How to upgrade the RAM on the new 2018 Mac mini

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  • Reply 61 of 159
    melgross said:
    wreighven said:
    Melgross that is incorrect. Read the article. It explicitly states this process does NOT void the warranty. Only if you break something do you have a problem...

    Your last sentence (question) is a good one though. Seeing how involved this is, I'd consider just biting the bullet and getting "more" RAM at time of purchase.
    What did I say? “If you screw up”. Read more carefully.
    Yes, I thought you were very clear -- but then got hammered by multiple people for not saying what you very clearly did say.

    Hope you are well!
  • Reply 62 of 159
    jdb8167 said:
    If I were to buy a new mini I would go with the 16 GB with the knowledge that I could update in the future if needed. I did this with my Mac Pro. I bought it with 16 GB of RAM with the idea that I could update it later if needed. (The upgrade for the Mac Pro is significantly easier than this.) It turns out that it was never needed. 16 GB has been adequate for nearly 5 years of use.

    I applaud Apple for making an upgrade possible. I don’t believe they should have compromised their design in any way to make it easy. For most people, the purchased RAM will be fine for the life of the computer. 
    There is design for visual appeal.
    And there is design for functional use.

    The limitations here are for visual appeal -- which many serious geeks would willingly sacrifice for added functionality.   In this case specifically, it seems Apple could have easily flipped the memory over to the back side of the board and then simply put a door in the frame to get to it as countless laptops have done for decades.   But, that would interfere with the visual design.

    It is a matter of opinion if Apple is getting too far away from the "form follows function" philosophy -- or possibly even reversing it!
  • Reply 63 of 159
    anomeanome Posts: 1,153member
    auxio said:
    Exactly.  I'm sure those who know how to do their own car repairs/upgrades complain about the specialized tools and difficulty these days compared the days where you could store extra luggage under the hood of cars there was so much space.  For the rest of us, it's much nicer to drive smaller cars which are far more efficient, less noisy, etc.
    Exactly where are these smaller, more efficient cars? Everywhere I look, the roads are filled with massive, gas guzzling SUVs.

    Everywhere except in the US, I believe. Even here we have a lot of SUVs that never do anything useful or sporty, but we do have a lot of smaller cars as well.

    What I'm finding interesting about the discussion is that the people who want to "tinker" and install their own RAM are complaining about the amount of tinkering needed. It's possible, it just isn't recommended for people who aren't comfortable removing the motherboard in order to save money on the memory upgrade.

    fastasleep
  • Reply 64 of 159
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,173member
    melgross said:

    melgross said:
    Since Apple isn’t advocating doing this, it voids the warrantee if you screw up. Don’t forget that. Is it worth it for cheaper RAM?
    It does not explicitly void the warranty.

    Also as the forum software doesn't always catch all of the main site's images, if you're following along, you're best off doing so with the video or from the main page.
    If something goes wrong, and the computer stops working, I can pretty much guarantee, they will charge for the repair. They could also take your new RAM, and charge for the RAM they put in. This has happened before. Usually people will deinstalled the RAM they bought, and reinstall the RAM that came with the machine before bringing the computer to Apple. But if it doesnt work with the original RAM, they will know you screwed up, and charge for the repair. That’s been policy going back forever. If you’re really lucky, you may get someone in the store to be k8nd. But don’t bet on it. Apple isn’t marketing this machine as being do it yourself RAM or drive upgradable.
    From Apple's October keynote: "Not only is this memory faster, but it's also in SO-DIMMs, something we know our Mac Mini customers will really appreciate." 

    What part about that says Apple isn't marketing this machine as supporting user-upgradeable RAM?
    Apple obviously gave that feature to customers because they appreciate user-upgradeable RAM.
    It doesn’t say anything of the sort. customers could replace any type of dmm just as easily. SO dimms are smaller, and use less power, allowing them to run cooler. That’s about it.
    edited November 8 randominternetpersonrandominternetperson
  • Reply 65 of 159
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,289member

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    Define "average" user?  Most "average" users I wouldn't trust to get anywhere near the insides of a computer.  This is risky only for those that have zero business being around electronics.

