The A13 chip in Apple's cheapest iPhone SE beats the most expensive Androids

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in iPhone
Several years ago, Apple's best chips began decisively beating the performance of the best chips available to high-end Android phones. Now, even Apple's $399 iPhone SE uses a more powerful brain than even the most advanced Android flagships with prices above $1,000. How is this possible?

Apple A13 Bionic
Apple's A13 Bionic isn't just faster, it's deployed wider than any high-end Android chip


"Apple is using the A13 Bionic in the 2020 edition of the iPhone SE and it outperforms the Snapdragon 865 in almost every way," noted Android Central blogger Jerry Hildenbrand. "That's a big deal for a number of reasons," he added.

Apple's A13 Bionic vs Qualcomm's Snapdragon 865

"The A13 is a stronger chip than the Snapdragon 865 for daily use in every category," Hildenbrand noted, linking to the details of Qualcomm's introduction of its Snapdragon 865 as its best chip for premium Androids this year.

Like Apple's A13 Bionic, Qualcomm's Snapdragon 865 is a 7nm component that bundles an ARM CPU, mobile GPU, an NSP for machine learning, an ISP for camera logic, and a variety of other audio, video, and security engines together into a single SoC or "System on a Chip."

Yet despite all of Qualcomm's efforts, the Snapdragon 865 continues to fall behind Apple's best chip in basic CPU and GPU processing power. That has focused Qualcomm's marketing on promoting its support for 5G mobile networking instead, allowing it to advertise that at least in one respect, it is faster.

However, 2020 is turning out to be a bad year to be pushing 5G as your only strength. It will be some time before 5G becomes broadly available outside of a few leading markets such as South Korea and specific urban markets. For budget phone buyers, 5G offers little more than faster battery drain and often the requirement to pay extra for mobile service, whether that 5G service is consistently available and capable of delivering noticeably better, real-world mobile data speeds than the best 4G LTE or not.

Speed and longevity

On the other hand, a fast, modern mobile chip with an advanced CPU and GPU delivers two major benefits. The first is its overall performance when you use it. As Hildenbrand noted, "you'll notice how well the new iPhone SE performs when you use it."

iPhone SE


He added, "everything in a modern smartphone from web browsing to camera performance to less-used things like AR depends on the processor. You need to crunch numbers really fast if you want your phone to respond really fast. The $399 iPhone SE will be able to do these things faster than the new [$899] OnePlus 8 Pro or the [$1,000] Samsung Galaxy S20+."

A second benefit to having Apple's newly released chip in its value-priced iPhone is the assurance that Apple will continue to support it for many years-- likely as long as the iPhone 11 family using the same processor. When Apple drops support for older devices from a new release of iOS, it's often because they lack the silicon to take advantage of its latest advancements.

"When iOS 16 comes out the iPhone SE will get it on day one. We'll see the same for iOS 17, too," the Android Central piece predicted. Apple's latest iOS 13 continues to support iPhone 6s, a phone from 2015. That's ancient, particularly when considering that it's unusual for an Android to get updates for even two years, with supported devices often not getting the latest update until months after its release.

Because the new iPhone SE is expected to be officially supported by Apple in its latest iOS release for several years, the resale value for the phone will also remain much higher than basic Androids near the same price, or even higher-end Android flagships that lose their value faster and have more to lose.

Android Central concluded that Apple's advantage in silicon speed and longevity is why "it's so important that Google finds a way to build its own chips for its smartphone." But if a blogger in 2020 has figured that out, why didn't Google do the work to deliver advanced chips years ago?

Why is Apple so far ahead?

Google did undertake a relatively ambitious effort in designing part of the brain of a mobile phone. Back in 2017 it created a standalone ISP for advanced photo imaging that it used in Pixel phones. But the problem was that while the camera was probably the best feature to focus on, it wasn't the only reason motivating phone buyers.

The only Pixel phone that's sold above minimal volumes was the 2019 Pixel 3a, which dropped Google's custom camera silicon to reach its price point. Pretty clearly, advanced custom silicon is harder to deliver than a lot of observers imagine it is.

