How to upgrade the RAM on the new 2018 Mac mini

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  • Reply 81 of 159
    Rayz2016 said:

    macxpress said:
    Also, once again, 99.9% of the customers buying this will NEVER actually do this. Or, if you do, how many times are you gonna end up doing it? My guess is once and only once. Most however will just buy what they need and be done with it. 
    I would MUCH rather just have Apple install all the RAM I'll ever need. I don't see much benefit to starting with less and adding more later. The only problem is Apple snapping on a rubber glove and telling me to bend over when I order upgrades from them. For those of us who want 32 GB, the hit is substantial. If Apple set the upgrade price anywhere even close to reasonable there would be less need for users to climb inside.
    “I want Apple to give me exactly what I want and I want to set the price for getting exactly what I want.”

    As I’ve said before, this is exactly what every single complaint about Apple boils down to. 
    Oh come on, this is hardly an example of that.

    I grant you that Apple has pissed me off enough with this that i've been shouting from the rooftops about it (see "Old man yells at cloud") and it's probably getting repetitive so I'll back off now, but my complaint is not a case of me just wanting things my way. There is no sane argument to defend Apple's prices for upgrades, and the short-term gain must surely be offset by the longer-term costs associated with alienating buyers.

    I accept that Apple's prices will be higher. That's not my complaint. It's how MUCH higher. Double to triple that of any other supplier is too much. I also understand those who will say the response available to me is to not buy what I consider overpriced. That's fair and I'm doing that, but I'm hoping that if there's enough backlash we can persuade Apple to consider a course adjustment on upgrade pricing, similar to how bitching about Final Cut Pro X, the Mac Pro, and the Mac mini actually brought about positive change.
    GeorgeBMaccgWerks
  • Reply 82 of 159
    Why would I upgrade the RAM on the new mac mini?  It's new.  Follow up question would be why does Apple sell a device that needs a RAM upgrade?
  • Reply 83 of 159
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,735member
    rob53 said:
    Just checked MacSales/OWC and their RAM for this model costs $169.99 vs the $200 upgrade price Apple charges ($188 if you qualify for their EPP and (possibly) educational discounts). I use MacSales all the time but regardless of the warranty, the price difference doesn't make sense to me considering the lack of ease in replacing it. Using cheaper RAM is not something I do or recommend so for those who just have to be able to change or upgrade RAM, good luck.

    disclaimer: OWC charges $1079.99 for a full 64GB of RAM vs Apple's $1316 (EPP price) so it might be worth it if you really want to spend that much money on a Mac mini.

    from https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205041 Couldn't quickly find actual warranty but when Apple says something like this, it sounds to me like they aren't allowing it.

    Applicable models

    • Mac mini (2018)

    To upgrade the memory in your Mac mini (2018), go to an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider.

    We asked. We're also very clear in our warning about the procedure.
    The fact you have to put back Apple's RAM if you need to go in for a repair should ring alarm bells here!  That's also called deception in my book.  What is the 'guidance' here on what to say if the Apple tech asks if you have replaced the RAM and put the Apple RAM back ...  lie?

    I always have upgraded my RAM (and internal storage) on any Mac I own (I keep them all a long time)  where it is feasible even if difficult.  However, never until my extended warranty is out.  In my case, I make sure I purchase a Mac with the correct configuration for my needs for the two years under coverage.  If you figure out what it costs to take out Apple's RAM and replace within those two years you have to add the two sets of RAM together to get the true cost unless you can get a trade in.  I don't see how that can ever make mathematical sense otherwise.  Two or three years later the cost of RAM has usually fallen enough to make that upgrade cost effective but even then you have to do the math.  For my 2013 Mac Pro, it was nearly four years before that RAM was worth the cost and only then thanks to a trade in.  It obviously varies but Apple never use cheap RAM so the calculations have to take that into account.  On several Mac Mini 2012 models I have, it was a no-brainer to upgrade RAM and HDD to SSD at four years old, same with a 2010 MBP i7 15".  

