How the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max will fare against the Samsung Galaxy S10

13»

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 50
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Huawei is China.  I fixed it for you.  By public law, Huawei IS China.  There is no secret about it.  Written into law.  

    You can say this or that ... but dude, it is the freaking law!

    And of course, you believing everything Huawei says in a freaking presentation is just ridiculously naive.  Who are you trying to convince here?  

    Huawei is a cheater...fake benchmarks, fake claims.  Huawei breaks laws (and more often than not, INTERNATIONAL law).  Huawei top exec jailed for spying in Poland.  Huawei CFO jailed and is wanted in two countries.  There is no conspiracy dude.  Get over it.  Stop with this propaganda crap.

    Please stop with this idiocy.  Geez.
    tmaywatto_cobraSpamSandwich
  • Reply 42 of 50
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,664member
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Huawei is China.  I fixed it for you.  By public law, Huawei IS China.  There is no secret about it.  Written into law.  

    You can say this or that ... but dude, it is the freaking law!

    And of course, you believing everything Huawei says in a freaking presentation is just ridiculously naive.  Who are you trying to convince here?  

    Huawei is a cheater...fake benchmarks, fake claims.  Huawei breaks laws (and more often than not, INTERNATIONAL law).  Huawei top exec jailed for spying in Poland.  Huawei CFO jailed and is wanted in two countries.  There is no conspiracy dude.  Get over it.  Stop with this propaganda crap.

    Please stop with this idiocy.  Geez.
    So, I must repeat myself. Which part of the official presentation wasn't true?

    It was contrasted directly with the X50.

    Enlighten me.

    'Idiocy' is claiming things that have been presented officially are not true without anything to prove otherwise. Saying 'Geez' does nothing to make what you are claiming any truer.

    Perhaps you didn't even watch the presentation.

    If the S10 ships with an X50 5G variant and Huawei ships a Balong 5000 equipped, which one has more appeal as of today and what we have been told? Not what you think you know because clearly you have nothing -although I wait with bated breath your evidence.

  • Reply 43 of 50
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Huawei is China.  I fixed it for you.  By public law, Huawei IS China.  There is no secret about it.  Written into law.  

    You can say this or that ... but dude, it is the freaking law!

    And of course, you believing everything Huawei says in a freaking presentation is just ridiculously naive.  Who are you trying to convince here?  

    Huawei is a cheater...fake benchmarks, fake claims.  Huawei breaks laws (and more often than not, INTERNATIONAL law).  Huawei top exec jailed for spying in Poland.  Huawei CFO jailed and is wanted in two countries.  There is no conspiracy dude.  Get over it.  Stop with this propaganda crap.

    Please stop with this idiocy.  Geez.
    So, I must repeat myself. Which part of the official presentation wasn't true?

    It was contrasted directly with the X50.

    Enlighten me.

    'Idiocy' is claiming things that have been presented officially are not true without anything to prove otherwise. Saying 'Geez' does nothing to make what you are claiming any truer.

    Perhaps you didn't even watch the presentation.

    If the S10 ships with an X50 5G variant and Huawei ships a Balong 5000 equipped, which one has more appeal as of today and what we have been told? Not what you think you know because clearly you have nothing -although I wait with bated breath your evidence.

    These have not been released...thus, you’re basing on ASSUMPTIONS by the presentations of respective companies.  Not real data.  No facts.  Nothing.  Just by word of mouth from Huawei.

    Let’s look at what we CAN compare factually.  Huawei Kirin 980 presentation was full of unsubstantiated claims and boasting (how it was better than Apple and Qualcomm mobile chips etc.).......that are very much false.  Lies.  Acutally, not even close to the truth!  LOL

    Let’s look at Huawei’s cheating on benchmarks.  Repeatedly caught.  Over and over again.  Then, last one, they call it “Artificial Intelligence” mode!  LOL

    Their top execs are jailed by various countries.  More and more countries (not just USA) are dumping Huawei equipments due to spying concerns.   That “30 carriers” number you quoted has just been going down every day of the week!

    China laws dictate that Huawei IS indeed China.  There is no ifs ands or buts.  Huawei is China.  Huawei is China’s little biatch.

    No need to wait for my response.  You need to get your head out of your behind and stop with this BS propaganda crap.  Pure utter silliness on your end.
    edited January 26 watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 50
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,664member
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Huawei is China.  I fixed it for you.  By public law, Huawei IS China.  There is no secret about it.  Written into law.  

    You can say this or that ... but dude, it is the freaking law!