Even Android Central noted that Samsung's own attempt at developing its Exynos custom SoCs ended up in failure, despite building a campus and assembling leading talent without much of a budget holding them back. Samsung was still forced to make design concessions to minimize its cost, which resulted in poor performance that couldn't keep up with Qualcomm's, let alone Apple's.

A decade ago, Android enthusiasts predicted that Apple would have a very difficult time competing against all of the hardware makers collaborating on Android. Parallels were drawn with Windows PC makers who were able to introduce new Intel CPUs faster than Apple could get its PowerPC chip partners to deliver new upgrades. Even after Apple shifted its Macs to Intel chips in 2006, it was still often at a disadvantage in rolling out Macs with a performance edge at a competitive price.

The prediction that this would repeat in mobile devices didn't materialize, however. Instead, Apple's business of building premium mobile devices-- including iPhones with an average selling price of nearly $800 -- has proven to be far more commercially successful than any specific Android maker--or all of the Android licensees put together.

This has had a greater and far more important impact than merely making Apple profitable. It has also allowed Apple to reinvest its profits in aggressively building the most advanced mobile processors. Designing and building state-of-the-art processors is not only fantastically expensive; it's also a high-risk effort.

Developing advanced, custom silicon for devices that don't end up selling well has been a disastrous issue for a series of companies that have since exited the business of building chips for Android mobile makers, starting with Texas Instruments' OMAP and Nvidia Tegra, and continuing with Intel Atom.

The number of high-end Android phones supporting the production of advanced Qualcomm Snapdragon chips is not growing dramatically. Instead, the overall market for Android phones is retreating from iPhone-class competition and moving downmarket to the middle tier, where phones sell for around $300-$400.

This winter, Apple introduced iPhone 11 alongside a pair of ultra-premium iPhone 11 Pro models priced above $1,000. Yet rather than selling mostly older, cheaper models, Consumer Intelligence Research Partners estimated that just over a third of Apple's U.S. sales opted for the $699 iPhone 11, and nearly another third opted for the $999 and up iPhone 11 Pro.


Two thirds of Apple's iPhones sales are its best new high-end models


For over a decade, iPhone has maintained an incredible, unprecedented demand for fancy high-end products with innovative features, longevity, security, and battery life--all of which are driven by Apple's ability to deliver a steady stream of advanced new silicon every year.

Samsung has never come close to selling such a high-end mix of Android phones, and most Android makers sell an even lower-end combination of devices. The average selling price of Androids has hovered around $250 to $300 for many years. That can't fund the competitive development of the most advanced chips, particularly when that cost is outsourced to a third party seeking to maximize profits in selling advanced chips to handset licensees.

Yet Apple also has another advantage in silicon: it's not just making iPhones. Apple's first A4 chip was introduced by Steve Jobs at the introduction of iPad in 2010. It was only released for iPhone 4 later that same year when it also debuted in Apple TV.

Apple's broad use and reuse of its chips-- such as putting the A8 in its HomePod -- enables the company to wring the most value of the work it has already invested in building custom silicon for iPhone and iPad. Additionally, its confidence that it will be able to sell tens of millions of iPads and hundreds of millions of high-end iPhones each year enables the company to drive an intense pace of annual upgrades that no other chip maker or device assembler can match.

Further, following the parallel leap in reinventing the classic iPhone to deliver iPhone X as a new form factor driven by swipe gestures and Face ID rather than a Home button and Touch ID has enabled Apple to sell its product to two totally different markets: the high-end of discerning tech adopters who are willing to pay a high premium for the best phone available, and a lower tier of customers who want a basic phone at a basic price.

Over the holidays, Apple nearly satiated all the demand for expensive phones with its iPhone 11 family. It can now offer iPhone SE with the same processor and sell it to a class of users who are more concerned about price than some of the very latest features available.

Apple's previous iPhone 8 targeted the same group of basic iPhone buyers, which ranges from parents buying for their younger kids to enterprise deployments serving devices to their employees. iPhone SE effectively upgrades iPhone 8 to use an A13 chip and better lenses and cameras, while remaining differentiated from iPhone 11 and last year's iPhone XR.

LiDAR
The 2020 iPad Pro introduced LiDAR as a differentiating, modern feature advancing Augmented Reality


When iPhone 12 ships this fall, it will again offer things iPhone SE doesn't, including an expected jump to 5G support and other camera and imaging exclusives, likely including the LiDAR sensor that debuted on the latest iPad Pro. It will also jump to an even more advanced A14 SoC that further advances Apple's lead and justifies the price premium of its fanciest iPhones for buyers who are less concerned about price than features.

