CBC Video claims Apple's repair policies are abusive, but 'proof' falls far short

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  • Reply 101 of 124
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 1,794member
    AppleZulu said:
    dysamoria said:
    Also: Apple’s policies may be great for Apple and convenient for customers who need replaced devices ASAP, but they’re not good for our environment, materials usage, and the average consumer who isn’t demanding an immediate replacement (due to costs). It’s a shortcut process that makes for a lot of unnecessary waste of materials and the added impact of materials shipping.

    There was nothing wrong with having multiple Rossman-level technicians in service centers, back when it was more common in electronics repair work. Corporations making the products saw a way to increase profit margins and acted accordingly. That’s all this is about. It’s not about best serving the average customer in any way but speed. Defending the service model by saying that it’s the most efficient and cost effective for how the product is built completely misses the point.

    This business model is unsustainable and a massive level of cultural normalization of this unsustainable model has occurred. It’s being defended by people who don’t directly (or at all) reap financial benefits by supporting it, and people who argue against it are characterized as extremists, uninformed, irrational, or, like here on this forum, communist!

    Have you seen the Max Headroom TV series? A world where nothing new is made, because there aren’t enough new raw materials (or extraction of them is so wasteful and costly that society cannot tolerate it anymore)... that world is coming. It’s an inevitability, because recycling isn’t being done much at all.

    Most materials go to feeding abusively-contracted, privately owned & operated, municipally paid, toxic pollution-generating incinerators (with some of them having the gall to be called “renewable energy”), or into landfills. The regions that have banned landfilling of electronics waste have seen collection & materials-selling businesses crop up, but the waste just gets shipped out of those regions into less regulated places.

    Those “recycling robots” (the two promoted by Apple) are mere marketing curiosities that don’t actually do the real work of materials reclamation, when and where reclamation is actually done. Look outside your first-world comforts and witness the backside of the electronics waste system, operating in low-wage, low-safety workplaces. These are the places to which American corporations ship the materials and where human beings do the dangerous tear down work (or toxic incineration, once the most sellable materials have been extracted). The companies collect and ship the material for profit, not for reuse or for any environmental concern.

    The component-level refurbishment being done by electronics sellers in the USA pales in comparison to the waste they ship out of country. The material that is ultimately reclaimed is fractional.

    As an aside: Repairability isn’t some “communist” plot to rob you of your freedom (unless you feel you have a “right” to contribute to destroying the environment and wasting materials). It’s depressing just how entrenched and thoughtless the USA’s Cold War anti-USSR propaganda has been; entire generations of people (including those who didn’t live in the Cold War), are acculturated into slamming pro-society, pro-consumer, pro-environment ideas with rhetoric about “communism” and “anti-freedom”. The sheer amount of mindless, knee-jerk responses still coming from people out there, responding to issues like this, are frightening.

    Maybe CBC is promoting articles with sensationalism (which is bad, and I’m sick of seeing every media entity resorting to being little more than an ad space-selling agency that justifies click-baiting), but, in this situation at least, the issue isn’t a made up one; it’s actually in everyone’s best interests. Do you have children, or siblings whose children are planning to have children? It seems grandchildren are the extent to which people give a damn about the future. Beyond people’s grandchildren, few people in positions of power in public policy seem to care about the long term impact of the policies they enact or promote (in government or corporations), and even fewer seem to be motivated to vote for long-term sustainability. It’s like most people are simply incapable of thinking about it. I would suggest education is at fault here, but I know better. It’s attitude and belief. Being confronted with actual hard data and facts just tends to make “belief-motivated” people solidify their positions.
    The complexity of the devices we use makes ‘right to repair’ not so clearly the best option for the environment. Consider cars as an example. Yes, a car built in the 60s was highly user serviceable. The quality of those cars almost made that an imperative. Here’s the thing about that. While it was easy for you or your local shade-tree mechanic to climb under the car or under the hood and change the oil or pull a water pump (I’ve done both) in order to effect comparatively inexpensive maintenance or repair, it’s also true that this resulted in vast quantities of oil, antifreeze and other toxic stuff to be dumped straight onto the ground or into the storm drain. (I never did that, but collecting the oil and taking it somewhere for recycling was a pain in the ass and a significant disincentive for most people to do the right thing.) It was cheap partly because there was no accountability. Those cars were built to lower tolerances than current vehicles and therefore met their end at 100,000 miles or less, and ended up as toxic junk.