    And of course, you believing everything Huawei says in a freaking presentation is just ridiculously naive.  Who are you trying to convince here?  

    Huawei is a cheater...fake benchmarks, fake claims.  Huawei breaks laws (and more often than not, INTERNATIONAL law).  Huawei top exec jailed for spying in Poland.  Huawei CFO jailed and is wanted in two countries.  There is no conspiracy dude.  Get over it.  Stop with this propaganda crap.

    Please stop with this idiocy.  Geez.
    So, I must repeat myself. Which part of the official presentation wasn't true?

    It was contrasted directly with the X50.

    Enlighten me.

    'Idiocy' is claiming things that have been presented officially are not true without anything to prove otherwise. Saying 'Geez' does nothing to make what you are claiming any truer.

    Perhaps you didn't even watch the presentation.

    If the S10 ships with an X50 5G variant and Huawei ships a Balong 5000 equipped, which one has more appeal as of today and what we have been told? Not what you think you know because clearly you have nothing -although I wait with bated breath your evidence.

    These have not been released...thus, you’re basing on ASSUMPTIONS by the presentations of respective companies.  Not real data.  No facts.  Nothing.  Just by word of mouth from Huawei.

    Let’s look at what we CAN compare factually.  Huawei Kirin 980 presentation was full of unsubstantiated claims and boasting (how it was better than Apple and Qualcomm mobile chips etc.).......that are very much false.  Lies.  Acutally, not even close to the truth!  LOL

    Let’s look at Huawei’s cheating on benchmarks.  Repeatedly caught.  Over and over again.  Then, last one, they call it “Artificial Intelligence” mode!  LOL

    Their top execs are jailed by various countries.  More and more countries (not just USA) are dumping Huawei equipments due to spying concerns.   That “30 carriers” number you quoted has just been going down every day of the week!

    China laws dictate that Huawei IS indeed China.  There is no ifs ands or buts.  Huawei is China.  Huawei is China’s little biatch.

    No need to wait for my response.  You need to get your head out of your behind and stop with this BS propaganda crap.  Pure utter silliness on your end.
    And there you have it.

    You have nothing.

    Let's do things the correct way. Take things for how they are presented and then take them to down if they are not true. Not the other way around. That is silly.

    Now watch the presentation yourself and at least try to understand the differences.

    Of course, if you had bothered to watch the presentation in the first place, none of this conversation would have been necessary in the first place.

    I included a link to the presentation in this thread:

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/209204/qualcomm-doesnt-wield-enough-power-to-harm-competition-says-trial-witness#latest

    And for the same news from an Apple focussed site:

    https://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2019/01/huawei-introduced-a-5g-home-modem-yesterday-while-revealing-that-theyll-be-introducing-5g-folding-smartphones-at-mwc.html
    edited January 26 gatorguy
  • Reply 45 of 50
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Huawei is China.  I fixed it for you.  By public law, Huawei IS China.  There is no secret about it.  Written into law.  

    You can say this or that ... but dude, it is the freaking law!

    And of course, you believing everything Huawei says in a freaking presentation is just ridiculously naive.  Who are you trying to convince here?  

    Huawei is a cheater...fake benchmarks, fake claims.  Huawei breaks laws (and more often than not, INTERNATIONAL law).  Huawei top exec jailed for spying in Poland.  Huawei CFO jailed and is wanted in two countries.  There is no conspiracy dude.  Get over it.  Stop with this propaganda crap.

    Please stop with this idiocy.  Geez.
    So, I must repeat myself. Which part of the official presentation wasn't true?

    It was contrasted directly with the X50.

    Enlighten me.

    'Idiocy' is claiming things that have been presented officially are not true without anything to prove otherwise. Saying 'Geez' does nothing to make what you are claiming any truer.

    Perhaps you didn't even watch the presentation.

    If the S10 ships with an X50 5G variant and Huawei ships a Balong 5000 equipped, which one has more appeal as of today and what we have been told? Not what you think you know because clearly you have nothing -although I wait with bated breath your evidence.

    These have not been released...thus, you’re basing on ASSUMPTIONS by the presentations of respective companies.  Not real data.  No facts.  Nothing.  Just by word of mouth from Huawei.

