Apple's Dan Riccio responds to bent iPad Pro reports, says device 'meets or exceeds' produ...

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in iPad
The 2018 iPad Pro is constructed to Apple's high manufacturing standards, an executive has claimed, in response to a customer query asking about the recent reports some iPad Pro models are shipping with a slightly bent chassis.

An 11-inch iPad Pro exhibits a bend out of the box. | Source: The Verge
An 11-inch iPad Pro exhibits a bend out of the box. | Source: The Verge


Recent reports about the bends have circulated since the launch of the new iPad Pro range, with a slight curve in the chassis visible in some units supplied to customers. On Wednesday, Apple confirmed the bend is a byproduct of the manufacturing process, specifically from the cooling process affecting the tablet's metal and plastic materials.

Apple's statement also indicated that it was not considered a defect in production, and that it was seeing a normal return rate, suggesting users are either not bothered or have not noticed the issue.

One customer identified as Craig attempted to contact Apple CEO Tim Cook about the matter, but instead received a response from Apple VP of hardware engineering Dan Riccio. According to the email, provided to Macrumors, Riccio claims the iPad Pro's "unibody design meets or exceeds all of Apple's high quality standards of design and precision manufacturing."

"We've carefully engineered it and every part of the manufacturing process is precisely measured and controlled," Riccio asserts.

"Our current specification for iPad Pro flatness is up to 400 microns which is even tighter than previous generations," wrote Riccio. "This 400 micron variance is less than half a millimeter (or the width of fewer than four sheets of paper at most) and this level of flatness won't change during normal use over the lifetime of the product."

Riccio goes on to note the "slight variations" in question do not "affect the function of the device in any way."

The email goes on to advise a company statement was not provided in the original reporting on the matter, and that an official comment would be provided to media outlets. At the time of publication, no comment has been supplied.

Photos from an afflicted unit appear that the bending is appearing nearest to the plastic antenna "lines" for the cellular-capable version of the device. While Apple hasn't confirmed if the effect is limited to just LTE models, some Wi-Fi only versions have apparently suffered a similar issue according to social media posts.

The affected units arrive already bent from the factory, Apple advised. It is unclear if the bend manifests itself or becomes worse while under typical daily use. AppleInsider has confirmed that there does not appear to be a higher than normal return rate, but recommends inspecting iPad Pro units already in use or waiting to be gifted, and documenting the issue with Apple support if it appears to be bent.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 107
    Such nonsense response for a $1000 device. Your "production standards" are too low if a bent product exceeds your standards.
    danielchowavon b7zroger73msggracagilealtitudeanantksundaramlarryaksecmuthuk_vanalingamwaltg
  • Reply 2 of 107
    tzm41 said:
    Such nonsense response for a $1000 device. Your "production standards" are too low if a bent product exceeds your standards.
    Exactly. 

    And,

    Dear Apple and Mr. Cook, standards dropping much? Becoming less committed?


    edited December 2018 agilealtitudemuthuk_vanalingamelijahgairnerd
  • Reply 3 of 107
    Pathetic if those are Apple's "standards.." Steve, we miss you.
    agilealtitudedonjuanstanhope
  • Reply 4 of 107
    Yeah. That’s good to know. A more clear answer. Trolls please stop whining.
    randominternetpersonMetriacanthosauruselijahgwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 107
    So Apple are doubling down on the mantra that it’s ok. Not acceptable to tell that to someone who just bought a bent iPad from you ! Or what about to those outside the 14 day return window?

    There is a picture over at macrumours that shows an iPad Pro sitting on a table with a visible curvature to it (same story as here).  I would be gutted if that was mine and Apple declined to change it since they seem to think its not a defect. 

    The big question is whether they can get worse over time (ie after your free 14 day return period etc so they can literally turn around and say YOU bent it , or just NOT a defect.)

    Their stock dropped to $152 today. Down 33% now. Not because of this apparently but still , this is just fuel for the fire. 
    edited December 2018 agilealtitudeanantksundaramdonjuanwaltgstanhope
  • Reply 6 of 107
    The Verge has done nothing but fake news, since Apple said they did not provide any comment to them. This is a stupid media campaign thing imo . If you have bent one , please return it. This should be common sense. Trolls stop making straw men to attack Apple. 
    mwhiterandominternetpersonbloggerblogLoneStar88StrangeDayspscooter63
  • Reply 7 of 107
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,331member
    We bought an 11" iPad Pro for the office and one for each of our employees.  They are all fine... straight as an arrow.