However, that's not the only direction Apple has been taking in its silicon advancements as it continues to expand its lead in the consumer electronics industry, as the next segment will examine.
edredqwerty52watto_cobra
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 70
    XedXed Posts: 1,675member
    It also beats most laptops in single-core performance, too.
    edited April 2020 p-dograzorpitStrangeDayscornchipqwerty52redgeminipaMacQcBeatsMacProjony0
  • Reply 2 of 70
    p-dogp-dog Posts: 120member
    And at a starting price of $399, the iPhone SE is yet again a threat to Android ASPs in their typical $250-$400 range. Many Android users are aspirational, only using their (non-flagship) Android phones because of their commodity prices. A super fast $400 iPhone can help them attain their dreams.
    edited April 2020 hodarwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 70
    KITAKITA Posts: 384member
    It's an excellent SoC and in a device at a good price.

    If you're just using your phone for calling, text, photos/video and media consumption apps, you'll likely never use this SoC to its potential. It would be nice to see it reach more of the lower priced iPad lineup where it can make more of a difference.

    Xed said:
    It also beats most laptops in single-core performance, too.
    In peak performance for specific tests, sure. When comparing to a laptop, there's a lot more than just what a peak Geekbench score (with pauses built in to prevent thermal throttling) can say.
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Reply 4 of 70
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    5G is certainly something to get burned by.
    (Antennas emitting 5G burn down worldwide because a strong MEME is correlating Corona to 5G.)
  • Reply 5 of 70

    5G offers little more than faster battery drain and often the requirement to pay extra for mobile service, whether that 5G service is consistently available and capable of delivering noticeably better, real-world mobile data speeds than the best 4G LTE or not.
    This is the part I’m curious about. Will I be able to purchase a non-5G iPhone 12? Could I get a 5G iPhone 12 but stay on a plan that won’t allow me to connect to 5G? Where I live and travel the most has not had any “real” 5G roll-out. It’s likely iPhone 12 will have other new features I’m interested in but being forced to pay for cellular service I can’t receive doesn’t make much sense. 
    minicoffeededgeckowatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 70
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    Apples prices are still too high to overcome a new wave of DIY and opensource hardware/software designs hitting the market/home.
    Industrie in the future will be totally distributed, and as such non existent.
    pscooter63lkruppwilliamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 70
    knowitall said:
    Apples prices are still too high to overcome a new wave of DIY and opensource hardware/software designs hitting the market/home.
    Industrie in the future will be totally distributed, and as such non existent.
    Aside from on tech forums I, personally, never hear people clamoring for DIY smartphones. It’s been possible to build your own computer for a long time. The majority of people I know still go out and buy a “pre-made” computer that they take home, plug in and turn on. I know a few people that build their own computers, and most of them also own a name brand computer as well.
    StrangeDaysCuJoYYCedredqwerty52redgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 70
    BeatsBeats Posts: 3,073member
    And the cheapest gold is shinier than the most expensive Fool's Gold.




    williamlondon
  • Reply 9 of 70
    GG1GG1 Posts: 483member
    KITA said:
    It's an excellent SoC and in a device at a good price.

    If you're just using your phone for calling, text, photos/video and media consumption apps, you'll likely never use this SoC to its potential. It would be nice to see it reach more of the lower priced iPad lineup where it can make more of a difference.

    Xed said:
    It also beats most laptops in single-core performance, too.
    In peak performance for specific tests, sure. When comparing to a laptop, there's a lot more than just what a peak Geekbench score (with pauses built in to prevent thermal throttling) can say.
    I see two main aspects of this phone: 1) low-cost entry (for Apple) into the walled garden; 2) fantastic longevity for iOS updates.

    The longevity is icing on the cake, even if you don't use the A13 to its full potential. This phone is a home run and will probably pull more than a few Android users away.