    Let’s look at what we CAN compare factually.  Huawei Kirin 980 presentation was full of unsubstantiated claims and boasting (how it was better than Apple and Qualcomm mobile chips etc.).......that are very much false.  Lies.  Acutally, not even close to the truth!  LOL

    Let’s look at Huawei’s cheating on benchmarks.  Repeatedly caught.  Over and over again.  Then, last one, they call it “Artificial Intelligence” mode!  LOL

    Their top execs are jailed by various countries.  More and more countries (not just USA) are dumping Huawei equipments due to spying concerns.   That “30 carriers” number you quoted has just been going down every day of the week!

    China laws dictate that Huawei IS indeed China.  There is no ifs ands or buts.  Huawei is China.  Huawei is China’s little biatch.

    No need to wait for my response.  You need to get your head out of your behind and stop with this BS propaganda crap.  Pure utter silliness on your end.
    And there you have it.

    You have nothing.

    Let's do things the correct way. Take things for how they are presented and then take them to down if they are not true. Not the other way around. That is silly.

    Now watch the presentation yourself and at least try to understand the differences.

    Of course, if you had bothered to watch the presentation in the first place, none of this conversation would have been necessary in the first place.

    I included a link to the presentation in this thread:

    https://forums.appleinsider.com/discussion/209204/qualcomm-doesnt-wield-enough-power-to-harm-competition-says-trial-witness#latest
    There you have it.  You make it seems like Huawei never lies about their claims. Lol. Huawei actually has been lying about their tech year after year...and they don’t care that they get caught either!

    How can you take something down when it has not seen the light of day??  You are basing everything on what Huawei has said.  Assumptions by you based on Huawei’s presentation. Nothing else.  No actual comparison by a 3rd party.  Nothing.  Zippo.   THAT is downright ignorant of you.  Silly is not it.  Ignorance.  Blind fanboyism.

    Why are you here?  Every other post, you push this Huawei agenda crap.  WTF?!
    edited January 26 watto_cobra
  • Reply 46 of 50
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,669member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Your being an apologist for Huawei isn't going to delink China from Huawei, in fact or in the public consciousness, when it comes to national security. It's those "significant connections" to the Communist Party and Military Establishment that is the problem, starting at the top of Huawei's management.

    The only link between China and Huawei is the same as would be expected from any ICT company and its national government. That is what is important.

    I suggest you read some of the recent interviews with Ren that touch on that exact subject.

    If there are any spying charges, put them in the public domain as Huawei has requested.

    The problem is that not only has the US not done that but it believes it isn't even necessary. I wonder what they would think if the boot were on the other foot and all the while we know (thanks to Snowden) that it was in fact the US that was trying to spy on China and Huawei was a major target.

    See a problem there?

    Most of the world's communications transport already flows through Huawei gear and there are no problems. That is the nature of international communications.

    The real problem is that the US was falling behind on the next generation of communications tech and feared being overtaken. Something that was very likely. 

    Now, with 5G phones a reality (February announcement) and with the Balong 5000 looking to be far more complete than any other product announced so far, Huawei looks to be very well placed to take control of one of the biggest markets on earth as well as being perfectly compatible with future 5G infrastructure elsewhere (using Huawei backbone gear or not).

    So, if the S10 has a 5G variant running the X50, it already looks like it won't compete well with Balong 5000 (for which the Kirin 980 is already compatible on a SoC level). Apple might not even be in the 5G market until very late 2020.




    So, essentially, your argument is that Huawei is being held hostage by the Chinese Government, but they are really freedom loving capitalists, yearning to spread their wings.

    Fuck that nonsense. They have close ties to the PLA, Communist party, and the President For Life. How do you think that they got where they are today?

    One thing that is near absolute about the Intelligence business, is that they never reveal how they obtained the information. Your request for such from Western Democracies "to place that information in the public domain" is a red herring.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 47 of 50
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,664member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Your being an apologist for Huawei isn't going to delink China from Huawei, in fact or in the public consciousness, when it comes to national security. It's those "significant connections" to the Communist Party and Military Establishment that is the problem, starting at the top of Huawei's management.

    The only link between China and Huawei is the same as would be expected from any ICT company and its national government. That is what is important.

    I suggest you read some of the recent interviews with Ren that touch on that exact subject.

    If there are any spying charges, put them in the public domain as Huawei has requested.

    The problem is that not only has the US not done that but it believes it isn't even necessary. I wonder what they would think if the boot were on the other foot and all the while we know (thanks to Snowden) that it was in fact the US that was trying to spy on China and Huawei was a major target.

    See a problem there?

    Most of the world's communications transport already flows through Huawei gear and there are no problems. That is the nature of international communications.

