 
    I disagree. CBC is generally the best non partisan news because it’s not reliant on any commercial interests. Marketplace has exposed many frauds and provided consumers with valuable information over the years to make informed decisions. 
    CBC and "non partisan" do not belong in the same sentence.
    I'm curious why you feel that way, because I haven't found CBC reporting to be either pro-left or pro-right. The manner in which government activity is reported hasn't changed much in the last few years, despite a change from a conservative government to liberal.
  • Reply 71 of 124
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,256member
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    It's not the first time I see a dismissive and pro-Apple editorial article from Appleinsider and this is unfortunate because at the heart of CBS's message is something all of us should be able to agree on, this is the exact quote that CBS ends its article:

    "Silicon Valley has been bribing the US economy for years now, but there is growing scrutiny on the questionable business practices of Apple and other star companies here, and a growing movement to make them more accountable to consumers."

    I actually saw the CBS clip and I was surprised to see not just a couple of fringe cases as Appleinsider suggests, but a number of disturbing facts that we all know to be true.

    "Right to repair" 100% genuine concern and valid and it's shameful Apple is on the opposite side of this given their "green" focus.

    Questionable business practices such as Apple slowing down iPhones up to 70% and not telling users for almost 1 year that this had been happening qualifies 100% as questionable business practices, ESPECIALLY when genius bar people were recommending users to buy a new iPhone instead.

    Instead of taking the CBS video and supporting it for right to repair, and making Apple accountable for issues such as Error 53, and throttlegate, Appleinside tries to dismiss CBS story and side with Apple. Shameful.
    So, if I've read this right, it's "shameful" that we wrote an editorial (that it appears you didn't read) that disagrees with you.

    We aren't against Right to Repair as a whole, not are we unabashedly supporters of all of it, because there are massive security implications behind it. If you read the article, you'd know that it fully praises iFixit and Rossmann, and what they do. Most of the AI staff has been on that side of the counter.

    What we're wholeheartedly against is factually light low-quality hit-pieces -- which is precisely what the CBC article is.

    CBS showed BOTH iFixit's founder and Rossman receiving legal threats when they share schematics or repair manuals from Apple, and how they were collaborating with lawmakers to push for right to repair legislation. CBS spends a LARGE part of the documentary showing iFixit and Rossman explain how important the right to repair is so that they can keep helping others repair their devices. You acknowledge iFixit and Rossman but then you state "CBC's implication that Apple should source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent is ludicrous" I went back to the CBS video and could not find that conclusion ANYWHERE after rewatching it. CBS shows extensively how important right to repair is, I don't see supporting evidence of your claim that CBS was trying to imply something else. If anything it seems very disingenuous from you that even after you cite iFixit and Rossman's stance, that you don't acknowledge the real conclusion/implication, which is more transparency, and even Rossman's own wishes shown in the CBS video is that Apple just stops suing him when he shares technical documentation. Neither Rossman nor iFixit even remotely hint and the ridiculous idea of to "source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent"
    You're welcome to believe what you want, but -- and correct me if I'm wrong -- but I don't feel like you've ever worked at a high-volume service center.

    CBC is absolutely implying they should have multiple Rossman-grade techs at every store. That's how the "bent pin" gets found, versus following the repair procedure that Apple promulgates, which starts with "check the moisture sensors for indication."
    First of all I appreciate staff for replying to feedback, many publications don't do it or care about it. With regards to the bent pin, the reason Rossman was able to find it is because there is documentation pointing out that it's the backlight pin. This supports the argument they are pushing for, getting documentation and not being sued for it, so that shops or individuals outside of Apple can make these types of repairs.

    If I may humbly point out that if Appleinsider is boldly going to call out CBC for lack of 'proof', it seems to me you are also being scrutinized when you are so dismissive by rounding up iFixit's and Rossman's testimony and concluding something that you think to be 'implied' but I honestly can't see any evidence supporting that. In fact there is such a large segment of them talking about right to repair, being sued for technical documents, Apple using proprietary screws/glue etc, and other details which is actually the 'proof' that the real focus of CBC's piece is right to repair, and accountability, and not the implication that Appleinsider is referring to.


    We're generally friendly here at AI.

