Apple Watch continues to help save lives in a variety of ways

Posted:
in Apple Watch edited October 2020
The Apple Watch is continuing to be credited with helping save the lives of more people, with a roundup of reports bringing more stories about the life-changing events into focus.

The Apple Watch ECG function
The Apple Watch ECG function


Reports regularly surface where a person has been in distress or a life-threatening situation, only to be assisted by the Apple Watch in a variety of ways. In a collection of five stories about such events, the Apple Watch and its groundbreaking features are shown to be exceptional.

The group, compiled by CNET showcase different ways the Apple Watch provided help, ranging from the health-focused elements to the mainstay digital assistant Siri.

One year ago, Heather Hendershot of Pomona, Kansas received notifications on her Apple Watch saying her heart rate was above 120 beats per minute, part of the Apple Watch's high heart rate notification system. The notifications continued throughout the night despite a lack of symptoms, with Hendershot admitting she thought Apple's wearable was incorrect because "I couldn't feel my heart racing."

The following day, Henderson was taken to an urgent care clinic as a precaution, which resulted in a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism. "It wasn't until I heard the doctors mention ICU that I realized how serious the whole situation was," Henderson recounted.

"I'm not someone who checks their heart rate randomly," she continued, "so I'm very confident that I wouldn't have been able to detect it without the Apple Watch."

Some health feature changes in watchOS 7 include new workout types and sleep tracking.
Some health feature changes in watchOS 7 include new workout types and sleep tracking.


Another story from Jason Saucier of Orlando, Florida, in September 2019 had Apple's wearable giving warnings of possible heart problems, a few weeks after he started to feel unwell. "As soon as I put my watch on, it made a sound that I've never heard before. I looked down and it said that I was in aFib," Saucier claims.

After going to work that morning and enduring the repeated alert, Saucier eventually sought assistance from an emergency room after co-workers said he looked very pale. "As soon as I got there, the cardiac team got right on me and said that I was close to going into cardiac arrest," he adds.

After being discharged the following day, he had the same notification one week later, but went directly to the emergency room instead of ignoring it. Another five days in hospital, with three in aFib, and he was released with new heart medication.

"It's like a safety blanket," Saucier suggests of the Apple Watch. "I think it's probably going to be an ongoing thing for me for the rest of my life. And it's good that I have this watch to help me monitor it.

The Apple Watch encourages activity by closing its three iconic rings.
The Apple Watch encourages activity by closing its three iconic rings.


A third tale discussed how George Kometiani of Brooklyn, New York lost weight and became healthier. At the age of 30, he decided to do something about his poor health, caused by weighing close to 300 pounds, including knee clicks and snoring.

On the advice of his doctor, he lost 30 pounds by changing his eating habits, but on discovering he lost muscle mass and the snoring continued, he changed strategy to one surrounding the Apple Watch's famous rings. He made an effort to close his move ring every day, as well as taking note of the exercise challenges and other prodding notifications to get fitter.

"It really helped me understand how much effort I needed to put into my day," Kometiani insisted. "Those little things from a nonjudgmental, disconnected point of view really help." One year later, Kometiani had lost 100 pounds, as well as his snoring, joint pain, back aches, and headaches.

The report also includes stories that AppleInsider previously covered, such as Kacie Anderson's car accident and usage of Siri to call for help, and Toralv Ostvang of Norway gaining assistance from the police after triggering the fall detection feature late at night.

More stories citing the Apple Watch as behind the saving of a life or the improvement of someone's fitness are likely to continue for some time, and Apple is by no means finished with adding features and functionality. In watchOS 7, the Apple Watch will gain new sleep tracking functions, new health record data types, hearing health changes, four new workouts, a redesigned Fitness app, and a 20-second timer for washing hands.
gordo14841
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 39
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,531member
    Before Apple Watch, iKnockoff idiots were praising daddy Google because they were "extending life!" This was in reference to some moonshot medical project that never came to be.

    2020
    How many lives has Apple saved and "extended"?
    lolliverjony0
  • Reply 2 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
  • Reply 3 of 39
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,466member
    I now see them everywhere in my neck of the Midwest woods, on all age groups young and old. I see them more in my age group (retired, 65 and above). My cardiologist is sold on their basic usefulness in promoting health activity and detecting potential heart problems. 