    The real problem is that the US was falling behind on the next generation of communications tech and feared being overtaken. Something that was very likely. 

    Now, with 5G phones a reality (February announcement) and with the Balong 5000 looking to be far more complete than any other product announced so far, Huawei looks to be very well placed to take control of one of the biggest markets on earth as well as being perfectly compatible with future 5G infrastructure elsewhere (using Huawei backbone gear or not).

    So, if the S10 has a 5G variant running the X50, it already looks like it won't compete well with Balong 5000 (for which the Kirin 980 is already compatible on a SoC level). Apple might not even be in the 5G market until very late 2020.




    So, essentially, your argument is that Huawei is being held hostage by the Chinese Government, but they are really freedom loving capitalists, yearning to spread their wings.

    Fuck that nonsense. They have close ties to the PLA, Communist party, and the President For Life. How do you think that they got where they are today?

    One thing that is near absolute about the Intelligence business, is that they never reveal how they obtained the information. Your request for such from Western Democracies "to place that information in the public domain" is a red herring.
    Without veering into politics, Huawei got where it is today by producing better products at lower prices AND investing absolutely HUGE amounts in R&D AND having 80,000 engineers involved in the process.

    Not only that, they took important strategic decisions way before competitors.

    The global fruits of this situation began to appear in 2016.
  • Reply 48 of 50
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,669member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Your being an apologist for Huawei isn't going to delink China from Huawei, in fact or in the public consciousness, when it comes to national security. It's those "significant connections" to the Communist Party and Military Establishment that is the problem, starting at the top of Huawei's management.

    The only link between China and Huawei is the same as would be expected from any ICT company and its national government. That is what is important.

    I suggest you read some of the recent interviews with Ren that touch on that exact subject.

    If there are any spying charges, put them in the public domain as Huawei has requested.

    The problem is that not only has the US not done that but it believes it isn't even necessary. I wonder what they would think if the boot were on the other foot and all the while we know (thanks to Snowden) that it was in fact the US that was trying to spy on China and Huawei was a major target.

    See a problem there?

    Most of the world's communications transport already flows through Huawei gear and there are no problems. That is the nature of international communications.

    The real problem is that the US was falling behind on the next generation of communications tech and feared being overtaken. Something that was very likely. 

    Now, with 5G phones a reality (February announcement) and with the Balong 5000 looking to be far more complete than any other product announced so far, Huawei looks to be very well placed to take control of one of the biggest markets on earth as well as being perfectly compatible with future 5G infrastructure elsewhere (using Huawei backbone gear or not).

    So, if the S10 has a 5G variant running the X50, it already looks like it won't compete well with Balong 5000 (for which the Kirin 980 is already compatible on a SoC level). Apple might not even be in the 5G market until very late 2020.




    So, essentially, your argument is that Huawei is being held hostage by the Chinese Government, but they are really freedom loving capitalists, yearning to spread their wings.

    Fuck that nonsense. They have close ties to the PLA, Communist party, and the President For Life. How do you think that they got where they are today?

    One thing that is near absolute about the Intelligence business, is that they never reveal how they obtained the information. Your request for such from Western Democracies "to place that information in the public domain" is a red herring.
    Without veering into politics, Huawei got where it is today by producing better products at lower prices AND investing absolutely HUGE amounts in R&D AND having 80,000 engineers involved in the process.

    Not only that, they took important strategic decisions way before competitors.

    The global fruits of this situation began to appear in 2016.
    How much of that is by design of the Government of China?

    Huawei, The Government and The Party, are inseparable.

    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/politics-of-economics/0/steps/30823

    "China has gone a long way to becoming a market – capitalist – economy. It has opened up to foreign investment (much more than, say, India). Its firms compete internationally and invest overseas. Some Chinese entrepreneurs like Jack Ma have global recognition. Day to day economic life operates through markets and farmers have greater (but not complete) ownership rights. There is a sophisticated stock exchange and capital markets.

    Most of the small to medium sized companies which have flourished in export markets are however not ‘private’ in a Western sense but have close links with local government. Moreover, almost all the large and successful Chinese companies are state owned and the few major genuinely private companies (like Huawei, Lenovo and Ali Baba) have close links with government. State enterprises, albeit highly efficient and competitive, dominate banking, energy and telecoms.