    Anyway, a pentalobe screw is hardly a proprietary one, though. It is not an Apple-specific screw. For the last 10 years at least, I've been able to get them at Home Depot. I know this, because I needed to get a piece of rice out of a Gameboy Advance, and the best way to do that was to take the back cover off. Regarding glue, given the public's -- note I didn't say AI readers -- demand for thinner and more reliable devices, this is how they, Samsung, Google, LG, HTC, and everybody else gets there,

    I completely understand what AI readers want. I also understand that we are not the average consumer of these products, and not by a long shot. More importantly, so does Apple.

    One MacBook Pro, supplied to one Genius, at one Apple store is hardly an exhaustive research piece, nor is it proof of anything other than that one genius at that one store followed the procedure for repair to the letter. That bent pin? It is about step 18 of the troubleshooting manual. Water damage trips are step one after taking the cover off.
    Yet, at my Apple Store that pretty much describes my experience there:   Erratic and unpredictable.   It all depends on which rep you get as to what answer or kind of answer you get.   Some know what they're talking about, others just try to bully and bullshit their way through.  Some are customer centric and respect the customer and others seem to take the view that Apple is always perfect and the customer is always an asshole.   But, all of them are always polite.

    Apple needs to work on that.   That's not Apple level quality. 
    edited October 11 obiwanbill
  • Reply 72 of 124
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    It's not the first time I see a dismissive and pro-Apple editorial article from Appleinsider and this is unfortunate because at the heart of CBS's message is something all of us should be able to agree on, this is the exact quote that CBS ends its article:

    "Silicon Valley has been bribing the US economy for years now, but there is growing scrutiny on the questionable business practices of Apple and other star companies here, and a growing movement to make them more accountable to consumers."

    I actually saw the CBS clip and I was surprised to see not just a couple of fringe cases as Appleinsider suggests, but a number of disturbing facts that we all know to be true.

    "Right to repair" 100% genuine concern and valid and it's shameful Apple is on the opposite side of this given their "green" focus.

    Questionable business practices such as Apple slowing down iPhones up to 70% and not telling users for almost 1 year that this had been happening qualifies 100% as questionable business practices, ESPECIALLY when genius bar people were recommending users to buy a new iPhone instead.

    Instead of taking the CBS video and supporting it for right to repair, and making Apple accountable for issues such as Error 53, and throttlegate, Appleinside tries to dismiss CBS story and side with Apple. Shameful.
    So, if I've read this right, it's "shameful" that we wrote an editorial (that it appears you didn't read) that disagrees with you.

    We aren't against Right to Repair as a whole, not are we unabashedly supporters of all of it, because there are massive security implications behind it. If you read the article, you'd know that it fully praises iFixit and Rossmann, and what they do. Most of the AI staff has been on that side of the counter.

    What we're wholeheartedly against is factually light low-quality hit-pieces -- which is precisely what the CBC article is.

    CBS showed BOTH iFixit's founder and Rossman receiving legal threats when they share schematics or repair manuals from Apple, and how they were collaborating with lawmakers to push for right to repair legislation. CBS spends a LARGE part of the documentary showing iFixit and Rossman explain how important the right to repair is so that they can keep helping others repair their devices. You acknowledge iFixit and Rossman but then you state "CBC's implication that Apple should source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent is ludicrous" I went back to the CBS video and could not find that conclusion ANYWHERE after rewatching it. CBS shows extensively how important right to repair is, I don't see supporting evidence of your claim that CBS was trying to imply something else. If anything it seems very disingenuous from you that even after you cite iFixit and Rossman's stance, that you don't acknowledge the real conclusion/implication, which is more transparency, and even Rossman's own wishes shown in the CBS video is that Apple just stops suing him when he shares technical documentation. Neither Rossman nor iFixit even remotely hint and the ridiculous idea of to "source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent"
    You're welcome to believe what you want, but -- and correct me if I'm wrong -- but I don't feel like you've ever worked at a high-volume service center.

    CBC is absolutely implying they should have multiple Rossman-grade techs at every store. That's how the "bent pin" gets found, versus following the repair procedure that Apple promulgates, which starts with "check the moisture sensors for indication."
    First of all I appreciate staff for replying to feedback, many publications don't do it or care about it. With regards to the bent pin, the reason Rossman was able to find it is because there is documentation pointing out that it's the backlight pin. This supports the argument they are pushing for, getting documentation and not being sued for it, so that shops or individuals outside of Apple can make these types of repairs.