    CuJoYYCqwerty52redgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 70
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,410member
    KITA said:
    Xed said:
    It also beats most laptops in single-core performance, too.
    In peak performance for specific tests, sure. When comparing to a laptop, there's a lot more than just what a peak Geekbench score (with pauses built in to prevent thermal throttling) can say.
    Intel chips on laptops & desktops also deploy thermal throttling. But the point of this test results comparison is not to suggest all other computing aspects are equal or should be ignored, but to point out with a quantifiable metric that on like-for-like testing, here is how Device A compares to Device B. Daringfireball's Gruber ran Geekbench tests for his review and the numbers speak for themselves -- Apple's A-series SoC are gaining ground on Intel's, exceeding the MBP in one metric today. It is reasonable to expect they will continue to gain ground in the near term future.

    https://daringfireball.net/2020/04/the_2020_iphone_se
    cornchippscooter63qwerty52redgeminipawatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 70
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,410member

    knowitall said:
    Apples prices are still too high to overcome a new wave of DIY and opensource hardware/software designs hitting the market/home.
    Industrie in the future will be totally distributed, and as such non existent.
    Oh yes, any year now the DIY neckbeards will inherit the earth. Hasn't happened in the past twenty years of Linux, but it's comin'! Riiight.
    cornchiplkruppAlgerBeatsentropysbadmonkwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 70
    XedXed Posts: 1,675member
    KITA said:

    Xed said:
    It also beats most laptops in single-core performance, too.
    In peak performance for specific tests, sure. When comparing to a laptop, there's a lot more than just what a peak Geekbench score (with pauses built in to prevent thermal throttling) can say.
    Sure, but it's also not trying to compete with a laptop and this sort of performance for a small, handheld, fanless. device is unheard of until recently which shows that ARM has been closing the gap (and Intel has been dropping the ball). Add in there Apple's amazing success with chip design, being able to remove wasted silicon, and building their SW to take advantage of their ion-house HW clearly shows the performance to watt advantage of an ARM Mac.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 70
    Apple basically sucker-punched all the Android companies: while those Android companies were focused on entering the premium ($1000+) market, Apple pulled a 360 and introduced a cost-friendly phone with a powerful mobile chip. What a time to be alive.

    One reason Apple is able to do this is because they design their own custom chip. I can't imagine Android manufacturers releasing a $400 with a Snapdragon 865 in it. Chip pricing is in Qualcomm's hands.

    I feel sorry for OnePlus: the day right after launching their first premium phone, Apple releases a budget-friendly and powerful phone (especially at a time of an uncertain economy). Ouch.

    It also means that mid-range Android phones have been put on notice: the eagle has landed in their territory.
    cornchippscooter63qwerty52watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 70
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,926member
    Apple basically sucker-punched all the Android companies: while those Android companies were focused on entering the premium ($1000+) market, Apple pulled a 360 and introduced a cost-friendly phone with a powerful mobile chip. What a time to be alive.

    One reason Apple is able to do this is because they design their own custom chip. I can't imagine Android manufacturers releasing a $400 with a Snapdragon 865 in it. Chip pricing is in Qualcomm's hands.

    I feel sorry for OnePlus: the day right after launching their first premium phone, Apple releases a budget-friendly and powerful phone (especially at a time of an uncertain economy). Ouch.

    It also means that mid-range Android phones have been put on notice: the eagle has landed in their territory.
    Yep. For a few years now, since A-series procs have been smoking virtually all droid offerings, all the fandroids can crow about now is “CHEAP CHEAP CHEAP.... CAMERA CAMERA CAMERA”. 

    Every so often you’ll run into a true Geekazoid that tries lamely to blather on about customization & google photo storage. Hopefully this SE will siphon off a good portion of the former camp to the rebels. But I’ve found over the years that there’s just a tremendous amount of Apple hate. I’ve never been able to figure it out completely, but there’s a very deep-rooted zeitgeist that Apple is overpriced and underspecced and I don’t know that even this model will be able to change that sentiment in any meaningful way. I have a feeling that most of the people who buy the new SE will be people like my mom who are still on the original SE.
    terrence1019qwerty52watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 70
    hmlongcohmlongco Posts: 435member
    KITA said:
    In peak performance for specific tests, sure. When comparing to a laptop, there's a lot more than just what a peak Geekbench score (with pauses built in to prevent thermal throttling) can say.
    Not sure why so many people have trouble with this. Yes, the A-series is throttled by power and thermal management constraints... on an iPhone and iPad.