    Plans to dilute that dominance have stopped or gone into reverse under President Ji. The Communist Party has to be consulted on major business decisions. And while a key theme of Deng’s reforms was decentralization away from central government, the process has stopped or gone into reverse. Pervasive corruption at local level is being reined in at the cost of greater central party control. And central control over access to the Internet limits the extent to which the, now, vast Chinese, educated, middle class can participate in an open exchange of information and ideas."

    edited January 26 watto_cobra
  • Reply 49 of 50
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 3,664member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Your being an apologist for Huawei isn't going to delink China from Huawei, in fact or in the public consciousness, when it comes to national security. It's those "significant connections" to the Communist Party and Military Establishment that is the problem, starting at the top of Huawei's management.

    The only link between China and Huawei is the same as would be expected from any ICT company and its national government. That is what is important.

    I suggest you read some of the recent interviews with Ren that touch on that exact subject.

    If there are any spying charges, put them in the public domain as Huawei has requested.

    The problem is that not only has the US not done that but it believes it isn't even necessary. I wonder what they would think if the boot were on the other foot and all the while we know (thanks to Snowden) that it was in fact the US that was trying to spy on China and Huawei was a major target.

    See a problem there?

    Most of the world's communications transport already flows through Huawei gear and there are no problems. That is the nature of international communications.

    The real problem is that the US was falling behind on the next generation of communications tech and feared being overtaken. Something that was very likely. 

    Now, with 5G phones a reality (February announcement) and with the Balong 5000 looking to be far more complete than any other product announced so far, Huawei looks to be very well placed to take control of one of the biggest markets on earth as well as being perfectly compatible with future 5G infrastructure elsewhere (using Huawei backbone gear or not).

    So, if the S10 has a 5G variant running the X50, it already looks like it won't compete well with Balong 5000 (for which the Kirin 980 is already compatible on a SoC level). Apple might not even be in the 5G market until very late 2020.




    So, essentially, your argument is that Huawei is being held hostage by the Chinese Government, but they are really freedom loving capitalists, yearning to spread their wings.

    Fuck that nonsense. They have close ties to the PLA, Communist party, and the President For Life. How do you think that they got where they are today?

    One thing that is near absolute about the Intelligence business, is that they never reveal how they obtained the information. Your request for such from Western Democracies "to place that information in the public domain" is a red herring.
    Without veering into politics, Huawei got where it is today by producing better products at lower prices AND investing absolutely HUGE amounts in R&D AND having 80,000 engineers involved in the process.

    Not only that, they took important strategic decisions way before competitors.

    The global fruits of this situation began to appear in 2016.
    How much of that is by design of the Government of China?

    Huawei, The Government and The Party, are inseparable.

    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/politics-of-economics/0/steps/30823

    "China has gone a long way to becoming a market – capitalist – economy. It has opened up to foreign investment (much more than, say, India). Its firms compete internationally and invest overseas. Some Chinese entrepreneurs like Jack Ma have global recognition. Day to day economic life operates through markets and farmers have greater (but not complete) ownership rights. There is a sophisticated stock exchange and capital markets.

    Most of the small to medium sized companies which have flourished in export markets are however not ‘private’ in a Western sense but have close links with local government. Moreover, almost all the large and successful Chinese companies are state owned and the few major genuinely private companies (like Huawei, Lenovo and Ali Baba) have close links with government. State enterprises, albeit highly efficient and competitive, dominate banking, energy and telecoms.

    Plans to dilute that dominance have stopped or gone into reverse under President Ji. The Communist Party has to be consulted on major business decisions. And while a key theme of Deng’s reforms was decentralization away from central government, the process has stopped or gone into reverse. Pervasive corruption at local level is being reined in at the cost of greater central party control. And central control over access to the Internet limits the extent to which the, now, vast Chinese, educated, middle class can participate in an open exchange of information and ideas."

    As I said before and Huawei itself says, its links are those of any other major ICT (or any other major strategic company) anywhere in the world.

    You are looking at the issue of government involvement in private enterprise from an entirely selective viewpoint. The Broadcom takeover story is a classic example of government intervention in private enterprise. Sometimes there is no getting away from it. Boeing could be considered a preferred partner of the US government for example and to be 'protected', just look at what the US government tried to do with Bombardier. How much of a link is there between Boeing and government then?


    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/html/146485.htm&ved=2ahUKEwjY6LfdyI3gAhUo3OAKHZBdDyEQFjAKegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw3SZ_oO6KpmVrg7LnOUmg0p [pdf]

    These are the results of being strategically important. Nothing more. Could things be more transparent? Yes, but that applies to everyone:

    https://amp.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/04/why-strong-ties-between-business-and-government-matter-r-and-d

    I think we should let this swing back to the S10 and iPhones. Just open another thread if you want to continue with Huawei.




    edited January 27
  • Reply 50 of 50
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,669member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Madtiger said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    clarker99 said:
    Do the majority of Apple users even care what Android OEM’s are doing? (And vice versa?)
    It's an industry thing. We need to look past platform specifics and see what's happening on a wider level.