    If I may humbly point out that if Appleinsider is boldly going to call out CBC for lack of 'proof', it seems to me you are also being scrutinized when you are so dismissive by rounding up iFixit's and Rossman's testimony and concluding something that you think to be 'implied' but I honestly can't see any evidence supporting that. In fact there is such a large segment of them talking about right to repair, being sued for technical documents, Apple using proprietary screws/glue etc, and other details which is actually the 'proof' that the real focus of CBC's piece is right to repair, and accountability, and not the implication that Appleinsider is referring to.


    We're generally friendly here at AI.

    Anyway, a pentalobe screw is hardly a proprietary one, though. It is not an Apple-specific screw. For the last 10 years at least, I've been able to get them at Home Depot. I know this, because I needed to get a piece of rice out of a Gameboy Advance, and the best way to do that was to take the back cover off. Regarding glue, given the public's -- note I didn't say AI readers -- demand for thinner and more reliable devices, this is how they, Samsung, Google, LG, HTC, and everybody else gets there,

    I completely understand what AI readers want. I also understand that we are not the average consumer of these products, and not by a long shot. More importantly, so does Apple.

    One MacBook Pro, supplied to one Genius, at one Apple store is hardly an exhaustive research piece, nor is it proof of anything other than that one genius at that one store followed the procedure for repair to the letter. That bent pin? It is about step 18 of the troubleshooting manual. Water damage trips are step one after taking the cover off.
    Yet, at my Apple Store that pretty much describes my experience there:   Erratic and unpredictable.   It all depends on which rep you get as to what answer or kind of answer you get.   Some know what they're talking about, others just try to bully and bullshit their way through.  Some are customer centric and respect the customer and others seem to take the view that Apple is always perfect and the customer is always an asshole.   But, all of them are always polite.

    Apple needs to work on that.   That's not Apple level quality. 
    Despite whatever shortcomings may exist in consistency, I'm really glad Apple has Genius Bars at all. Who else in consumer electronics provides free face-to-face assessment? Apple's in-store service is not perfect, but in most cases it's better than shipping a device to a service centre.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 73 of 124
    [...]

    Mike and Malcolm say that the world works best when consumers have choices, including the particular brand of service Apple offers. I agree. What I'm finding troubling is Apple's trend towards trying to eliminate everything BUT its own brand of service. I appreciate Apple providing me a way to verify the security of my device after service. I do NOT appreciate Apple making it the ONLY option, which they've done with the Home button and the Mac verification routine. If I decide to compromise security to save money, like for an older device relegated to limited duty, that should be my choice. Apple is not my mom.
    Let's say you or someone else decides to compromise security to save money, then the device enters someone else's hands. At that point has that person been informed that the device they are taking possession of, is no longer as secure as they would expect? Arguably it would be better for everyone to have confidence that a second-hand Apple device is as secure as one new out the box.

    The discourse regarding repairability is much more complex than most realise, and I suspect there are many implications being overlooked amongst most of the debates that are being had.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 74 of 124
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    trifid said:
    It's not the first time I see a dismissive and pro-Apple editorial article from Appleinsider and this is unfortunate because at the heart of CBS's message is something all of us should be able to agree on, this is the exact quote that CBS ends its article:

    "Silicon Valley has been bribing the US economy for years now, but there is growing scrutiny on the questionable business practices of Apple and other star companies here, and a growing movement to make them more accountable to consumers."

    I actually saw the CBS clip and I was surprised to see not just a couple of fringe cases as Appleinsider suggests, but a number of disturbing facts that we all know to be true.

    "Right to repair" 100% genuine concern and valid and it's shameful Apple is on the opposite side of this given their "green" focus.

    Questionable business practices such as Apple slowing down iPhones up to 70% and not telling users for almost 1 year that this had been happening qualifies 100% as questionable business practices, ESPECIALLY when genius bar people were recommending users to buy a new iPhone instead.

    Instead of taking the CBS video and supporting it for right to repair, and making Apple accountable for issues such as Error 53, and throttlegate, Appleinside tries to dismiss CBS story and side with Apple. Shameful.
    So, if I've read this right, it's "shameful" that we wrote an editorial (that it appears you didn't read) that disagrees with you.

    We aren't against Right to Repair as a whole, not are we unabashedly supporters of all of it, because there are massive security implications behind it. If you read the article, you'd know that it fully praises iFixit and Rossmann, and what they do. Most of the AI staff has been on that side of the counter.