    What happens whey you put it in a laptop with a laptop's power budget and thermal management?

    Give it a better cooling system and most of the throttling issues disappear.....
    edited April 2020 raoulduke42qwerty52watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 70
    XedXed Posts: 1,675member
    hmlongco said:
    KITA said:
    In peak performance for specific tests, sure. When comparing to a laptop, there's a lot more than just what a peak Geekbench score (with pauses built in to prevent thermal throttling) can say.
    Not sure why so many people have trouble with this. Yes, the A-series is throttled by power and thermal management constraints... on an iPhone and iPad.

    What happens whey you put it in a laptop with a laptop's power budget and thermal management?

    Give it a better cooling system and most of the throttling issues disappear…..
    ….and make it 12 core… and make them larger cores with higher clock speeds… and increase the RAM allowance… and add a considerably more powerful GPU.

    People keep underestimating what Apple's silicon will do despite what we've seen Apple do already when they kept saying that Apple has no chance.
    raoulduke42GG1StrangeDaysqwerty52lkruppwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 70
    seanismorrisseanismorris Posts: 1,624member
    For the iPhone SE, the performance of the processor is probably less important than the knowledge it will still (likely) receive OS and security updates for 6 years.  That’s three times the life of most Android phones.

    If you’re a business, it would be irresponsible to recommend the purchase an Android phone over that an iPhone SE.

    For any business purchase the standard is to lease (not buy) equipment for 3 years.  An iPhone will still be worth something.  An Android would be a security headache.

    Is it any wonder the iPhone is dominating?

    Google does have Android Enterprise Recommended
    https://bayton.org/docs/enterprise-mobility/android/what-is-android-enterprise-recommended/#android-enterprise-recommended-devices
    Here’s the problem:
    ”Be supported by the OEM for software/security patching for 3 years (or 5 for rugged)“

    Updates are still on the OEM, who are inconsistent at best in getting updates to users.  It’s a low priority.  Until Google does all the updates themselves, this isn’t a solution... and they can’t.

