Apple investigating iPhone 6 explosion in California

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 47
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,258member
    nht said:
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    He’s hyper-critical of apple so any reasoned response is not to be expected.
    🤣
  • Reply 22 of 47
    I have an iPhone 6 that had a bulging battery. Because it was allegeable for the battery replacement for $29 in 2018, I was able to replace the battery and it works like new!
  • Reply 23 of 47
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,702member
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    It is -- but since there is ZERO evidence that this battery was damaged why would you make such a claim?
    Nor is there any evdence for any of your other claims.
    Let's stick to reality.
    I wasn't claiming anything, simply going through a list of likely possibilities given the circumstances which you promptly dismissed out of hand.
    FileMakerFellercornchipStrangeDays
  • Reply 24 of 47
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,702member

    “Apple advised to Adata there could be a few factors that could cause overheating, such as the use of unauthorized charging cables and chargers”

    How are consumers supposed to know if the cables or chargers are “unauthorized”?  I’ve bought 1/2 a dozen chargers, and 20+ cables on Amazon in the last decade for my iPhone and IPad.  

    No one intentionally buys an “unauthorized” cable/charger...  

    Does Apple actively police what’s being sold?  I assume they collect money to authorize accessories, part of that money should go to enforcement, otherwise no one is going to pay it.

    AI could ask.  If Apple doesn’t, their response is lawyer speak BS.  If they do, that would be useful and relevant info...
    No, no one intentionally buys an 'unauthorized' charger, but what they do is look and say "well, it's looks the same and it has a USB jack on one side and a 2 prong plug on the other, so it must be the same, even though it's only $1.99 at a gas station. As mentioned above, Apple has the MFI program which gives some indication of quality.

    What people buy and plug into their phones is completely out of Apple's (or any other manufacturer's) control. The best they can do is ship a proper charger and cable with the device and advise them to stick to 'certified' components. Unfortunately, that frequently comes across as 'buy only [Apple/Samsung/LG] chargers and cables' which people interpret as the manufacturer simply trying to drum up accessory business. Regardless, if the device is damaged by a faulty charger, the fault lies with the charger manufacturer, not Apple.
  • Reply 25 of 47
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    Damaged? No. Old. That’s all. Abused how? Leaving the device plugged in all day? That’s not abuse. 
    chemengin1muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 26 of 47
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    nht said:
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    He’s hyper-critical of apple so any reasoned response is not to be expected.
    LOL... No,  I didn't criticize Apple at all.   But neither do I make irrational excuses for them. 
     I was responding to the claim (and others) that the battery was defective because it was in an iPhone 6.   That's beyond nonsense, it's stupid.  

    But because you're a China hater, you attack me because I call out Trump's irrational, harmful trade wars for the stupidity that they are.  Go take your meds.   You must have forgotten them.


    “Meds” don’t fix irrational behavior or beliefs.
    chemengin1muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 27 of 47
    dr. xdr. x Posts: 278member
    I noticed a lot of kids (sometimes, even adults) love to charge while still using (e.g. playing PUBG while charging). Often, I notice the iPhones/iPads run rather hot (warmer than usual) when they do so. Is this not another potential higher risk factor that so many people are ignoring until some serious incident happens?
    I haven't come across any advisories or instructions from Apple that suggest avoiding charging while using iPhones.
    if you go to support.apple.com and scroll to the bottom. It is right above Gift Card scams. It says:

    Beware of counterfeit parts

    Some counterfeit and third party power adapters and batteries may not be designed properly and could result in safety issues. To ensure you receive a genuine Apple battery during a battery replacement, we recommend visiting an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider. If you need a replacement adapter to charge your Apple device, we recommend getting an Apple power adapter.

    Also non-genuine replacement displays may have compromised visual quality and may fail to work correctly. Apple-certified screen repairs are performed by trusted experts who use genuine Apple parts.

    Hope this helps.
  • Reply 28 of 47
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    It is -- but since there is ZERO evidence that this battery was damaged why would you make such a claim?
    Nor is there any evdence for any of your other claims.
    Let's stick to reality.
    I wasn't claiming anything, simply going through a list of likely possibilities given the circumstances which you promptly dismissed out of hand.
    Sorry, I didn't read it that way.   Perhaps I should have read it a second time before jumping on it.
  • Reply 29 of 47
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,258member
    dysamoria said:
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    Damaged? No. Old. That’s all. Abused how? Leaving the device plugged in all day? That’s not abuse. 
    Okay.  So I guess we shouldn’t think defectives could happen?  Do you know what exactly is going on?
    edited July 2019 StrangeDays
  • Reply 30 of 47
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,258member
    dysamoria said:
    nht said:
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    He’s hyper-critical of apple so any reasoned response is not to be expected.
    LOL... No,  I didn't criticize Apple at all.   But neither do I make irrational excuses for them. 
     I was responding to the claim (and others) that the battery was defective because it was in an iPhone 6.   That's beyond nonsense, it's stupid.  

    But because you're a China hater, you attack me because I call out Trump's irrational, harmful trade wars for the stupidity that they are.  Go take your meds.   You must have forgotten them.


    “Meds” don’t fix irrational behavior or beliefs.
    That statement works better on the guy you’re replying to.
    bestkeptsecret
  • Reply 31 of 47
    It's always best to wait for the facts -- which is what Apple is doing.
    And then, once it is determined, educate the public on how and why they should avoid that practice.
    Well said, although I fear you didn't apply this when making your earlier comment about the proffered possible causes for a battery fire.