    So the bottom line is this is a great article to file away for reference in two to three years.
    edited November 9 randominternetperson
  • Reply 84 of 159

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    The average user is NOT messing with this stuff...
    auxio
  • Reply 85 of 159
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    auxio said:
    Exactly.  I'm sure those who know how to do their own car repairs/upgrades complain about the specialized tools and difficulty these days compared the days where you could store extra luggage under the hood of cars there was so much space.  For the rest of us, it's much nicer to drive smaller cars which are far more efficient, less noisy, etc.
    Exactly where are these smaller, more efficient cars? Everywhere I look, the roads are filled with massive, gas guzzling SUVs.
    Check Europe where cities were designed before cars were invented (i.e. there just isn't space for big cars), and gas prices are much higher.  Not everyone in the world lives the North American suburban dream of big big big.  And that dream is already failing as the average person goes deeper and deeper into debt to finance it.
    edited November 9 macplusplus
  • Reply 86 of 159
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    auxio said:
    [...] Turned out that the RAM I bought didn't have error correction/ECC and the heat sinks on it were much smaller, one of which was the cause of my crashes.  This was the reason that the RAM Apple used was a lot more expensive.  The devil is in the details.
    Good point.

    Of course the comparisons in this thread ARE for identical RAM. Apple is charging almost twice as much as Crucial et al for exactly the same component.
    And so you're either paying for the extra assembly line needed to build the machine, or you're paying for a service technician's time to install it.  You do understand that, when you get someone else to do something for you, it's always going to cost a fair bit more than if you do it yourself right?  People don't seem to have a problem paying extra for home renos/repairs, car repairs, etc.  But they'll scream from the rooftops if it's for their computer.
    randominternetpersonmacplusplus
  • Reply 87 of 159
    Why would I upgrade the RAM on the new mac mini?  It's new.  Follow up question would be why does Apple sell a device that needs a RAM upgrade?
    It's for people who can't afford max out all the RAM now but want to upgrade later. More RAM helps open 10+ applications at the same time without slowing down Mac. Especially Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects and Premiere are RAM hungry. 
  • Reply 88 of 159

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    The average user is NOT messing with this stuff...
    Dunno why people are backing Apple on this one, it's a lazy implementation of a premium product and a crappy user experience. They managed to block more tinkerers from attempting to upgrade their own RAM. Fewer people will buy it and Apple will end-up discontinuing it.
  • Reply 89 of 159
    bryanus said:
    Does anyone know if the ram sticks need to be of the same capacity each? Or can I have one slot with 8GB and the other with 16GB?

    Also, has anyone ordered the 8GB configuration? Was it a pair of 4GB modules or a single 8GB stick leaving the other slot free?
    Based on past history with every other Mac mini, I'm nearly certain that the answers are "For best performance, don't mix sizes of memory modules. Install two identical memory modules" and "pair of 4GB."  Having said that, I wonder what the performance hit is if they don't match.
  • Reply 90 of 159
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,589administrator
    bryanus said:
    Does anyone know if the ram sticks need to be of the same capacity each? Or can I have one slot with 8GB and the other with 16GB?

    Also, has anyone ordered the 8GB configuration? Was it a pair of 4GB modules or a single 8GB stick leaving the other slot free?
    Based on past history with every other Mac mini, I'm nearly certain that the answers are "For best performance, don't mix sizes of memory modules. Install two identical memory modules" and "pair of 4GB."  Having said that, I wonder what the performance hit is if they don't match.
    In the past, it can be up to 20 percent on big time memory bandwidth intensive tasks. Apple sells them as matched pairs, and that's what we're recommending as well.
    edited November 9 cgWerks
  • Reply 91 of 159
    bryanus said:
    Does anyone know if the ram sticks need to be of the same capacity each? Or can I have one slot with 8GB and the other with 16GB?

    Also, has anyone ordered the 8GB configuration? Was it a pair of 4GB modules or a single 8GB stick leaving the other slot free?
    Based on past history with every other Mac mini, I'm nearly certain that the answers are "For best performance, don't mix sizes of memory modules. Install two identical memory modules" and "pair of 4GB."  Having said that, I wonder what the performance hit is if they don't match.
    In the past, it can be up to 20 percent on big time memory bandwidth intensive tasks. Apple sells them as matched pairs, and that's what we're recommending as well.
    Interesting. I wasn't aware of the performance hit.

    I have mixed modules in an older 2011 mini, but it just does home theater duties so I can't comment on performance issues. I guess I was wondering if I could get the base 8GB config (likely dual rgb modules), then purchase a single 16GB module to upgrade the total memory to 20GB. That would be plenty for my needs now (currently running 16GB in `12 server). And if Apple somehow used a single 8GB module instead of dual 4GB sticks, that would be a bonus. But it seems like it needs dual sticks to run. Would be nice to have an official answer on this and the performance hit if mixing modules capacities.
  • Reply 92 of 159
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,735member
    bryanus said:
    bryanus said:
    Does anyone know if the ram sticks need to be of the same capacity each? Or can I have one slot with 8GB and the other with 16GB?