    People care when they are asked to pay high prices and certain features are missing but available on competing phones. In fact they even care when paying far less. Often you want the best deal possible for the price you pay, irrespective of platform.

    The S10 is the Samsung iPhone X (ten year phone) and is supposed to be a key release. We'll see what it brings to the table but competition (P30 Pro) is going to be fierce.

    MWC will bring a heap of announcements.

    MWC will bring nothing new. It will all be minor incremental updates to existing technology that people will blow out of proportion as to their relevance. Then when the iPhone comes out with its incremental updates in the fall it will be criticized for lack of innovation.

    - We’ll get newer OLED screens in a few new sizes/resolutions, but none of them will be calibrated for color accuracy so they’re all pointless.
    - We’ll get newer slightly faster (but still inferior to Apple) processors which will mean nothing because Android Apps are a joke and none of them can utilize those processors anyway.
    - We’ll get a bunch of new tablets with 1-2 year old processors that still won’t be able to compete with the iPad along with the same unoptimized phone Apps blown up to fit.
    - We’ll get new Chromebooks that most Android Apps still won’t work properly on and still limited by the lack of serious Apps for Chrome.
    - We’ll get Windows on ARM laptops that are still slow and are still limited as to what types of Apps they can run.

    Oh, and everything mobile will be on Android so there won’t be anything new to see on the software side,
    Not long to wait:

    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/news/huawei-p30-pro-camera-more-details-leak-and-its-all-about-the-10x-zoom-and-3d-sensors

    https://www.gizmochina.com/2019/01/24/huawei-announces-balong-5000-5g-modem-with-up-to-6-5-gbps-5g-speeds-in-china/

    https://www.xda-developers.com/huawei-foldable-5g-smartphone-mwc-2019/

    'Nothing new' doesn't sit well with the above rumours. Throw in Samsung announcements, IoT developments and all the 5G progress and things look quite interesting.




    Nope, nothing new. How can something be “new” when you’re able to link to article with details? I don’t think you understand what “new” really means.

    5G? Yawn. Let me know when it will be usable by more than a fraction of the population. And whose networks are they going to access with their modem since Huawei is having a hard time getting companies/countries to install their spy gear?

    MWC is going to be a big bore with lots of promises but few realized.
    The links are to - rumours - except for the Balong5000 presentation which is from today and was the - MWC2019 pre-briefing.

    It's all part of official the MWC build up and is just the core technology of some aspects. No one has any idea about how that will be used. For that we have to wait for the fair itself.

    Balong5000 is far from yawn worthy. Out of the gate it is making the X50 look quite limited in its scope. A complete, ready to market, power efficient, low latency, multimode, V2X ready, Kirin980 compatible solution.

    They have already signed 30 carrier deals and shipped thousands of new 5G base stations. Obviously China will see most of the tent pole features first but somewhere along the line users of the supposed 5G S10 variant will reap the benefits, as competing 5G backbone solutions are said to be around a year behind what Huawei is actually shipping today.
    Huawei 5G...irrelevant.  I lost count now how many countries are on the list to ban Huawei stuff.  Almost everyday, a new Western country considering banning Huawei crap.
    You lost count after how many? 

    Huawei has already signed 30 carrier deals and is shipping thousands of 5G base stations. That is hardly irrelevant. As for being crap, can you name anyone in the 5G industry that has better products? It's not me who says competitors are behind, it is carriers and industry watchers.


    Politics more than technology, no?
    https://www.greyb.com/companies-working-on-5g-technology/

    There are plenty of companies working on 5G, and to look at the patents that these companies generate, it would appear the Qualcomm exceeds any other company by a wide margin, including Huawei. That doesn't mean much, but it does suggest that your post that Huawei makes better products than any other is bullshit. Huawei often has the lowest prices, hence why various countries that are banning Huawei telecom are expecting to see cost increases for 5G buildout. 

    France has decided against allowing Huawei to buildout 5G, and Germany is likely to ban Huawei as well, likely of benefit to Nokia, Ericsson and others in Europe. The Chinese spy found in Huawei's "employ" in Poland may have an effect on any 5G buildout there.
    Huawei is ahead in real product development. See link above and see clains from carriers affirming that using non Huawei gear would be like adding a year to roll outs.