    What we're wholeheartedly against is factually light low-quality hit-pieces -- which is precisely what the CBC article is.

    CBS showed BOTH iFixit's founder and Rossman receiving legal threats when they share schematics or repair manuals from Apple, and how they were collaborating with lawmakers to push for right to repair legislation. CBS spends a LARGE part of the documentary showing iFixit and Rossman explain how important the right to repair is so that they can keep helping others repair their devices. You acknowledge iFixit and Rossman but then you state "CBC's implication that Apple should source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent is ludicrous" I went back to the CBS video and could not find that conclusion ANYWHERE after rewatching it. CBS shows extensively how important right to repair is, I don't see supporting evidence of your claim that CBS was trying to imply something else. If anything it seems very disingenuous from you that even after you cite iFixit and Rossman's stance, that you don't acknowledge the real conclusion/implication, which is more transparency, and even Rossman's own wishes shown in the CBS video is that Apple just stops suing him when he shares technical documentation. Neither Rossman nor iFixit even remotely hint and the ridiculous idea of to "source repair technicians at each store with that level of talent"
    You're welcome to believe what you want, but -- and correct me if I'm wrong -- but I don't feel like you've ever worked at a high-volume service center.

    CBC is absolutely implying they should have multiple Rossman-grade techs at every store. That's how the "bent pin" gets found, versus following the repair procedure that Apple promulgates, which starts with "check the moisture sensors for indication."
    First of all I appreciate staff for replying to feedback, many publications don't do it or care about it. With regards to the bent pin, the reason Rossman was able to find it is because there is documentation pointing out that it's the backlight pin. This supports the argument they are pushing for, getting documentation and not being sued for it, so that shops or individuals outside of Apple can make these types of repairs.

    If I may humbly point out that if Appleinsider is boldly going to call out CBC for lack of 'proof', it seems to me you are also being scrutinized when you are so dismissive by rounding up iFixit's and Rossman's testimony and concluding something that you think to be 'implied' but I honestly can't see any evidence supporting that. In fact there is such a large segment of them talking about right to repair, being sued for technical documents, Apple using proprietary screws/glue etc, and other details which is actually the 'proof' that the real focus of CBC's piece is right to repair, and accountability, and not the implication that Appleinsider is referring to.


    We're generally friendly here at AI.

    Anyway, a pentalobe screw is hardly a proprietary one, though. It is not an Apple-specific screw. For the last 10 years at least, I've been able to get them at Home Depot. I know this, because I needed to get a piece of rice out of a Gameboy Advance, and the best way to do that was to take the back cover off. Regarding glue, given the public's -- note I didn't say AI readers -- demand for thinner and more reliable devices, this is how they, Samsung, Google, LG, HTC, and everybody else gets there,

    I completely understand what AI readers want. I also understand that we are not the average consumer of these products, and not by a long shot. More importantly, so does Apple.

    One MacBook Pro, supplied to one Genius, at one Apple store is hardly an exhaustive research piece, nor is it proof of anything other than that one genius at that one store followed the procedure for repair to the letter. That bent pin? It is about step 18 of the troubleshooting manual. Water damage trips are step one after taking the cover off.
    Yet, at my Apple Store that pretty much describes my experience there:   Erratic and unpredictable.   It all depends on which rep you get as to what answer or kind of answer you get.   Some know what they're talking about, others just try to bully and bullshit their way through.  Some are customer centric and respect the customer and others seem to take the view that Apple is always perfect and the customer is always an asshole.   But, all of them are always polite.