    Modern cars have twice the lifespan or more, but are far less user serviceable. Computer controls, tighter tolerance specs, and more tightly packed engine compartments make for longer life, better mileage, and greater reliability, but they also make home repair and shade-tree work largely a thing of the past. On balance, I think this is a vast improvement from an environmental perspective. Cars last longer, need fewer (but more expensive) repairs, and work done at dealers and certified shops is more expensive, but results in more responsible containment, recycling and disposal of toxic automotive wastes. 

    Why am I writing about cars? Because the same principles are at play with iPhones. Before their introduction, cell phones and PDAs came with user-replaceable batteries. Sure, that’s less expensive, but those batteries were often cheap, third-party replacements, and consumers would buy several and most assuredly not dispose of them carefully and in an environmentally sound manner. Likewise, the devices themselves had a shorter shelf life than iPhones, and weren’t particularly repairable. This was o.k., because they were cheaper and easy enough to dump in the trash when replacing them. 

    I don’t believe Apple’s recycling robots are just for PR. They appear very serious about deploying them widely to implement a disassembly and recycling regimen that will result in significantly higher recovery of usable materials than the traditional shred-and-sort-by-hand operations, and therefore be of great environmental benefit. Their phones also are more reliable than the competition and have a longer lifespan. Android refers consumers to recycling centers that undoubtedly are part of the process of shredding and shipping electronic waste to deplorable operations overseas. Non-certified electronics repair shops also use cheap aftermaket parts that can crap out and reduce the ultimate lifespan of devices, and chances are also good those shops are not being particularly careful with waste disposal, either.

    So I don’t think a return to the halcyon days of third-party and consumer-serviced devices is necessarily such a great thing. I think the issue is clouded by the sort of nostalgia that only looks at the good side of the ledger. 
    A lot of great points raised in this post.
  • Reply 102 of 124
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    pyezuzu said:
    brucemc said:
    Scot1 said:
    This doesn’t surprise me. Marketplace (a “consumer watchdog” show also made by CBC also runs highly biased shows. 
    I disagree. CBC is generally the best non partisan news because it’s not reliant on any commercial interests. Marketplace has exposed many frauds and provided consumers with valuable information over the years to make informed decisions. 
    CBC and "non partisan" do not belong in the same sentence.
    I'm curious why you feel that way, because I haven't found CBC reporting to be either pro-left or pro-right. The manner in which government activity is reported hasn't changed much in the last few years, despite a change from a conservative government to liberal.
    You find CBC to be balanced?? Whoooo boy! SMH. The CBC skews way left, and their political coverage is about as even-handed as the NY Times, WaPo (or Fox) is. They are essentially the propaganda arm of the Liberal party, but unlike the left-wing outlets in the US the CBC forces taxpayers to foot the bill for their propaganda.
    You just took a crap out of your mouth there bud, lying 100% of the time like Trumpo seemingly huh.

    CBC is at most center-left (as defined in canada, which off course would be defined as communist in the US...) just like canadian society as a whole if you look at the last 50 years of elections. Even in the Harper years (which were right wing, but not extreme right), he barely got 40%. It reflects Canadian society, which is its role after all.

    BTW, only some dishonest skeve who wants to glaze crap all over the walls to cloud issues would would put Fox and WaPo in the same sentence and create a false equivalence out of it.


  • Reply 103 of 124
    darkpawdarkpaw Posts: 124member
    I recently had an 11-inch MacBook Air (Early-2014, I think) where the SSD had failed. The Apple Store said a replacement SSD plus labour would be £540. I bought a genuine Apple replacement SSD from eBay, and a £6 screwdriver kit, and swapped it out myself in about ten minutes. All done. Total price £131.

    I'm not saying Apple repairs are expensive, but there was very little point in paying more than the value of the computer to replace one small part of it. Maybe I am saying they're expensive...
  • Reply 104 of 124
    analogjackanalogjack Posts: 1,063member
    Wiens likens it to putting aftermarket tires on a Tesla, then Tesla shipping a software update that would stop the car from working with those specific tires. 

