ARM Macs in 2021, iOS 13.4 Beta, 'AirPods X', Mac Pro news and more on the AppleInsider Po...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 2020
Andrew O'Hara joins Stephen Robles discussing the possible move to ARM-based Macs in 2021, upcoming changes in iOS 13.4, Mac Pro white papers and user-installable wheel kit, Target's leaked photo of "AirPods X," Rian Johnson on iPhones in movies, and more.

MacBook Air, a likely candidate for an ARM processor
MacBook Air, a likely candidate for an ARM processor


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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    rain22rain22 Posts: 132member
    It will be the Start of the end of the Mac. 
    Apple’s desktop track record of late has been concerning

    Mac OS already greatly suffers from neglect with major bugs still not fixed since Tim took over - and the little cool things that used to make life easier all but gone with Little attention to detail.
    Zero new software or meaningful updates to the iWork suite since Tim took over as well. I guess it was to be expected when you rip all your top engineers away to focus on mobile. 

    The moto - Intel switch and Rosetta was a nightmare for anyone who had to live through it - with the Only saving grace being we could run Windows and compatible software while we waited for developers to write new code - many not even bothering. 

    I don’t see the draw to running Fischer-Price mobile versions of apps on our desktops - and already inefficient neglected versions of Mac software through a VM container... (hello Adobe CC).

    Of course they won’t switch Pro over right away - but you can guess how much Love the pro OS will get with the talent pool and resources being diluted even more. 

    A business would be putting all their eggs in one basket and 100% reliable on the whims of Apple - which isn’t a wise business strategy. 

    After the Enterprise Mac Pro debacle - a shift to ARM would strongly indicate it’s time for the remaining pros to tap out. I don’t see a lot of devs rushing in on an ever decreasing market when Apple isn’t even bothering to invest the time. 
  • Reply 2 of 4
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,259administrator
    rain22 said:
    It will be the Start of the end of the Mac. 
    Apple’s desktop track record of late has been concerning

    Mac OS already greatly suffers from neglect with major bugs still not fixed since Tim took over - and the little cool things that used to make life easier all but gone with Little attention to detail.
    Zero new software or meaningful updates to the iWork suite since Tim took over as well. I guess it was to be expected when you rip all your top engineers away to focus on mobile. 

    The moto - Intel switch and Rosetta was a nightmare for anyone who had to live through it - with the Only saving grace being we could run Windows and compatible software while we waited for developers to write new code - many not even bothering. 

    I don’t see the draw to running Fischer-Price mobile versions of apps on our desktops - and already inefficient neglected versions of Mac software through a VM container... (hello Adobe CC).

    Of course they won’t switch Pro over right away - but you can guess how much Love the pro OS will get with the talent pool and resources being diluted even more. 

    A business would be putting all their eggs in one basket and 100% reliable on the whims of Apple - which isn’t a wise business strategy. 

    After the Enterprise Mac Pro debacle - a shift to ARM would strongly indicate it’s time for the remaining pros to tap out. I don’t see a lot of devs rushing in on an ever decreasing market when Apple isn’t even bothering to invest the time. 
    Most of the AI staff lived through both the 68K to PPC and PPC to Intel shift. Neither were "nightmares" even close to universally -- but I will admit to the fact that there were some teething pains.

    In regards to the second bolded paragraph, this isn't about you. This is about the iPhone driving the Mac sales. It hasn't been the other way around in five years or more, and probably ten. And, regarding "devs rushing in on an ever decreasing market" -- do you think that Apple hasn't consulted the higher-ups at their enterprise partners like IBM and Deloitte about it?

    The shift to Intel, and the shift to PPC before it were heralded by some as "the start of the end of the Mac." Yet, here we are.
    edited February 2020
  • Reply 3 of 4
    stephenroblesstephenrobles Posts: 90member, moderator, editor
    rain22 said:
    It will be the Start of the end of the Mac. 
    Apple’s desktop track record of late has been concerning

    Mac OS already greatly suffers from neglect with major bugs still not fixed since Tim took over - and the little cool things that used to make life easier all but gone with Little attention to detail.
    Zero new software or meaningful updates to the iWork suite since Tim took over as well. I guess it was to be expected when you rip all your top engineers away to focus on mobile. 

    The moto - Intel switch and Rosetta was a nightmare for anyone who had to live through it - with the Only saving grace being we could run Windows and compatible software while we waited for developers to write new code - many not even bothering. 

    I don’t see the draw to running Fischer-Price mobile versions of apps on our desktops - and already inefficient neglected versions of Mac software through a VM container... (hello Adobe CC).

    Of course they won’t switch Pro over right away - but you can guess how much Love the pro OS will get with the talent pool and resources being diluted even more. 

    A business would be putting all their eggs in one basket and 100% reliable on the whims of Apple - which isn’t a wise business strategy. 

    After the Enterprise Mac Pro debacle - a shift to ARM would strongly indicate it’s time for the remaining pros to tap out. I don’t see a lot of devs rushing in on an ever decreasing market when Apple isn’t even bothering to invest the time. 
    While it’s super early days, you have some legitimate oncerns. What would give me some hope are good Catalyst apps on the Mac, even first party ones. The TV, Podcast and Music apps should be the best examples of quality but they’re still awkward and buggy. 

    The OS updates this year during WWDC will be telling. I’m hoping for another bug fix / making iOS and MacOS super reliable again. 
  • Reply 4 of 4
    rain22 said:
    It will be the Start of the end of the Mac. 
    Apple’s desktop track record of late has been concerning

    Mac OS already greatly suffers from neglect with major bugs still not fixed since Tim took over - and the little cool things that used to make life easier all but gone with Little attention to detail.
    Zero new software or meaningful updates to the iWork suite since Tim took over as well. I guess it was to be expected when you rip all your top engineers away to focus on mobile. 

    The moto - Intel switch and Rosetta was a nightmare for anyone who had to live through it - with the Only saving grace being we could run Windows and compatible software while we waited for developers to write new code - many not even bothering. 

    I don’t see the draw to running Fischer-Price mobile versions of apps on our desktops - and already inefficient neglected versions of Mac software through a VM container... (hello Adobe CC).

    Of course they won’t switch Pro over right away - but you can guess how much Love the pro OS will get with the talent pool and resources being diluted even more. 

    A business would be putting all their eggs in one basket and 100% reliable on the whims of Apple - which isn’t a wise business strategy. 

    After the Enterprise Mac Pro debacle - a shift to ARM would strongly indicate it’s time for the remaining pros to tap out. I don’t see a lot of devs rushing in on an ever decreasing market when Apple isn’t even bothering to invest the time. 
    It will be the start of the end of x86 on the Mac
    stephenrobles
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