    Also, has anyone ordered the 8GB configuration? Was it a pair of 4GB modules or a single 8GB stick leaving the other slot free?
    Based on past history with every other Mac mini, I'm nearly certain that the answers are "For best performance, don't mix sizes of memory modules. Install two identical memory modules" and "pair of 4GB."  Having said that, I wonder what the performance hit is if they don't match.
    In the past, it can be up to 20 percent on big time memory bandwidth intensive tasks. Apple sells them as matched pairs, and that's what we're recommending as well.
    Interesting. I wasn't aware of the performance hit.

    I have mixed modules in an older 2011 mini, but it just does home theater duties so I can't comment on performance issues. I guess I was wondering if I could get the base 8GB config (likely dual rgb modules), then purchase a single 16GB module to upgrade the total memory to 20GB. That would be plenty for my needs now (currently running 16GB in `12 server). And if Apple somehow used a single 8GB module instead of dual 4GB sticks, that would be a bonus. But it seems like it needs dual sticks to run. Would be nice to have an official answer on this and the performance hit if mixing modules capacities.
    https://everymac.com/actual-maximum-mac-ram/actual-maximum-mac-mini-ram-capacity.html
  • Reply 93 of 159
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,420member

    Also as the forum software doesn't always catch all of the main site's images, if you're following along, you're best off doing so with the video or from the main page.
    Is the forum software ever going to be fixed over this? Because I don't like the homepage; too many ads. I prefer to simply enter the date, like so:
    https://appleinsider.com/archives/18/11/08/

    and read whatever article I like from there.
  • Reply 94 of 159
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    The average user is NOT messing with this stuff...
    Dunno why people are backing Apple on this one, it's a lazy implementation of a premium product and a crappy user experience. They managed to block more tinkerers from attempting to upgrade their own RAM. Fewer people will buy it and Apple will end-up discontinuing it.
    Look, I'm someone who has done very difficult tinkering with computers in the past.  For example, to get more performance out of an old G4 TiBook, I moved one of the resistors on the motherboard which controlled the CPU speed (the hardware equivalent of BIOS overclocking on PCs).

    However, I also am open minded enough to see that I'm in a very small group of people who knows how to do this, cares about it, and/or is willing to spend my time doing it.  And I also understand that it requires extra product design, engineering, and assembly line complexity to include a RAM access panel or similarly easy access.  If this was an Arduino or Raspberry Pi type of device targeted at tinkerers, then I'd definitely question the decision.  But because it's a device targeted at the mass market, I completely understand why it was made.
    edited November 9 macplusplusfastasleepcgWerks
  • Reply 95 of 159
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,735member
    auxio said:

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    The average user is NOT messing with this stuff...
    Dunno why people are backing Apple on this one, it's a lazy implementation of a premium product and a crappy user experience. They managed to block more tinkerers from attempting to upgrade their own RAM. Fewer people will buy it and Apple will end-up discontinuing it.
    Look, I'm someone who has done very difficult tinkering with computers in the past.  For example, to get more performance out of an old G4 TiBook, I moved one of the resistors on the motherboard which controlled the CPU speed (the hardware equivalent of BIOS overclocking on PCs).

    However, I also am open minded enough to see that I'm in a very small group of people who knows how to do this, cares about it, and/or is willing to spend my time doing it.  And I also understand that it requires extra product design, engineering, and assembly line complexity to include a RAM access panel or similarly easy access.  If this was an Arduino or Raspberry Pi type of device targeted at tinkerers, then I'd definitely question the decision.  But because it's a device targeted at the mass market, I completely understand why it was made.
    100% agree,
    macplusplus
  • Reply 96 of 159
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,735member

    Also as the forum software doesn't always catch all of the main site's images, if you're following along, you're best off doing so with the video or from the main page.
    Is the forum software ever going to be fixed over this? Because I don't like the homepage; too many ads. I prefer to simply enter the date, like so:
    https://appleinsider.com/archives/18/11/08/

    and read whatever article I like from there.
    Hi Phil, just posted on our Slack board's General section a note referencing you :)
    edited November 9 philboogie
  • Reply 97 of 159
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,901member
    bryanus said:
    Does anyone know if the ram sticks need to be of the same capacity each? Or can I have one slot with 8GB and the other with 16GB?