    Only a complete and utter imbecile would make a comparison between a Touch ID unit that is an electronic access into your life and bank, and a set a frikken tyres.
    Rayz2016radarthekat
  • Reply 105 of 124
    metrixmetrix Posts: 244member
    zklausz said:
    Today my toddler fell in the pool. I jumped in the rescue her and she was fine. (Thank god!). My two week old XS was in my pocket and was submerged in about a foot of water for less than five seconds. When I checked it, Face ID was disabled but the phone never shut off and was working fine besides Face ID (water proofing my butt). Took it to apple store they did diagnostic and a check of sim slot water indicator. Both were negative and everything appear normal. The really nice apple tech told me that if they take it back and open it up and find water damage it would cost me $550. This would have most likely been the case since Face ID broke after being in the pool. I asked him why apple advertises water proof and he couldn’t give me an answer.  Rather than take the risk I went back to Costco where I purchased it.  Told them the same story and they gave me a new phone on the spot.  Costco>Apple
    Yes I love how Costco lets people buy couches, tvs, vacuums and lets them bring them back after they have used them for a year or that big game or whatever. Do you see the stack of stuff people return after using them? What a waste! and stupid policy to let people take advantage. 
  • Reply 106 of 124
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,695member
    The last thing AI should be doing is defending Apple and their repair practices.   My experiences with Apples processes vary widely and I'm just one person. 

    Apples attitude with respect to repair parts on old equipment is also rather hypocritical when they try to pass themselves off as environmentally minded.   everytime Apple returns an item un-repaired for easily fixed problems they are adding to the waste stream.   If they don't want to be bothered with old hardware they should at the very least have a hands off policy with respect to those that are willing to repair that old hardware.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 107 of 124
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,695member
    Wow, all this CBC bashing, and for what?

    Are you guys saying ... "u don't believe you have the Right to Repair your own product?"

    That is what is Rossman and the CBC are fighting for? For us  ... the consumers.

    The right for YOU to REPAIR YOUR own product!

    Sure, if nothing goes wrong with your system, you are happy .. you are the 98%. You know the one's commenting here and "CBC bashing".

    But what about the 2%. You know the one's with a $1,100 bill to "REPAIR" their MacBook.

    How about we get comments from those people?
    Get them to tell us how they feel about their situation?
    What happens if you become one of those people?
    You might sing a "different tune"?

    Yeah, sure ... I am an iPhone and Mac user today. It was the iPod nano in 2006 that got me to switch to Apple. Before that though, for DECADES ... I hated Apple ... it was OVERPRICED and UNDERPOWERED compared to the competition. The facts are the facts.

    Now granted, Apple is doing lots of stuff right ... but these overpriced repairs and impossible "user" RAM AND SSD upgrades are starting to chaffe.


    What would these people think if the range in the kitchen couldn't be repaired by anybody but the builder?    More so that builder has a habit of telling you to go screw if the range is 5 years old or older.   On top of all of that the range builder institutes controls that prevents you or anybody else from repairing the unit.

    Apples position here is ignorant and flies in the face of the public image they put forth of being environmentally responsible.   A forked tongue devil.

    I might suggest also that Apples Mac line is again OVERPRICED and UNDERPOWERED.   Apples behavior with the Mac line up is beyond explanation.   Sadly we never hear of a shareholder putting time on the spot for this frustrating situation. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 108 of 124
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    wizard69 said:
    The last thing AI should be doing is defending Apple and their repair practices.   My experiences with Apples processes vary widely and I'm just one person. 

    Apples attitude with respect to repair parts on old equipment is also rather hypocritical when they try to pass themselves off as environmentally minded.   everytime Apple returns an item un-repaired for easily fixed problems they are adding to the waste stream.   If they don't want to be bothered with old hardware they should at the very least have a hands off policy with respect to those that are willing to repair that old hardware.
    I think maybe you should actually read the editorial. This isn't a black and white situation, and we will approve or disapprove of what Apple in part (such as this piece clearly does and elaborates as to why) as we see fit. Apple's repair policies are better than the alternative for the vast majority of its customers who demand instant repair and gratification -- if as we mentioned, perhaps not for AI readers.

    We address the fate of un-repaired items in the piece. Apple will take anything back for recycling and reclaim. If the user chucks it in the trash, then that is on them, not Apple.

