Hands on: Swagtron's iPhone-enabled SwagCycle Pro scooter

Posted:
in iPhone
We've been exploring portable, iPhone-connected electric vehicles lately, and the next one we're putting on our local roads is Swagtron's SwagCycle Pro.

SwagCycle Pro


If you know the Swagtron name, it's probably because of their hoverboards. They capitalized on the initial fad, and they still sell many different models -- you can even take some offroad.

They also have scooters, skateboards, and electric bikes though, and in recent times they've made a stronger effort at being a serious option for commuters. Enter the SwagCycle Pro, intended for short trips or that "last mile" after getting off a bus or train.

While it resembles a compact bike, make no mistake -- it's really a scooter. There are no pedals, so if you run out of power, you'll be walking it home. That means it also has a relatively short range, between 12.4 and 15.5 miles.

Assuming you go slow and don't run into any hills, that is. After using the SwagCycle II app to adjust the max speed to 18mph, we ran out of power in just a few miles -- for full distance, you'll need to leave the throttle capped at 10mph, which is slower than the 15mph of Segway and Xiaomi scooters used by companies like Bird and Lime.

SwagCycle II app


There's a lot to like about the Pro nevertheless. Its controls are as intuitive as you could want, and the foldable stock works beautifully while still feeling rock-solid. The design of the iOS app is a little retro, but has all the essential features and can even diagnose some technical issues. No trouble so far, thankfully.

Its seat is surprisingly comfortable, too, and its fixed-length foot pegs should accommodate most heights. It's fun to ride so long as you're not self-conscious about its name or size.

Keep following AppleInsider for a full text and video review in coming weeks.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,570administrator
    If you can't see your comment, re-read the commenting guidelines for the reason why.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    JinTechJinTech Posts: 356member
    This looks like it would be fun for what would normally be my 30 minute walk to work. I don't mind the walk but sometimes I just feel like getting there a little quicker than usual.
    cornchip
  • Reply 3 of 7
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,311member
    I'm only 4mi from work. but with a couple steep hills. with a "12"mi range I think that might get me there & back tho. However, a lot cheaper to use the bike I already have. And I'd be in better physical shape...
  • Reply 4 of 7
    NY1822NY1822 Posts: 598member
    At what point do you think toiletries will adopt the "Pro" name? Can't be far off at this point.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 7,569member

    Assuming you go slow and don't run into any hills, that is. After using the SwagCycle II app to adjust the max speed to 18mph, we ran out of power in just a few miles -- for full distance, you'll need to leave the throttle capped at 10mph, which is slower than the 15mph of Segway and Xiaomi scooters used by companies like Bird and Lime.
    Anything to avoid peddling, I guess. But a bike get you there faster, goes further, and never needs recharging or responsible waste disposal. 
    cornchipchasm
  • Reply 6 of 7
    Eric_WVGGEric_WVGG Posts: 603member
    daaang those things are inexpensive though
  • Reply 7 of 7
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,517member
    Yes, oddly not mentioned in the article is the price: US$400.

    I'm semi-interested in this whole "micromobility" fad (and trust me, this too is a fad outside the third world) so I much appreciate the article. The bike looks nice but the lack of actual pedals for when you run out of juice (and you will) is kind of a deal-killer for me. I want to be able to use something like this as a bike-bike when I want and as an electric when I'm being lazy :). So I guess I'll keep looking.
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