    Also, has anyone ordered the 8GB configuration? Was it a pair of 4GB modules or a single 8GB stick leaving the other slot free?
    Based on past history with every other Mac mini, I'm nearly certain that the answers are "For best performance, don't mix sizes of memory modules. Install two identical memory modules" and "pair of 4GB."  Having said that, I wonder what the performance hit is if they don't match.
    Having matched pairs enables dual-channel memory.  Which, in theory, doubles the amount of memory which the CPU can access at the same time, and thus should make your computer faster for memory-intensive tasks.  In practice however, the benefit you get really depends on what you're doing with your computer.

    Here's a good real-world test of a few different tasks and the benefit of dual vs single channel memory:

    https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/1349-ram-how-dual-channel-works-vs-single-channel/Page-3

  • Reply 98 of 159
    auxio said:

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    The average user is NOT messing with this stuff...
    Dunno why people are backing Apple on this one, it's a lazy implementation of a premium product and a crappy user experience. They managed to block more tinkerers from attempting to upgrade their own RAM. Fewer people will buy it and Apple will end-up discontinuing it.
    Look, I'm someone who has done very difficult tinkering with computers in the past.  For example, to get more performance out of an old G4 TiBook, I moved one of the resistors on the motherboard which controlled the CPU speed (the hardware equivalent of BIOS overclocking on PCs).

    However, I also am open minded enough to see that I'm in a very small group of people who knows how to do this, cares about it, and/or is willing to spend my time doing it.  And I also understand that it requires extra product design, engineering, and assembly line complexity to include a RAM access panel or similarly easy access.  If this was an Arduino or Raspberry Pi type of device targeted at tinkerers, then I'd definitely question the decision.  But because it's a device targeted at the mass market, I completely understand why it was made.
    So you're saying that for a device to be user upgradable it must to fall in the category of an Arduino. Gotcha!
    Apple could've easily made the bottom twistable, or require a standard screwdriver, or even better, no screws at all, no hidden access points. Any combination of these efforts, which Apple has done beautifully in the past, would've kept the same circuitry yet made the RAM accessible.
  • Reply 99 of 159
    nhtnht Posts: 4,302member
    auxio said:

    This is such a dick move from Apple
    Previous version: soldered RAM, people complain.
    New version: slotted RAM, people complain. 

    Look man, if you're not comfortable using screwdrivers, you're not even a real DIY tinkerer, so why even both complaining since this is something only DIY folks do?
    I am an avid tinkerer and maker, thank you. But upgrading RAM shouldn't be this risky for the average user. Apple could've made the RAM easier to access, but they decided otherwise. Which is a dick move.
    The average user is NOT messing with this stuff...
    Dunno why people are backing Apple on this one, it's a lazy implementation of a premium product and a crappy user experience. They managed to block more tinkerers from attempting to upgrade their own RAM. Fewer people will buy it and Apple will end-up discontinuing it.
    Look, I'm someone who has done very difficult tinkering with computers in the past.  For example, to get more performance out of an old G4 TiBook, I moved one of the resistors on the motherboard which controlled the CPU speed (the hardware equivalent of BIOS overclocking on PCs).

    However, I also am open minded enough to see that I'm in a very small group of people who knows how to do this, cares about it, and/or is willing to spend my time doing it.  And I also understand that it requires extra product design, engineering, and assembly line complexity to include a RAM access panel or similarly easy access.  If this was an Arduino or Raspberry Pi type of device targeted at tinkerers, then I'd definitely question the decision.  But because it's a device targeted at the mass market, I completely understand why it was made.
    So you're saying that for a device to be user upgradable it must to fall in the category of an Arduino. Gotcha!
    Apple could've easily made the bottom twistable, or require a standard screwdriver, or even better, no screws at all, no hidden access points. Any combination of these efforts, which Apple has done beautifully in the past, would've kept the same circuitry yet made the RAM accessible.
    Quit whining...the video doesn't look hard and you only need to do this maybe once.
    auxio
  • Reply 100 of 159
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,380member

    What you need

    To start, you need a few things including a TR6 Torx security screwdriver, T9 Torx screwdriver, P5 screwdriver, a plastic spudger, a pair of DDR4-2666, 1.2V, PC4-21300, unbuffered, non-ECC RAM sticks, and an anti-static wrist strap that you know how to use properly.
    Apparently owning and knowing how to use the strap is sufficient.  Actually using it is not necessary.  At least that's what I observe in the video.  ;)
    Maybe it doesn't have to be worn on the wrist.
    philboogie
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