    Regarding your oven metaphor? I don't keep a large amount of my personal data -- including financial info -- on my oven that relies on the lock functioning properly to keep secure.
    edited October 2018 magman1979radarthekat
  • Reply 109 of 124
    I get "edge cases" and all, but after having to have my wifes 6+ replaced 3 times and not a single one was ever opened up, I do think Apple is too quick to "here just buy another".  The last one was an out or warranty $300 bill to get another 6+.  

    Everyone knew it was probably just a loose antenna wire (it would work on WiFi but not LTE) but if I opened it myself I knew Apple would have issues so I took it to the Southlake store.  The guy looked at it, said "probably a little bent, shouldn't carry it in your pocket".  I informed him it is my wife's and she doesn't even usually wear pockets, it's a purse phone.  "Oh, well nothing we can do.  WOuld you like a new iphone 7?"  

    I realize all electronics are like that, easier to replace then repair but when it is out of warranty Apple needs to do a better job of at least taking it to the back to have a look at it.  
  • Reply 110 of 124
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 2,394member
    Anyone else think that bent pin was suspicious? How else would that have happened without someone opening the case and messing with it? Watch the video if you don’t know what I mean. It looked intentional to me. 

    That and the the home button replacement not mentioning anything about pairing the Secure Enclave and I couldn’t watch any more. More FUD and confirmation bias for the haters. 
    radarthekat
  • Reply 111 of 124
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 2,970moderator
    wizard69 said:
    The last thing AI should be doing is defending Apple and their repair practices.   My experiences with Apples processes vary widely and I'm just one person. 

    Apples attitude with respect to repair parts on old equipment is also rather hypocritical when they try to pass themselves off as environmentally minded.   everytime Apple returns an item un-repaired for easily fixed problems they are adding to the waste stream.   If they don't want to be bothered with old hardware they should at the very least have a hands off policy with respect to those that are willing to repair that old hardware.
    They have exactly a hands-off policy.  When has Apple ever stated that you cannot repair your own Apple products it bring it to anyone you like to repair for you?  Never. But a hands-off policy extends to Apple’s warranty too; if you ‘break the seal’ then don’t expect Apple to lay it’s hands upon it thereafter.  Regarding this, Apple will continue to support your device as long as you use Apple Authorized service centers.  Not sure why people have issue with this; seems pretty standard across industries.  
  • Reply 112 of 124
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 2,970moderator
    airnerd said:
    I get "edge cases" and all, but after having to have my wifes 6+ replaced 3 times and not a single one was ever opened up, I do think Apple is too quick to "here just buy another".  The last one was an out or warranty $300 bill to get another 6+.  

    Everyone knew it was probably just a loose antenna wire (it would work on WiFi but not LTE) but if I opened it myself I knew Apple would have issues so I took it to the Southlake store.  The guy looked at it, said "probably a little bent, shouldn't carry it in your pocket".  I informed him it is my wife's and she doesn't even usually wear pockets, it's a purse phone.  "Oh, well nothing we can do.  WOuld you like a new iphone 7?"  

    I realize all electronics are like that, easier to replace then repair but when it is out of warranty Apple needs to do a better job of at least taking it to the back to have a look at it.  
    They could have sent it off for repair for you, but that’s not what most people would want - to be without their phone for days/weeks.  Apple chose the level of in-store repair they did likely due to its scalability.  The company does sell some 300 million devices per year, with only just over 500 stores worldwide.  What would be your recommendation in that context after diving deep on those facts?  
  • Reply 113 of 124
    "And, it's probably an important point to remember that Apple's design and service choices make the devices fail less often"

    ...like the new keyboards requiring the mandatory touch bar display on macbook pros...?

    I just ordered a new 1TB sata III ssd upgrade for an SJ era mbp for ~$130US - hmmm...
    Including the new keyboard failures, the failure rate percent is half of what it was in 2001-2011, so yes. Overall, the 2016-2018 are more reliable than the vaunted 2015 was. And, that SSD you ordered is less than 1/6 the speed of the 2600 MB/sec one in the 2016-2018 MBP. Good price, though.
      $65           1TB HD          80MB/s
    $130  (2x)   1TB SSD      480MB/s (~6x)
    $800  (6x)   1TB AAPL  2600MB/s (~5.4x)
    ...as needs and budgets can differ, including over time,
    is it better for customers to have downstream choice...?

    edited October 2018 lorin schultz
  • Reply 114 of 124
    nhtnht Posts: 4,393member
    wizard69 said:
    Wow, all this CBC bashing, and for what?