    Apple needs to work on that.   That's not Apple level quality. 
    Despite whatever shortcomings may exist in consistency, I'm really glad Apple has Genius Bars at all. Who else in consumer electronics provides free face-to-face assessment? Apple's in-store service is not perfect, but in most cases it's better than shipping a device to a service centre.
    I agree...   Although I have considered shipping mine to a service center rather than take pot-luck at an Apple Store.   Perhaps the best is to call Apple Support first to get a reading.   They seem to be more consistent and customer oriented.
  • Reply 75 of 124
    brucemc said:
    Scot1 said:
    This doesn’t surprise me. Marketplace (a “consumer watchdog” show also made by CBC also runs highly biased shows. 
    I disagree. CBC is generally the best non partisan news because it’s not reliant on any commercial interests. Marketplace has exposed many frauds and provided consumers with valuable information over the years to make informed decisions. 
    CBC and "non partisan" do not belong in the same sentence.
    I'm curious why you feel that way, because I haven't found CBC reporting to be either pro-left or pro-right. The manner in which government activity is reported hasn't changed much in the last few years, despite a change from a conservative government to liberal.
    You find CBC to be balanced?? Whoooo boy! SMH. The CBC skews way left, and their political coverage is about as even-handed as the NY Times, WaPo (or Fox) is. They are essentially the propaganda arm of the Liberal party, but unlike the left-wing outlets in the US the CBC forces taxpayers to foot the bill for their propaganda.
    entropys
  • Reply 76 of 124
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,062member
    Apple isn't going to take the fucking computer apart and examine the board with microscopes. This would logistically be utterly impossible to do with all issues, considering their customer base. There are certain tests and guidelines that Apple Store employees follow that can be implemented at scale, and nothing that anti-Apple troll "APPLE IS SCREWING YOU!!11" Louis Rossman says or does can change that. This has nothing to do with maliciousness, and everything to do with practicality and scalability.
    ericthehalfbeeradarthekatclaire1
  • Reply 77 of 124
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,639member
    davgreg said:
    StrangeDays said:
    Poppycock. Apple devices have the longest useful lifespan on the market, and highest resell
    value, so your entire “But planned obsolescence!” theory is a crock. Apple
    devices last a long time and people are willing to pay for that. Try again, Mr Stockholder. 

    (Also, difficult for consumers or DIY tinkerers to repair is in no way the same as planned obsolescence.)
    Apple resale value is dropping and the useful lifespan has more to do with the maturity of the technology than any action taken in Cupertino.
    BTW- Apple is very good at selling yesterday's chips at tomorrow's prices.

    This is not the company Steve Jobs built, or the one he recreated after returning. It has a fashion house mentality and regular Wall Street values.
    It's not Steve's company and hasn't been since 2011 so stop living in the past. You don't know the direction Steve would have taken Apple if he were here today so just stop with the CultofSteve crap. You're only making yourself look like a fool in the end. 

    Also, show us some proof of Apple's resale value dropping. 
    edited October 21 radarthekatclaire1
  • Reply 78 of 124
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,639member
    Rayz2016 said:
    davgreg said:
    Full Disclosure: Longtime Apple cus
    NEXT!
    Yup, exactly...I cannot stand when someone thinks they have to validate themselves before they even start talking about the topic at hand as if they're above everyone else. This immediately turns me off to whatever was said afterwards.

    Either you're a customer, or you're not. It doesn't matter whether its 1yr or 10-20yrs. Either way, you're a customer and if you really didn't want to be a customer after 20yrs, you would have left and I couldn't care less if you're a shareholder or not. That doesn't really mean shit in the grand scheme of things. 

    And lastly @davgreg...please don't post everything in bold to try and make your post stand out. It's completely and utterly unnecessary. 
    edited October 21 radarthekatclaire1muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 79 of 124
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,530member
    The cognitive dissonance is ear splitting. Apple attacked for ‘abusive’ repair practices. planned obsolescence, and bait and switch yet it remains at the top for customer satisfaction, reliability, and brand reputation. In this almost eighty post thread I’ve yet to see someone explain that way.  
    radarthekatclaire1
  • Reply 80 of 124
    rcfa said:
    Apple customer satisfaction is more a function of ease of use and fundamental quality of the products, it has little to no bearing on Apple’s repair policies.

    Apple e.g. refuses to even look at my MacBook Air for repair because it has “a dangerous third party battery” in it. Nothing about that battery is dangerous, the battery that’s dangerous was the Apple supplied original, that with only 32 cycles became so bloated one couldn’t close the lid properly anymore, necessitating the emergency repair with a third party battery (which was all that was available within a useful time period). The damage the notebook has (only works without crashing if something is attached to the TB port), is likely the result of some minor damage to the main board due to the bloating.

    Similarly, until Apple finally acknowledged issues with certain iPhone 6 and 6s batteries and created the repair program, they refused to replace the batteries at a reasonable price. Going to a third party means that Apple will refuse any repairs, including the battery, because it has a third party battery in it.

    Apple’s repairs are generally much too expensive, particularly battery replacements.
    If you had the battery fail and bloat after just 32 cycles, then that should have been under warrantee. You should have gone to apple rather than picking up an aftermarket battery.
    radarthekat
Sign In or Register to comment.