Apple Maps vs Google Maps - smartphone mapping titans battle it out in 2020

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 67
    When I’m behind the wheel it’s all about Waze. 
  • Reply 42 of 67
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,901member
    genovelle said:
    I was just thinking of how anytime an Apple competitor like Google enters a space Apple is in, they get the benefit of being new. Apple took an enormous amount of flack for the release of maps not being perfect, even though Google had a 7 year lead that leveraged Apple’s platform to become viable in mobile. 
    True - and there tends to be inherent bias in the criticism, but on the flip side, when Apple entered the market, Google maps was already quite developed and had become the standard. Competing with Google was a tall order by any measure, but by all accounts Apple was not up to that standard. While you may cut them some slack for being new, at the end of the day the mapping app needs to do its job and Apple’s app quite frequently did not. Thankfully that has changed and it is now quite competent.
    MacPro said:
    When Apple Maps can have waypoints on a route being panned for long distance driving it will be far more useful , if it already can I would love to know how.
    Yes, yes, Yes!

    edited February 2020
  • Reply 43 of 67
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,901member
    I use Apple Maps almost exclusively - partly because it’s the default in iOS, but partly because I like it and it works for me. I agree with the article on the interface. It’s cleaner and easier to use than Google’s. 

    Google is still better - they have more businesses, points of interest, etc, and a far bigger street view database which can be incredibly helpful. I took a look at ‘look around’ and it looks really nice - smoother and easier to navigate than street view and easier to activate too. I just hope they hurry up and expand the database!

    It doesn’t happen all that often but I can definitely say there are more occasions where Apple doesn’t have a location or has it wrong than google. The problem is you dont’ know that until you get there, which can be quite frustrating. Fortunately this is quite rare anymore.

    One thing I’m quite impressed by is how accurate Apple Maps’ ETA is - I drove from Minneapolis to Madison (4 ½ hrs) and it was within 5 minutes. Does anyone know if it learns your driving style? I typically drive a bit (<5 MPH) over the speed limit so if were to drive the speed limit I would arrive later than the estimate. I’m never sure if I’m just driving the average speed that Apple uses for the estimate or if it’s learned from my history.
    edited February 2020 cornchip
  • Reply 44 of 67
    Offline maps on Apple Maps works just fine. No idea why people say it doesn’t.


    cornchip
  • Reply 45 of 67
    Thanks for all the work that went into this very detailed comparison between Apple and Google map apps. As a follow-up, it would be great if you could compare the abilities of Apple, Google and Waze map apps to determine which one is best for routing you most quickly through real-time traffic. For anyone who drives in an urban or suburban area where heavy traffic is a constant, there is no map app feature that's more important--or that can have a bigger impact on your life in terms of time saved--than the ability to route you most efficiently through traffic. Even though I'm all in on Apple, I continue to use Waze as my default because it still seems best at assessing traffic in real time--but I'd be very interested in seeing my impressions put to a real test. 
  • Reply 46 of 67
    I type a street in my city:
    Apple Maps: gives me a choice from different cities and even countries. Very dumb. 
    Google Maps: gives me the street from my city as the first choice. Nice. 
    montrosemacsphilboogie
  • Reply 47 of 67
    'Had a frustrating travel experience - perhaps for lack of familiarity with features - on both platforms recently.  Rented a U-Haul truck (i.e. a vehicle that cannot be driven on many parkways or roads with low overpass heights) for a relocation and could not easily find a way to use either platform to limit directions to roads I could legally use.  I also had trouble finding how to exclude directions that involved ferries.  Any reader have enough experience with the settings I could not find to address these? 
  • Reply 48 of 67
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    gatorguy said:
    "Google does not sell personal information..." 
    "Google uses differential privacy to prevent advertisers from learning about you..."
    "settings can be changed by the user to limit data collection..."
    "a new incognito mode for Google Maps exists."

    Love seeing the AI editor clarifying this for those who still seem so confused by it here on AppleInsider. Get out ahead of some who incessantly post misinformation and outright FUD. Well done. 

    Now everyone get back to using the map service you find most useful or convenient whether from Apple or Google or TomTom or ... :)
    You've missed the point, GoogleGuy

    We're well aware of what they say they do.

    The concern is what they're actually doing.