    Just look at how far ahead Huawei is on the modem side (yesterday's Balong5000 presentation).

    From the FT link above and citing a US official on the state of 5G with regards to Chinese technology:

    "We're losing it"
    So, assuming that countries that ban Huawei are a year behind, so what. There's so little buildout today, that it isn't going to be an issue, and as other suppliers ramp up, that "head start" that Huawei has won't make any difference.

    I'm sure that Huawei will do very well in Spain though...

    As for the modem, again, so what.
    It's also cheaper. That alone might be enough to put operators in rural America out of business as many depend on Huawei gear.

    'so what' on the modem? Look one step ahead. As soon as the hardware gets deployed, applications for the technology can be developed. 5G has such enormous scope that being first to market means far more than consumer side benefits. The Balong 5G is even V2X compliant. From there it will just get better.

    That's why the US is doing everything it can (and then some!) to derail Huawei. The politics of a powershift in tech. Hence that comment: 'we're losing it' in reference to the US falling behind in such a key area.

    The US even went so far as to claim that it didn't need to provide evidence of what it was claiming on Huawei. That says a lot about how things are going.
    Here's an example of China attempting to subvert laws regarding U.S. Technology transfer;

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25364/boeing-nixes-satellite-deal-amid-concerns-the-u-s-buyer-was-a-chinese-government-front?iid=sr-link5

    Boeing says it has canceled a controversial satellite order from a U.S.-based startup, which had received the bulk of its funding from a Chinese-government owned financial company. The deal, which critics warned could give China access to sensitive technology, comes amid a period of especially acrimonious relations between Washington and Beijing over a host of issues, including industrial espionage and intellectual property theft.

    The Chicago-headquartered aerospace company announced its decision, which it said was only because of non-payment on the part of the customer, to nix the deal, worth more than $200 million, on Dec. 6, 2018. Two days earlier, the Wall Street Journal had published an expose detailing the links between the official buyer, Global IP, and a string of Chinese government operated entities and individuals with significant connections to China’s Communist Party and military establishment.

    “When we resigned over a year ago, we informed Boeing of the reasons for our decision,” Emil Youssefzadeh, one of Global IP’s founders, told the Journal, referring to concerns about China's involvement and a hope that the company would be able to shake off worrisome Chinese government influence. “It’s unfortunate that this did not happen at the time.”   

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-maneuvers-to-snag-top-secret-boeing-satellite-technology-1543943490?&mod=article_inline&mod=article_inline

    There is no Corporation with independence of the Chinese Government, the Communist Party, or the PLA, hence why this deal fell through, and the many democracies that are banning Huawei telecom. Your naivete about National Security concerns isn't winning you any arguments.

    Huawei is not China. 
    Your being an apologist for Huawei isn't going to delink China from Huawei, in fact or in the public consciousness, when it comes to national security. It's those "significant connections" to the Communist Party and Military Establishment that is the problem, starting at the top of Huawei's management.

    The only link between China and Huawei is the same as would be expected from any ICT company and its national government. That is what is important.

    I suggest you read some of the recent interviews with Ren that touch on that exact subject.

    If there are any spying charges, put them in the public domain as Huawei has requested.

    The problem is that not only has the US not done that but it believes it isn't even necessary. I wonder what they would think if the boot were on the other foot and all the while we know (thanks to Snowden) that it was in fact the US that was trying to spy on China and Huawei was a major target.

    See a problem there?

    Most of the world's communications transport already flows through Huawei gear and there are no problems. That is the nature of international communications.

    The real problem is that the US was falling behind on the next generation of communications tech and feared being overtaken. Something that was very likely. 

    Now, with 5G phones a reality (February announcement) and with the Balong 5000 looking to be far more complete than any other product announced so far, Huawei looks to be very well placed to take control of one of the biggest markets on earth as well as being perfectly compatible with future 5G infrastructure elsewhere (using Huawei backbone gear or not).

    So, if the S10 has a 5G variant running the X50, it already looks like it won't compete well with Balong 5000 (for which the Kirin 980 is already compatible on a SoC level). Apple might not even be in the 5G market until very late 2020.




    So, essentially, your argument is that Huawei is being held hostage by the Chinese Government, but they are really freedom loving capitalists, yearning to spread their wings.

    Fuck that nonsense. They have close ties to the PLA, Communist party, and the President For Life. How do you think that they got where they are today?