    Are you guys saying ... "u don't believe you have the Right to Repair your own product?"

    That is what is Rossman and the CBC are fighting for? For us  ... the consumers.

    The right for YOU to REPAIR YOUR own product!

    Sure, if nothing goes wrong with your system, you are happy .. you are the 98%. You know the one's commenting here and "CBC bashing".

    But what about the 2%. You know the one's with a $1,100 bill to "REPAIR" their MacBook.

    How about we get comments from those people?
    Get them to tell us how they feel about their situation?
    What happens if you become one of those people?
    You might sing a "different tune"?

    Yeah, sure ... I am an iPhone and Mac user today. It was the iPod nano in 2006 that got me to switch to Apple. Before that though, for DECADES ... I hated Apple ... it was OVERPRICED and UNDERPOWERED compared to the competition. The facts are the facts.

    Now granted, Apple is doing lots of stuff right ... but these overpriced repairs and impossible "user" RAM AND SSD upgrades are starting to chaffe.


    What would these people think if the range in the kitchen couldn't be repaired by anybody but the builder?    More so that builder has a habit of telling you to go screw if the range is 5 years old or older.   On top of all of that the range builder institutes controls that prevents you or anybody else from repairing the unit.

    Apples position here is ignorant and flies in the face of the public image they put forth of being environmentally responsible.   A forked tongue devil.

    I might suggest also that Apples Mac line is again OVERPRICED and UNDERPOWERED.   Apples behavior with the Mac line up is beyond explanation.   Sadly we never hear of a shareholder putting time on the spot for this frustrating situation. 
    Buy a share and register to go to the shareholder meeting.  First come first served.
  • Reply 115 of 124
    radarthekat said:
    [...] Apple will continue to support your device as long as you use Apple Authorized service centers.  Not sure why people have issue with this; seems pretty standard across industries.  
    Would an "Authorized" service centre be allowed to replace a single broken key on a keyboard, or would they be required to perform some Apple-mandated procedure similar to what they would do at the Apple Store Genius Bar? @"Mike Wuerthele" do you know?
  • Reply 116 of 124
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    radarthekat said:
    [...] Apple will continue to support your device as long as you use Apple Authorized service centers.  Not sure why people have issue with this; seems pretty standard across industries.  
    Would an "Authorized" service centre be allowed to replace a single broken key on a keyboard, or would they be required to perform some Apple-mandated procedure similar to what they would do at the Apple Store Genius Bar? @"Mike Wuerthele" do you know?
    It depends on what’s wrong. 
  • Reply 117 of 124
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    "And, it's probably an important point to remember that Apple's design and service choices make the devices fail less often"

    ...like the new keyboards requiring the mandatory touch bar display on macbook pros...?

    I just ordered a new 1TB sata III ssd upgrade for an SJ era mbp for ~$130US - hmmm...
    Including the new keyboard failures, the failure rate percent is half of what it was in 2001-2011, so yes. Overall, the 2016-2018 are more reliable than the vaunted 2015 was. And, that SSD you ordered is less than 1/6 the speed of the 2600 MB/sec one in the 2016-2018 MBP. Good price, though.
      $65           1TB HD          80MB/s
    $130  (2x)   1TB SSD      480MB/s (~6x)
    $800  (6x)   1TB AAPL  2600MB/s (~5.4x)
    ...as needs and budgets can differ, including over time,
    is it better for customers to have downstream choice...?

    I'm not certain what your point is. Where would this $130 1TB 7mm SATA SSD go in your scenario? Apple hasn't had a standard SATA port internal to the MacBook Pro since 2012. Keep in mind in this pic that there are feet under the MBP, and the case thickness is not zero.

    You and I may care. 20x our number, conservatively, do not -- and would rather have same-day turnaround done by somebody else.




    edited October 2018 fastasleep
  • Reply 118 of 124
    radarthekat said:
    [...] Apple will continue to support your device as long as you use Apple Authorized service centers.  Not sure why people have issue with this; seems pretty standard across industries.  
    Would an "Authorized" service centre be allowed to replace a single broken key on a keyboard, or would they be required to perform some Apple-mandated procedure similar to what they would do at the Apple Store Genius Bar? @"Mike Wuerthele" do you know?
    It depends on what’s wrong. 
    So then to respond to @radarthekat's wondering why people would have a problem with Apple authorized service being the only option, it would be because "authorized" service may be overkill, and thus prohibitively expensive. Some repairs, especially to older equipment, don't require bringing the device up to "good as new" condition. They just need to be made "good enough" to keep working.