    Little tricks like ignoring user preferences to extract data from Safari don't inspire trust.

    And that's not even considering when they mess up and hand over your photos to people you don't know.

    You feel different; that's your business.

    edited February 2020 cornchippscooter63GeorgeBMacmontrosemacsStrangeDays
  • Reply 49 of 67
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,943member
    Google maps is still better, shows stores and restaurants along with reviews like yelp. Much better than apple. 
    If you notice a business or POI not in AM... just add it. it takes under a minute and will be added in under a week.

    There is nothing Google could possibly do to get me to use their app.

    dws-2 said:
    I'm glad that Apple is improving, and I think some day they might get there, but every time I try using Apple Maps, something is wrong. The store is about half a block away on a good trip, several miles away on a bad trip. I would vastly prefer to use Apple Maps for the privacy, and I could live with the lower detail and a couple months out of date information, but it leads me to the wrong place way too often, even a couple years after the restaurant or business opened. This is in Minneapolis, MN, which would seem to be a big enough city to have some accuracy.

    Report it. it takes like 22 seconds.


    edited February 2020
  • Reply 50 of 67
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,102member
    Rayz2016 said:
    gatorguy said:
    "Google does not sell personal information..." 
    "Google uses differential privacy to prevent advertisers from learning about you..."
    "settings can be changed by the user to limit data collection..."
    "a new incognito mode for Google Maps exists."

    Love seeing the AI editor clarifying this for those who still seem so confused by it here on AppleInsider. Get out ahead of some who incessantly post misinformation and outright FUD. Well done. 

    Now everyone get back to using the map service you find most useful or convenient whether from Apple or Google or TomTom or ... :)
    You've missed the point, GoogleGuy

    We're well aware of what they say they do.

    The concern is what they're actually doing.

    Little tricks like ignoring user preferences to extract data from Safari don't inspire trust.

    Oh, that thing about a decade ago? Gotcha.
    BTW, pretty sure that's a failed effort since everyone ignores it. "Do Not Track" was always a voluntary thing. Even Apple stopped honoring it and removed it as a user option in Safari altogether last year. Google was fined for improperly advising Safari users they didn't need to do anything else to "opt out", not for ad tracking. Still it was a bad Google moment.

    But yeah, wave that flag, no one ever changes.... ;)

    edited February 2020
  • Reply 51 of 67
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 1,336member
    dws-2 said:
    I'm glad that Apple is improving, and I think some day they might get there, but every time I try using Apple Maps, something is wrong. The store is about half a block away on a good trip, several miles away on a bad trip. I would vastly prefer to use Apple Maps for the privacy, and I could live with the lower detail and a couple months out of date information, but it leads me to the wrong place way too often, even a couple years after the restaurant or business opened. This is in Minneapolis, MN, which would seem to be a big enough city to have some accuracy.

    This is how I feel about Google maps in my area. We out just yesterday morning looking for a little care dealership that had recently moved. Google maps was connected the listing as default for directions so we used it. It was her iPhone as well as I don't have GM installed on my device. We ended up on a different street at a private residence? she tried to just search by name of the car lot and no results were coming back and the address provided was not the residence that GM was taking us too.

    I stopped the care and searched by name on my phone using AM.. we made it to the place in a couple of mins without issue. 

    In the past I have had issues like this using AM in my area, and Google was able to get me sorted out, This isn't the case so much anymore at least for me and places I am trying to get to. I am in Pennsylvania just for reference..
    cornchip
  • Reply 52 of 67
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,673member
    Eric_WVGG said:
    This article is overlooking some very serious issues with hardware lock-in.

    If you want maps or directions on your Apple Watch or AirPods, it has to be Apple Maps. These use private APIs in a way that is arguably anticompetitive. 

    Meanwhile, if you want directions for bicycling that won’t get you killed, you’re stuck with Google Maps. Apple will either send you the wrong way up one-way streets if you pretend to be a pedestrian, or up freeways if you pretend to be a car. 

    Umm. Wrong.

    First of all, the API's are not private. MapKit and CoreLocation are available to all developers across all Apple's devices. Any mapping service is free to create their own maps app for all of Apple's devices as well... they do not have to use MapKit.