    When following the links of “enterprise” phones (on Googles site) I noted the price had been dropped to match that of the iPhone SE, and that was for their flagship phone.  That tells you everything you need to know.
    qwerty52Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 70
    p-dog said:
    And at a starting price of $399, the iPhone SE is yet again a threat to Android ASPs in their typical $250-$400 range. Many Android users are aspirational, only using their (non-flagship) Android phones because of their commodity prices. A super fast $400 iPhone can help them attain their dreams.
    If that were true then Android users would have used iPhones back when most carriers - basically all but T-Mobile - would give you the phone for free in return for a two year contract. They definitely would have switched when the iPhone SE came out. Look, everything that iPhone advocates have claimed would cause legions of Android owners to abandon the platform have come and gone. The end of AT&T exclusivity. The adoption of 4G. The switch to 64 bit. The switch to biometrics. Apple Pay. Privacy/security/malware issues. Apple going bigger than 4' screens. The iPhone SE. None of that has changed. Android OEMs - save HTC and Sony - haven't exited the business because for them Android devices are as profitable as anything else they make. Asus, Acer, ZTE etc. weren't rolling in billions before Android so not making iPhone profits is no reason for them to stop. (Xiaomi, Huawei, Oppo, OnePlus and others weren't selling consumer products - or literally didn't exist at all - before Android.) They won't until Android has a significant drop in marketshare. It hasn't. Despite DED's quarterly column for the past 12 years claiming that it would - which included various claims such as Google giving up on Android, OEMs abandoning Android for another OS, Microsoft crushing Android etc. - Android has maintained about 50% marketshare in the U.S. and 70% worldwide since breakthrough devices like the Samsung Galaxy S2 and Note, the LG G2 and the HTC One came about in 2011. People who want a cheap iPhone have always been able to get them. You can get an iPhone 7 cheaper than an iPhone SE 2 right now on major carriers and an iPhone 8 for the same price. So it is not aspirational. The Android advantages that DED dismissed above ... people like. Lots of them. That is why for the past several years study after study has shown Android users to be more loyal than their iPhone counterparts. They may switch from brand to brand. But they like what Android offers. People just like different things. No problem with that. You would expect Apple fans to understand this. Apple TV has a 13% market share. Macs have a 7 percent global market share. HomePods have a 3% market share. It has always been this way. The only products where Apple has ever enjoyed bigger than a 25% market share are the iPod, iPad (35%) and iPhone. So why is it that Apple fans insist on trying to justify the fact that 50% of the American population and 70% of the world population likes something else? People. Like. Android. Companies. Make. Money. Making. And. Selling. Android. Devices. It isn't going to change. If it does, the change will come from Google deciding to replace Android with Fuchsia. Google is expected to launch the first Fucshia device in 2021. Even if Fuchsia takes off it will just replace one Google platform that Apple fans irrationality hate with another.
    avon b7muthuk_vanalingamwillett
  • Reply 19 of 70
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,883member
    gentooguy said:
    p-dog said:
    And at a starting price of $399, the iPhone SE is yet again a threat to Android ASPs in their typical $250-$400 range. Many Android users are aspirational, only using their (non-flagship) Android phones because of their commodity prices. A super fast $400 iPhone can help them attain their dreams.
    If that were true then Android users would have used iPhones back when most carriers - basically all but T-Mobile - would give you the phone for free in return for a two year contract. They definitely would have switched when the iPhone SE came out. Look, everything that iPhone advocates have claimed would cause legions of Android owners to abandon the platform have come and gone. The end of AT&T exclusivity. The adoption of 4G. The switch to 64 bit. The switch to biometrics. Apple Pay. Privacy/security/malware issues. Apple going bigger than 4' screens. The iPhone SE. None of that has changed. Android OEMs - save HTC and Sony - haven't exited the business because for them Android devices are as profitable as anything else they make. Asus, Acer, ZTE etc. weren't rolling in billions before Android so not making iPhone profits is no reason for them to stop. (Xiaomi, Huawei, Oppo, OnePlus and others weren't selling consumer products - or literally didn't exist at all - before Android.) They won't until Android has a significant drop in marketshare. It hasn't. Despite DED's quarterly column for the past 12 years claiming that it would - which included various claims such as Google giving up on Android, OEMs abandoning Android for another OS, Microsoft crushing Android etc. - Android has maintained about 50% marketshare in the U.S. and 70% worldwide since breakthrough devices like the Samsung Galaxy S2 and Note, the LG G2 and the HTC One came about in 2011. People who want a cheap iPhone have always been able to get them. You can get an iPhone 7 cheaper than an iPhone SE 2 right now on major carriers and an iPhone 8 for the same price. So it is not aspirational. The Android advantages that DED dismissed above ... people like. Lots of them. That is why for the past several years study after study has shown Android users to be more loyal than their iPhone counterparts. They may switch from brand to brand. But they like what Android offers. People just like different things. No problem with that. You would expect Apple fans to understand this. Apple TV has a 13% market share. Macs have a 7 percent global market share. HomePods have a 3% market share. It has always been this way. The only products where Apple has ever enjoyed bigger than a 25% market share are the iPod, iPad (35%) and iPhone. So why is it that Apple fans insist on trying to justify the fact that 50% of the American population and 70% of the world population likes something else? People. Like. Android. Companies. Make. Money. Making. And. Selling. Android. Devices. It isn't going to change. If it does, the change will come from Google deciding to replace Android with Fuchsia. Google is expected to launch the first Fucshia device in 2021. Even if Fuchsia takes off it will just replace one Google platform that Apple fans irrationality hate with another.
    Your arguments would sell better if you used fucking paragraphs for readability.

    Other than that, and given Apple's outsized profits in a mature market compared to all of the Android OEM's in total, the current economic market is likely to drive out a whole lot of barely profitable builders, That should be good news for Samsung especially, and Huawei, who's ASP's, and margins, are considerably lower than Apple's.
    p-dogpscooter63StrangeDaysmuthuk_vanalingamjdb8167qwerty52Beatswatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 70
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,919member
    Apple’s silicon performance will peak shortly (it’s been flattening for a while now. It needs to move quickly and bring the hardware to the software i.e. creating custom ISA and logic pipelines for common, mature OS components. The GPU needs to be a Metal2 monster with hardware MPSRayIntersector acceleration.
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