    And you'd be hard-pressed to find a comments thread that doesn't contain a reasonable amount of idle speculation. As Rands says, in the absence of hard information, humans make up their own story - and it's always one where their worst fears come true.
  • Reply 32 of 47
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,179member
    Could Apple have designed a connector that wouldn't allow third party charging devices (via the Lightning port) to work, perhaps using some sort of digital signature sent from the cable/charger to the phone? If yes, why hasn't Apple done that? Is it possible Apple wanted third party charges to be available to consumers?
  • Reply 33 of 47
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 820member
    Especially with younger people I spot a lot of phones stored in hip pockets. Sit on a phone a few times and bad things can occur with these Li batteries....
  • Reply 34 of 47
    Could Apple have designed a connector that wouldn't allow third party charging devices (via the Lightning port) to work, perhaps using some sort of digital signature sent from the cable/charger to the phone? If yes, why hasn't Apple done that? Is it possible Apple wanted third party charges to be available to consumers?

    Well, that would make them a target for a lot of lawsuits and probably some investigations from 3 lettered agencies.
  • Reply 35 of 47
    ivanhivanh Posts: 597member
    Sooner or later, all iPhones with non-detachable batteries will catch on fire. That’s why I wrote to Apple years ago their designs (NDB) had safety and security faults. 
  • Reply 36 of 47
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,916member
    jcs2305 said:
    “Apple advised to Adata there could be a few factors that could cause overheating, such as the use of unauthorized charging cables and chargers”

    How are consumers supposed to know if the cables or chargers are “unauthorized”?  I’ve bought 1/2 a dozen chargers, and 20+ cables on Amazon in the last decade for my iPhone and IPad.  

    No one intentionally buys an “unauthorized” cable/charger...  

    Does Apple actively police what’s being sold?  I assume they collect money to authorize accessories, part of that money should go to enforcement, otherwise no one is going to pay it.

    AI could ask.  If Apple doesn’t, their response is lawyer speak BS.  If they do, that would be useful and relevant info...
    Any aftermarket cable or accessory  that is safe to use clearly has MFI on the box it comes in. I have used MFI cables in my car and my bedside for years without issue. 

    https://paracable.com/pages/what-is-apple-mfi-certification

    https://mfi.apple.com/MFiWeb/getAPS


    Here is some helpful info from Apple to help identify inferior knock off cables and accessories that may be unsafe for use. 

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204566



    Someone did a really great comparison of the internals of Apple vs. Knockoff power bricks a couple years ago. Worth a DuckDuck search if you're into that kind of stuff.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 37 of 47
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    Could Apple have designed a connector that wouldn't allow third party charging devices (via the Lightning port) to work, perhaps using some sort of digital signature sent from the cable/charger to the phone? If yes, why hasn't Apple done that? Is it possible Apple wanted third party charges to be available to consumers?
    The phone will warn you if you’re using an unauthorised cable, but it won’t stop you from using it. 
  • Reply 38 of 47
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,257member
    ivanh said:
    Sooner or later, all iPhones with non-detachable batteries will catch on fire. That’s why I wrote to Apple years ago their designs (NDB) had safety and security faults. 
    Did they thank you for your invaluable wisdom and offer you a job heading up the department? No? I’m shocked...
  • Reply 39 of 47
    ralphieralphie Posts: 73member
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
    The iPhone 6 is an old model - first released in 2014 and sales stopped in 2016, so the phone is almost 3 years old at a minimum. The article doesn’t say exactly how old the phone was, but from the description, I would suspect that it was a hand-me-down device the kids were using to play games and watch videos. If this is the case, the battery was likely pretty old and may have been ‘abused’ somewhat. I’ve seen plenty of devices for which the battery is dead and kids just leave them plugged in constantly.

    iPhone fires are quite unusual so it makes me wonder if there was other damage and/or a defective charger being used - both of these could lead to the battery overheating. GIven the age, it’s also possible that it had a defective replacement battery installed. Even considering this, though, you never want to have a device explode like this.
    NONE of that is any excuse for a fire.   NONE.   ZERO.
    How is a damaged battery not a reasonable explanation for a fire?
    Who said it was damaged. You’re jumping to conclusions in your support of Apple.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 40 of 47
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,257member
    cornchip said:
    jcs2305 said:
    “Apple advised to Adata there could be a few factors that could cause overheating, such as the use of unauthorized charging cables and chargers”

    How are consumers supposed to know if the cables or chargers are “unauthorized”?  I’ve bought 1/2 a dozen chargers, and 20+ cables on Amazon in the last decade for my iPhone and IPad.  

    No one intentionally buys an “unauthorized” cable/charger...  

    Does Apple actively police what’s being sold?  I assume they collect money to authorize accessories, part of that money should go to enforcement, otherwise no one is going to pay it.

    AI could ask.  If Apple doesn’t, their response is lawyer speak BS.  If they do, that would be useful and relevant info...
    Any aftermarket cable or accessory  that is safe to use clearly has MFI on the box it comes in. I have used MFI cables in my car and my bedside for years without issue. 

    https://paracable.com/pages/what-is-apple-mfi-certification

    https://mfi.apple.com/MFiWeb/getAPS


    Here is some helpful info from Apple to help identify inferior knock off cables and accessories that may be unsafe for use. 

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204566



    Someone did a really great comparison of the internals of Apple vs. Knockoff power bricks a couple years ago. Worth a DuckDuck search if you're into that kind of stuff.
    I believe it’s these:

    http://www.righto.com/2012/05/apple-iphone-charger-teardown-quality.html

    http://www.righto.com/2016/03/counterfeit-macbook-charger-teardown.html

    http://www.righto.com/2014/05/a-look-inside-ipad-chargers-pricey.html
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