    For those arguing that it should be perfectly straight... you do realize that this would be impossible, right? There is a certain level of play in every manufacturing process.  I think the difference with this model is how it is designed... there is no way to hide a slight curvature.  With older models, the curvature of the edges and back could possibly mask them, making them harder to detect.  I think it's reasonable to expect some sort of tolerance.  I'm not saying I'd be OK with that... if I were Apple I'd offer a replacement if it was opened and not in what the end-user considers mint condition.  However, there does need to be some kind of standard or you'll have crazy people reporting a bend that is imperceptible. 
    racerhomie3randominternetpersonyojimbo007radarthekatpscooter63bb-15
  • Reply 8 of 107
    Maybe the case meets that spec when it is milled but gets deformed during the rest of the assembly process?
    gabberattack
  • Reply 9 of 107
    Maybe the case meets that spec when it is milled but gets deformed during the rest of the assembly process?
    What are you even talking about. Return the thing if it appears bent to you.Why is this something you have to tell people.
    randominternetpersondewmeStrangeDayspscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 107
    More important than any issue, is the response. 
    larryadonjuanwaltgmuthuk_vanalingammichelb76
  • Reply 11 of 107
    More important than any issue, is the response. 
    Nope. Verge was literally lying.
    SpamSandwichStrangeDaysMetriacanthosauruspscooter63
  • Reply 12 of 107
    Maybe the case meets that spec when it is milled but gets deformed during the rest of the assembly process?
    What are you even talking about. Return the thing if it appears bent to you.Why is this something you have to tell people.
    Why are you repeatedly saying "just return it"?  I think everyone here knows to return it if it bent.  But you seem hell bent (intented) on trying to down play the issue.  People hold Apple to higher standards because Apple holds themselves to higher standards.  They're responses to this issue, thus far don't reflect a high standard.  It smacks of legalese.  
    It's pretty obvious some of the bending is beyond 400 microns.  That's not explained by "tolerances".  The issue should be addressed properly so that people have confidence in the products they're buying.  "Return 'til you get a good one" isn't the solution.
    donjuangabberattackelijahgmuthuk_vanalingamairnerd
  • Reply 13 of 107
    Maybe the case meets that spec when it is milled but gets deformed during the rest of the assembly process?
    What are you even talking about. Return the thing if it appears bent to you.Why is this something you have to tell people.
    Why are you repeatedly saying "just return it"?  I think everyone here knows to return it if it bent.  But you seem hell bent (intented) on trying to down play the issue.  People hold Apple to higher standards because Apple holds themselves to higher standards.  They're responses to this issue, thus far don't reflect a high standard.  It smacks of legalese.  
    It's pretty obvious some of the bending is beyond 400 microns.  That's not explained by "tolerances".  The issue should be addressed properly so that people have confidence in the products they're buying.  "Return 'til you get a good one" isn't the solution.
    That's not "pretty obvious" at all.

    The statement says that the tolerances are 400 microns.  That's an interesting fact.  If you get one that is off by more than 400 microns then Apple considers it defective, just like they would if you get one that has a screen that doesn't work.  They ship millions of devices; some will be defective.  Now we know where that line is.  We have no data about what percentage of new iPod pros are > 400 microns versus 100-399 microns versus <99 microns (none are 0 microns).  Without data, we have no idea if this is a problem or the typical internet mountain out of a molehill.
    SpamSandwichStrangeDaysMetriacanthosauruselijahgpscooter63uraharawatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 107
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,213member
    “The device doesn’t meet standards”
    ”change the standards”
    ”Ok - it meets the standards now. Problem solved!”

    Cynism aside, my rule of thumb would be that it shouldn’t rock or swivel if you lay it on a flat surface. It’s hard to tell from the pictures, but the ones I’ve seen appear to be bent more than 400 microns/0.4 mm and enough to cause rocking when laid down. We don’t know what the standards are for previous ipad generations, but I’d be curious to know how much of a bend there was in a sampling of past generation devices. My first gen 12” iPad Pro has no detectable bend, for whatever that’s worth. 
    donjuan
  • Reply 15 of 107
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,343administrator
    More important than any issue, is the response. 
    Nope. Verge was literally lying.
    We don't think that's the case.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 16 of 107
    tzm41 said:
    Such nonsense response for a $1000 device. Your "production standards" are too low if a bent product exceeds your standards.


    "We don't ship junk"
    Steve Jobs
    donjuanairnerd
  • Reply 17 of 107
    Merry Curve-gate y'all

    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 18 of 107
    Here's a useful exercise.  Grab a piece of paper and a ruler.  Draw a 10-inch line using the ruler.  Now at the mid-point of the line, mark a point half a millimeter to the left or right of the line.  Now make a triangle out of this by connecting the two ends of the original line to the new dot.  Even if you used a fine point mechanical pencil (.5mm or .3mm), to draw these lines, there is no "daylight" inside this triangle.  Now hold the paper up to your eye, looking down the line.  You will see the "bend" even though for all intents and purposes, there is no bend.  If someone gets an iPad with this level of "bend" and wants to return it, that says more about them than Apple.

    And if they have more of a bend then that, then Apple considers that defective.  There is no story here.
    wonkothesaneJFC_PAdws-2StrangeDaysradarthekatelijahgpscooter63basjhjwatto_cobraAppleLover30
  • Reply 19 of 107
    Typically when you machine/hog out aluminum from a single surface, you will get a potato chip when you pull the part from the machine (the stress locked in place by the calendar-rolling process in the mill is now released). To counter this, there’s typically a skim cut done on the opposite surface. I presume this 7000 series aluminum is all being machined in a tempered condition.

    Something is likely occurring down the line, and my guess would be this is limited to a small batch of units.

    If affected return to Apple, let them trace it back through the fabrication process to the source, if it hasn’t already been corrected. 
    tmayrandominternetpersonJFC_PAblurpbleepbloopGG1burnsideracerhomie3StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 107
    sandorsandor Posts: 505member
    The Reality distortion field is strong on this one.
    Bud may be pleased? to see it didn't die with Jobs after all...
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