    I said it before, obviously I need to say it again.  Most people will NEVER, EVER open their computers post-purchase to upgrade ANYTHING.  Now, for that < 1% of people that do, most will upgrade ONCE and never crack it open again... 

    Unless you're like me that has to open it up once in a blue moon to blow the dust out.  That's it.  Stop making it sound like a bigger problem than it really is.  If you can handle a screwdriver, have steady hands, know what static electricity can do, and most of all, have PATIENCE, this upgrade really is a no-brainer.

    I wouldn't do it to upgrade to 16GB... price differential is too small.  But for 32GB?  Yes, I absolutely would.  I've cracked-open enough iMacs in my past to feel pretty comfortable to open up a Mac mini.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 66 of 159
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,173member
    melgross said:
    wreighven said:
    Melgross that is incorrect. Read the article. It explicitly states this process does NOT void the warranty. Only if you break something do you have a problem...

    Your last sentence (question) is a good one though. Seeing how involved this is, I'd consider just biting the bullet and getting "more" RAM at time of purchase.
    What did I say? “If you screw up”. Read more carefully.
    Yes, I thought you were very clear -- but then got hammered by multiple people for not saying what you very clearly did say.

    Hope you are well!
    Thanks.

    People are mistaking what I’m saying in a number of ways. I’m not saying they shouldn’t do this - period. I’m saying that some people, such as myself, have a lot of experience with things like this. For the average person, it can be more difficult than they think. They also need the right screwdriver, which most people won’t have, and won’t think of getting.

    a lot of companies, including Apple, will repair something you broke, but not under warranty. People here don’t want to think Apple will do that.
    edited November 8 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 67 of 159
    There are no options right now for 64GB (dual 32GB) sticks outside of Apple. The nearest one coming soon will run over $1100 w/ tax, so really, if you're going to do it right, just buy it from Apple with coverage and call it an amortized cost over the 5 years of its expected service.
    edited November 8
  • Reply 68 of 159
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,173member
    This is Apple’s page on upgrading memory n various Mac mini’s. Note what it says about the new, 2018 model.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205041#one

    You can see that in older models where memory can be upgraded, they show you how to do it. Not here. They very explicitly say to go to Apple.
    edited November 8 taddrandominternetpersonGeorgeBMacphilboogie
  • Reply 69 of 159
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,732member
    GeorgeBMac said:
    The limitations here are for visual appeal -- which many serious geeks would willingly sacrifice for added functionality.   In this case specifically, it seems Apple could have easily flipped the memory over to the back side of the board and then simply put a door in the frame to get to it as countless laptops have done for decades.   But, that would interfere with the visual design.
    I need to watch the video to get a better feel for it, I suppose... but one thing that is puzzling me is why the exhaust is at the bottom rather than the top. Wouldn't reversing that put the RAM at the bottom where it would be more accessible, plus help with moving the heat the way it wants to go? I can understand them not wanting to saw a door in the top of the unit, but as you say, the serious geeks wouldn't mind.

    anome said:
    Everywhere except in the US, I believe. Even here we have a lot of SUVs that never do anything useful or sporty, but we do have a lot of smaller cars as well.

    What I'm finding interesting about the discussion is that the people who want to "tinker" and install their own RAM are complaining about the amount of tinkering needed. It's possible, it just isn't recommended for people who aren't comfortable removing the motherboard in order to save money on the memory upgrade.

    re: SUVs, I think it's often more of a user preference for being bigger or higher-up (to the annoyance of everyone else). Or, unfortunately, it has become an 'image/fashion' thing for some stupid reason. Best case, it is actually practical... as you say where they need to haul something (i.e.: need the extra space), or use them off-road for the few models that are actual capable of such things.

    re: tinkering - I think there is a 3rd category which may have just been forgotten. Back in the older days of Macs, most people bought them with the base RAM, and then upgraded them or had a friend do it. It wasn't all that tinker-y or unusual. Now, it is unusual, but wasn't back then.