    Second, any hardware maker is free to decide what they want their device to do and use any OS, software, services that's available. They do not have to allow features to be user configurable. People have choices... You don't like the way Apple runs iOS, don't buy an iPhone or Apple Watch, or AirPods. There are many other products in those device categories.

    And seriously, get off this anticompetitive wagon - it's getting old - and completely bent out of shape (it's the new "monopoly"). You obviously have no idea what it actually means. It has nothing to do with using proprietary technology. There is nothing illegal or anticompetitive for a company to use proprietary technology in their products.... Apple's SoC's are only used in Apple devices. Apple devices only run iOS. iOS only uses Apple Maps for built-in functions, just as it only uses Siri for built-in voice assistance. These are all technologies used by Apple to create Apple products. Products that compete fairly with other products on the market. Having a device with a feature that a competitor doesn't have, or a feature that works better is called, "competitive advantage" it's how companies compete with each other. 
    montrosemacsNotsofastcornchip
  • Reply 53 of 67
    Eric_WVGG said:
    This article is overlooking some very serious issues with hardware lock-in.

    If you want maps or directions on your Apple Watch or AirPods, it has to be Apple Maps. These use private APIs in a way that is arguably anticompetitive. 

    Meanwhile, if you want directions for bicycling that won’t get you killed, you’re stuck with Google Maps. Apple will either send you the wrong way up one-way streets if you pretend to be a pedestrian, or up freeways if you pretend to be a car. 
    Not sure about this... Google used to provide this on the Apple Watch and they chose to remove support...  and if you have an iPhone why wouldn’t you want an Apple Watch? If you have an android get one of the 321 watch options (or the 8 left that are actually supported).  Not buying the “Hardware lock-In” really... at least not as a serious issue anyway. 
    I'm unclear on what you're suggesting here… that I bail on iPhone and the many services I rely on so I can have a Watch that works with Google Maps? Or convince them to bring back their Watch app? Even if they did, Watch API limitations would make it a "second-class citizen."
  • Reply 54 of 67
    I use both apps in the U.K. I prefer to use Apple Maps for navigation and used it last week for a journey of about an hour and 40 minutes. I arrived within about 2 minutes of the predicted time of arrival when I set off. I have never had a problem using Apple Maps in the U.K. The only reason I keep Google Maps on my phone is for street view. If Apple can roll out its version to cover most of the U.K. I will delete Google Maps from my phone. 
  • Reply 55 of 67
    gatorguy said:
    "Google does not sell personal information..." 
    "Google uses differential privacy to prevent advertisers from learning about you..."
    "settings can be changed by the user to limit data collection..."
    "a new incognito mode for Google Maps exists."

    Love seeing the AI editor clarifying this for those who still seem so confused by it here on AppleInsider. Get out ahead of some who incessantly post misinformation and outright FUD. Well done. 

    Now everyone get back to using the map service you find most useful or convenient whether from Apple or Google or TomTom or ... :)
    You miss the point.  Choosing to use Google Maps is a disaster for anyone who values their privacy or their family's.  Google harvests the data that shows everywhere you and your family go, where you stop, for how long, etc., and then LINKS that data via what they call your "universal identifier" number that is the most dangerous digital dossier in the world that they control. For advertising and whatever other purpose Google decides, your Google Maps data is linked to the contents of every email sent or received if you use Gmail, every photo you upload to their photo cloud, every document you put on Google docs, every website you've ever visited, every click you've ever made on the web, (even if you don't use Android, but don't use a tracker blocker on), every search you've ever made if you use Google, all your contacts, etc., etc.   Read your TOS, they retain the worldwide rights in perpetuity to your photos, etc., and retain the right to sell all that data to a third party or transfer to a successor company, etc.   Of course, that virtual dossier is available to hackers, intel agencies, law enforcement with subpoena, etc., etc.