    One thing that is near absolute about the Intelligence business, is that they never reveal how they obtained the information. Your request for such from Western Democracies "to place that information in the public domain" is a red herring.
    Without veering into politics, Huawei got where it is today by producing better products at lower prices AND investing absolutely HUGE amounts in R&D AND having 80,000 engineers involved in the process.

    Not only that, they took important strategic decisions way before competitors.

    The global fruits of this situation began to appear in 2016.
    How much of that is by design of the Government of China?

    Huawei, The Government and The Party, are inseparable.

    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/politics-of-economics/0/steps/30823

    "China has gone a long way to becoming a market – capitalist – economy. It has opened up to foreign investment (much more than, say, India). Its firms compete internationally and invest overseas. Some Chinese entrepreneurs like Jack Ma have global recognition. Day to day economic life operates through markets and farmers have greater (but not complete) ownership rights. There is a sophisticated stock exchange and capital markets.

    Most of the small to medium sized companies which have flourished in export markets are however not ‘private’ in a Western sense but have close links with local government. Moreover, almost all the large and successful Chinese companies are state owned and the few major genuinely private companies (like Huawei, Lenovo and Ali Baba) have close links with government. State enterprises, albeit highly efficient and competitive, dominate banking, energy and telecoms.

    Plans to dilute that dominance have stopped or gone into reverse under President Ji. The Communist Party has to be consulted on major business decisions. And while a key theme of Deng’s reforms was decentralization away from central government, the process has stopped or gone into reverse. Pervasive corruption at local level is being reined in at the cost of greater central party control. And central control over access to the Internet limits the extent to which the, now, vast Chinese, educated, middle class can participate in an open exchange of information and ideas."

    As I said before and Huawei itself says, its links are those of any other major ICT (or any other major strategic company) anywhere in the world.

    You are looking at the issue of government involvement in private enterprise from an entirely selective viewpoint. The Broadcom takeover story is a classic example of government intervention in private enterprise. Sometimes there is no getting away from it. Boeing could be considered a preferred partner of the US government for example and to be 'protected', just look at what the US government tried to do with Bombardier. How much of a link is there between Boeing and government then?


    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/html/146485.htm&ved=2ahUKEwjY6LfdyI3gAhUo3OAKHZBdDyEQFjAKegQIARAB&usg=AOvVaw3SZ_oO6KpmVrg7LnOUmg0p [pdf]

    These are the results of being strategically important. Nothing more. Could things be more transparent? Yes, but that applies to everyone:

    https://amp.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/04/why-strong-ties-between-business-and-government-matter-r-and-d

    I think we should let this swing back to the S10 and iPhones. Just open another thread if you want to continue with Huawei.




    Boeing is also part of the Military Industrial Complex in the U.S., as are most of the major aerospace manufactures in the world, such as Airbus and BAE Systems in their respective partner countries, serving both civilian and military requirements.

    Apple is specifically a consumer electronics company, and as such, has no preferential governmental ties in the U.S. over any other consumer electronics company in any other Western Democracy. Any of them that want to sell in the U.S. basically have to prove that they meet FCC requirements, and minimal consumer electronics requirements for safety, energy and disposal/recycling.

    Huawei, on the other hand, has a broad operation that does in fact serve the needs of the Chinese Government for security and telecom. Perhaps it would be appropriate to spinoff Huawei's smartphones to an independent company, and with a rebrand and new management, they would be equivalent of other Chinese brands that are allowed to be sold in the U.S. 

    Either way, the Broadcom, a company based in Singapore, was disallowed by the Committee for Foreign Investment in the U.S. for national security reasons.

    https://bgr.com/2018/03/13/broadcom-qualcomm-deal-huawei-trump/

    "
    But Huawei is still the reason why Trump’s administration intervened to block the purchase. The US government is worried that Broadcom would slowdown Qualcomm’s 5G R&D spending, a move that would solidify Huawei’s lead and favor China. The real reason why the government is taking all these measures against a Chinese company is a different one: Huawei’s ties with the Chinese government aren’t exactly clear. The company tried for years to distance itself from Beijing but was never able to fully explain its relationship with the government. That’s why the heads of various US intelligence agencies managed to block US carriers from selling Huawei’s latest iPhone rival a few months ago, warning that all Huawei equipment might pose security threats."

    It always comes back to the close links of Huawei to the Chinese Government.

    Okay I'm done making the same arguments over and over again, and you being unable to understand what National Security entails.

Sign In or Register to comment.