    I'm not sure which drove which though... whether more modern designs lead to less people tinkering, or whether the culture just doesn't tinker anymore. I'd say more of the latter, but it's some combination.

    sflocal said:
    ... Most people will NEVER, EVER open their computers post-purchase to upgrade ANYTHING.  Now, for that < 1% of people that do, most will upgrade ONCE and never crack it open again... 
    While true, as I said above, is this the tail wagging the dog? When Macs could upgrade the RAM by just opening a cover, the majority of people upgraded the RAM, not < 1%. They might not have done it themselves, but a lot of people had someone like me do it for them. It was kind of standard upgrade practice. Computer feeling slow? How much RAM do you have? Oh, we'll order a couple sticks and put them in.

    There are no options right now for 64GB (dual 32GB) sticks outside of Apple. The nearest one coming soon will run over $1100 w/ tax, so really, if you're going to do it right, just buy it from Apple with coverage and call it an amortized cost over the 5 years of its expected service.
    https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/2666DDR4S64P/
    GeorgeBMacbloggerblog
  • Reply 70 of 159
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,610member
    wreighven said:
    Melgross that is incorrect. Read the article. It explicitly states this process does NOT void the warranty. Only if you break something do you have a problem...

    Your last sentence (question) is a good one though. Seeing how involved this is, I'd consider just biting the bullet and getting "more" RAM at time of purchase.
    melgross said:
    Since Apple isn’t advocating doing this, it voids the warrantee if you screw up. Don’t forget that. Is it worth it for cheaper RAM?

    It only voids the warranty if you break something in the process of swapping out the RAM which is no different from any other Mac with something that was user serviceable with any part. 
    cgWerks
  • Reply 71 of 159
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,610member

    Remember when Apple used to be user-friendly? Flip the entire motherboard on a Powermac out into the open with just the flip of a latch. Likewise pull out all the guts in a G4 Cube with the pull of a handle. RAM slots quickly accessible in a Powerbook just by pulling the battery, no tools at all required. Ah, the good, old days. What's wrong with doing that again, Jonny Ive? Are looks the only things that matter now, with no regard for function?
    OMG...first its Apple doesn't make it user serviceable. Now its....its not easy enough! When does this shit stop? When are you people ever gonna be happy? They could have just soldered in the RAM and said the hell with it, but they didn't. You people are unbelievable! 

    Also, once again, 99.9% of the customers buying this will NEVER actually do this. Or, if you do, how many times are you gonna end up doing it? My guess is once and only once. Most however will just buy what they need and be done with it. 
    fastasleep
  • Reply 72 of 159
    auxio said:
    [...] Turned out that the RAM I bought didn't have error correction/ECC and the heat sinks on it were much smaller, one of which was the cause of my crashes.  This was the reason that the RAM Apple used was a lot more expensive.  The devil is in the details.
    Good point.

    Of course the comparisons in this thread ARE for identical RAM. Apple is charging almost twice as much as Crucial et al for exactly the same component.
  • Reply 73 of 159
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,407member
    wdowell said:
    All those different screws etc. I think id get them muddled up etc. It's a great video though. perhaps watching this at the same time and putting each series of screws clearly on a mat with labels may help!
    Easiest way I've found to keep things straight is to follow the numbered steps at ifixit.com and put screws in order of each step into successive bins of a cupcake holder. Then reverse the steps, restoring screws and small parts from the bins in reverse order. If you need to move, the cupcake holder is easy to transport. You might also be able to secure parts in the bins longer term with saran wrap.
    If you put screws and small parts on a table or mat, you risk mixing them up if you bump the table.
    edited November 8
  • Reply 74 of 159
    cgWerks said:
    I'm not sure which drove which though... whether more modern designs lead to less people tinkering, or whether the culture just doesn't tinker anymore.
    I got an email from a friend saying he'd heard about me buying a new mixer. He asked me to let him know when I'd finished pulling it apart and was ready to see what it sounded like!
  • Reply 75 of 159