    cornchip
  • Reply 56 of 67
    crosslad said:
    I use both apps in the U.K. I prefer to use Apple Maps for navigation and used it last week for a journey of about an hour and 40 minutes. I arrived within about 2 minutes of the predicted time of arrival when I set off. I have never had a problem using Apple Maps in the U.K. The only reason I keep Google Maps on my phone is for street view. If Apple can roll out its version to cover most of the U.K. I will delete Google Maps from my phone. 
    Well good days are a coming for you.  Apple's Look Around blows Street View out of the water. Street View has always been clunky and a pain to navigate around.  Look Around is incredibly smooth and makes Street View look and feel primitive in comparison.
  • Reply 57 of 67
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,282member
    big kc said:
    They're both good. It pretty much comes down to personal preference nowadays. But a lot of people have only ever used one or the other, and don't really have a preference, never having tried the other. Everybody should try them both and figure out which works better for their own purposes. I do prefer the way Apple displays maps & directions via CarPlay over Google's. Street names are much larger and plainly displayed, making them easy to read at a quick glance. Google's labels are smaller and fussier. And what about Waze? Tons of people absolutely fawn over it and refuse to use anything else. It does have a few nice unique features - like being able to flag an incident or lurking speed trap. But visually it's ugly and a mess and always has been.
    I used Waze when navigating around congested Boston traffic and I thought that it was quite useful in that particular scenario because there was a lot of realtime crowd sourcing flagging traffic issues. Outside of that specific scenario Waze has nothing more to offer than the other map contenders. As an aside, I wonder who exactly is entering information into Waze on their phone in these situations. I hope it's not people who are also trying to drive their cars.
  • Reply 58 of 67
    All these whiz bang features and neither app can yet show you what street you're actually on or orient the map before you actually start driving. Out of the two I've preferred Google, though Apple's integration with Siri means I use it more than I'd like. My biggest beef with Apple Maps (other than aforementioned), is that I get it all setup just right with my zoom and then the map decides to auto reorient to default five seconds later. Good grief.
    edited February 2020 jingo
  • Reply 59 of 67
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,102member
    Notsofast said:
    gatorguy said:
    "Google does not sell personal information..." 
    "Google uses differential privacy to prevent advertisers from learning about you..."
    "settings can be changed by the user to limit data collection..."
    "a new incognito mode for Google Maps exists."

    Love seeing the AI editor clarifying this for those who still seem so confused by it here on AppleInsider. Get out ahead of some who incessantly post misinformation and outright FUD. Well done. 

    Now everyone get back to using the map service you find most useful or convenient whether from Apple or Google or TomTom or ... :)
    For advertising and whatever other purpose Google decides, your Google Maps data is linked to the contents of every email sent or received if you use Gmail, every photo you upload to their photo cloud, every document you put on Google docs, every website you've ever visited, every click you've ever made on the web, (even if you don't use Android, but don't use a tracker blocker on), every search you've ever made if you use Google, all your contacts, etc., etc.   Read your TOS, they retain the worldwide rights in perpetuity to your photos, etc., and retain the right to sell all that data to a third party or transfer to a successor company, etc.   Of course, that virtual dossier is available to hackers, intel agencies, law enforcement with subpoena, etc., etc.


    What are you talking about and where are you getting your information about Google owning your photos (in general the same disclaimers as Apple Photos) Google selling all that data to a third party (Apple says the same thing) Apple third party transfers), tracking your emails, and stealing data from your Google Docs for their own ads? You wouldn't be making up stuff would you? 

    By the way, read Apple's TOS. Just like Google they advise you that by using Apple services you agree that they have the right to transfer your data to another party should the company change ownership. Should you worry about it happening in your lifetime? Probably as much as worrying about it happening to Google. 
    edited February 2020 philboogie
  • Reply 60 of 67
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,927member
    bala1234 said:
    Eric_WVGG said:
    This article is overlooking some very serious issues with hardware lock-in.

    If you want maps or directions on your Apple Watch or AirPods, it has to be Apple Maps. These use private APIs in a way that is arguably anticompetitive. 

    Meanwhile, if you want directions for bicycling that won’t get you killed, you’re stuck with Google Maps. Apple will either send you the wrong way up one-way streets if you pretend to be a pedestrian, or up freeways if you pretend to be a car. 
    Re, hardware lock-in, FTA: "Apple users can choose either. Android users are effectively stuck with Google Maps. "

    That while true is mildly disingenuous. The reason android users are stuck with Google Maps is because apple doesn't (yet?) offer their product on Android. Not due to any action by Google.
    The reason is irrelevant. It’s disingenuous for Google to pretend to support other platforms with second rate product ports.
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