    If the cost of the repair is more than the device is worth, machines that could see continued use instead wind up being waste material.

    I have two old MacBook Pros in a cupboard. One has a bad keyboard and screen but the "guts" are fine. The other one has a good screen and keyboard but there's something wrong with the internals. Will an Apple Authorized depot consolidate the two into one working machine, or will they be obligated to observe some Apple-mandated protocol that prohibits that? At the moment I can take them to an "unauthorized" service depot, but I won't be able to do that when the Macs I'm using now get old, because the Mom & Pop shop won't have access to the software required to reanimate the Frankenstein. That's what the fuss is about.
  • Reply 119 of 124
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    radarthekat said:
    [...] Apple will continue to support your device as long as you use Apple Authorized service centers.  Not sure why people have issue with this; seems pretty standard across industries.  
    Would an "Authorized" service centre be allowed to replace a single broken key on a keyboard, or would they be required to perform some Apple-mandated procedure similar to what they would do at the Apple Store Genius Bar? @"Mike Wuerthele" do you know?
    It depends on what’s wrong. 
    So then to respond to @radarthekat's wondering why people would have a problem with Apple authorized service being the only option, it would be because "authorized" service may be overkill, and thus prohibitively expensive. Some repairs, especially to older equipment, don't require bringing the device up to "good as new" condition. They just need to be made "good enough" to keep working.

    If the cost of the repair is more than the device is worth, machines that could see continued use instead wind up being waste material.

    I have two old MacBook Pros in a cupboard. One has a bad keyboard and screen but the "guts" are fine. The other one has a good screen and keyboard but there's something wrong with the internals. Will an Apple Authorized depot consolidate the two into one working machine, or will they be obligated to observe some Apple-mandated protocol that prohibits that? At the moment I can take them to an "unauthorized" service depot, but I won't be able to do that when the Macs I'm using now get old, because the Mom & Pop shop won't have access to the software required to reanimate the Frankenstein. That's what the fuss is about.
    A lot of this depends on the shop. In the authorized shops I've worked in, we'd have made you sign a "fuck if we know if this is going to work, but you're going to pay for labor anyway" waiver, and we'd do it. Based on what iFixit said about the T2, this seems to be at least still doable now.
    edited October 2018
  • Reply 120 of 124
    radarthekat said:
    [...] Apple will continue to support your device as long as you use Apple Authorized service centers.  Not sure why people have issue with this; seems pretty standard across industries.  
    Would an "Authorized" service centre be allowed to replace a single broken key on a keyboard, or would they be required to perform some Apple-mandated procedure similar to what they would do at the Apple Store Genius Bar? @"Mike Wuerthele" do you know?
    It depends on what’s wrong. 
    So then to respond to @radarthekat's wondering why people would have a problem with Apple authorized service being the only option, it would be because "authorized" service may be overkill, and thus prohibitively expensive. Some repairs, especially to older equipment, don't require bringing the device up to "good as new" condition. They just need to be made "good enough" to keep working.

    If the cost of the repair is more than the device is worth, machines that could see continued use instead wind up being waste material.

    I have two old MacBook Pros in a cupboard. One has a bad keyboard and screen but the "guts" are fine. The other one has a good screen and keyboard but there's something wrong with the internals. Will an Apple Authorized depot consolidate the two into one working machine, or will they be obligated to observe some Apple-mandated protocol that prohibits that? At the moment I can take them to an "unauthorized" service depot, but I won't be able to do that when the Macs I'm using now get old, because the Mom & Pop shop won't have access to the software required to reanimate the Frankenstein. That's what the fuss is about.
    A lot of this depends on the shop. In the authorized shops I've worked in, we'd have made you sign a "fuck if we know if this is going to work, but you're going to pay for labor anyway" waiver, and we'd do it. Based on what iFixit said about the T2, this seems to be at least still doable now.
    Thanks Mike!
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