    macxpress said:
    Also, once again, 99.9% of the customers buying this will NEVER actually do this. Or, if you do, how many times are you gonna end up doing it? My guess is once and only once. Most however will just buy what they need and be done with it. 
    I would MUCH rather just have Apple install all the RAM I'll ever need. I don't see much benefit to starting with less and adding more later. The only problem is Apple snapping on a rubber glove and telling me to bend over when I order upgrades from them. For those of us who want 32 GB, the hit is substantial. If Apple set the upgrade price anywhere even close to reasonable there would be less need for users to climb inside.
  • Reply 76 of 159
    thrangthrang Posts: 743member
    This is not that difficult... thanks for the article.
  • Reply 77 of 159
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,732member
    lorin schultz said:
    I would MUCH rather just have Apple install all the RAM I'll ever need. I don't see much benefit to starting with less and adding more later. The only problem is Apple snapping on a rubber glove and telling me to bend over when I order upgrades from them. For those of us who want 32 GB, the hit is substantial. If Apple set the upgrade price anywhere even close to reasonable there would be less need for users to climb inside.
    I think most people won't ever use this 'feature' and those who are comfortable with tinkering might just do it from the start (i.e.: order base and do their own upgrade). But, what I see as the main benefit from this (for the average buyer), is that they could order it with, 8 or 16 GB now, and then in a couple of years upgrade it when prices come down or if their needs have changed.

    I don't think this is aimed at allowing people to save some money by buying their own RAM from a 3rd party, though I do with Apple didn't push the up-sell profits quite as hard. If they priced things more reasonably, it sure would head off a lot of complaining. It is one thing to offer a premium product at premium prices, but people do get testy when you sell the same thing they can get elsewhere for way more. Apple kind of invites this kind of complaint.
  • Reply 78 of 159
    cgWerks said:

    Their RAM might be as good or better, and they have an exceptional warranty and service. But, IMO, it just isn't worth it at this point. Also, as I noted above, keep in mind that a year or two from now, those 32 GB and 64 GB prices will probably drop. THAT would be the time to do it unless you absolutely need it right now.

    Apple's memory tends to be just rebranded memory available retail through other chains.  When I upgraded my 2009 Mac Minis Apple was basically just using Micron/Crucial memory - so to stay using the same brand I just ordered my upgrades from Crucial.  This time I would have to order some brand through NewEgg since they seem to have rather cheap shipping (it is actually cheaper for me to order small components from NewEgg even though they tend to be manufactured a stones throw away here in Asia).  
  • Reply 79 of 159
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,343member

    macxpress said:
    Also, once again, 99.9% of the customers buying this will NEVER actually do this. Or, if you do, how many times are you gonna end up doing it? My guess is once and only once. Most however will just buy what they need and be done with it. 
    I would MUCH rather just have Apple install all the RAM I'll ever need. I don't see much benefit to starting with less and adding more later. The only problem is Apple snapping on a rubber glove and telling me to bend over when I order upgrades from them. For those of us who want 32 GB, the hit is substantial. If Apple set the upgrade price anywhere even close to reasonable there would be less need for users to climb inside.
    “I want Apple to give me exactly what I want and I want to set the price for getting exactly what I want.”

    As I’ve said before, this is exactly what every single complaint about Apple boils down to. 
    fastasleepmacxpress
  • Reply 80 of 159
    Does anyone know if the ram sticks need to be of the same capacity each? Or can I have one slot with 8GB and the other with 16GB?

    Also, has anyone ordered the 8GB configuration? Was it a pair of 4GB modules or a single 8GB stick leaving the other slot free?
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