    As with almost all new Apple products I remember vividly the predictions of doom from the usual suspects here and elsewhere. Nobody wears a watch anymore went the twaddle. When the first Apple Silicon Macs appear we’ll hear from the same morons. Instead of getting angry I’ll probably just smile and pity them.
    Fidonet127jony0
  • Reply 4 of 39
    adybadyb Posts: 199member
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    Although the first picture in the article shows that Apple Watch never checks for heart attacks.
    GeorgeBMacBeatslolliveranantksundaramRayz2016pulseimagesGG1king editor the gratesvanstromFidonet127
  • Reply 5 of 39
    XedXed Posts: 1,028member
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    So because it's not designed to warn of heart attacks we should ignore all the claims that it's actually helped save a life? What's your basis for that claim?
    GeorgeBMacBeatslolliveranantksundaramRayz2016pulseimagesGG1king editor the gratesvanstromFidonet127
  • Reply 6 of 39
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,277member
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 

    Apple is very clear and states repeatidly that the watch will NOT warn of heart attack.    It can't.  
    Faulting Apple Watch for not detecting a heart attack is like faulting a Porsche for not being able to haul a yard of topsoil.
    BeatsanantksundaramRayz2016GG1king editor the grateDAalsethlkruppjony0
  • Reply 7 of 39
    So what happens when you have an extended stay in a country that doesn’t approve the alerts? I’ve heard stories that it used to continue to work as long as you didn’t change your region but I’m also hearing that recent updates have disabled alerts based upon your location? Anybody in Australia actually have a US watch and will its EKG work in the current iOS?
  • Reply 8 of 39
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,531member
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 

    Apple is very clear and states repeatidly that the watch will NOT warn of heart attack.    It can't.  
    Faulting Apple Watch for not detecting a heart attack is like faulting a Porsche for not being able to haul a yard of topsoil.

    Will definitely be a future update. Half the things Watch can do I couldn't dream a watch could do. It's sci-fi in realtime.


    lkrupp said:
    I now see them everywhere in my neck of the Midwest woods, on all age groups young and old. I see them more in my age group (retired, 65 and above). My cardiologist is sold on their basic usefulness in promoting health activity and detecting potential heart problems. 

    As with almost all new Apple products I remember vividly the predictions of doom from the usual suspects here and elsewhere. Nobody wears a watch anymore went the twaddle. When the first Apple Silicon Macs appear we’ll hear from the same morons. Instead of getting angry I’ll probably just smile and pity them.

    Things I've seen in my lifetime:

    iPhone:
    "I already have a phone and an iPod. Don't need that overpriced toy."

    iPad:
    "LOL It's just a giant iPod touch!"

    Apple Watch:
    "No one is buying them!! TROLOLOL"
    lolliverRayz2016pulseimagessvanstromFidonet127jony0
  • Reply 9 of 39
    lolliverlolliver Posts: 429member

    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    It also doesn't cure cancer, provide immunity against COVID-19, give me the ability to fly or enable me to breath underwater. Of course Apple doesn't claim it can do any of those things either.

    Your argument is basically - don't trust what Apple claims the watch can do because the watch can't do the things Apple never claimed it could... 
    anantksundaramRayz2016GeorgeBMacbeowulfschmidtking editor the gratesvanstromFidonet127jony0
  • Reply 10 of 39
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,225member
    I fell off my bike a couple of days ago. Nothing serious, I was taking a slow tight turn, landed on my backside, just a couple scrapes.

    For the first time that I experienced it, fall detection on the Watch kicked in (I felt a strong haptic buzz) and it asked me if was ok or whether it should call emergency. 

    Wow, is all I can say. Wow. 
    pulseimagesGeorgeBMacGG1svanstromFidonet127jony0
  • Reply 11 of 39
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,225member
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    My Audi S5 doesn’t make me twenty years younger either. What’s your point?

    What an uninformed post...
    pulseimagesGeorgeBMacGG1king editor the grateFidonet127jony0
  • Reply 12 of 39
    hammeroftruthhammeroftruth Posts: 1,085member
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    What should the watch have done? 
    Warned your friend that his heart rate was elevated while he was RUNNING?
    When was the last time your friend had his heart checked out by a Cardiologist? 
    What do you think Apple claims the watch will do? Replace your doctor? 

    Look up Jim Fixx, he was a famous runner/jogger and had a heart attack and died while jogging at 52. 

    These gadgets are for you to use to get a better idea about what is going on with you, they are not a replacement for seeing your doctor to get a periodic checkup.  

    Plus, this might shock you, but you can go see doctors, get a clean bill of health and still drop dead just like you can if the watch doesn’t see any issues with your heart rate or ecg. 


    GG1king editor the grateFidonet127lolliverjony0
  • Reply 13 of 39
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,531member
    I really should have put the biggest Apple Watch critique from naysayers,
    Apple Watch:
    "LOL I can do all that stuff on my phone!"

    Funny how we've come full circle from not needing an iPhone to using our phones as an excuse to not needing an Apple Watch.
  • Reply 14 of 39
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,277member
    I fell off my bike a couple of days ago. Nothing serious, I was taking a slow tight turn, landed on my backside, just a couple scrapes.

    For the first time that I experienced it, fall detection on the Watch kicked in (I felt a strong haptic buzz) and it asked me if was ok or whether it should call emergency. 

    Wow, is all I can say. Wow. 

    I fell twice last fall -- tripping over leaf covered rocks while running.   And, both times, the watch asked if I had fallen.

    But, lately my grandson has me playing basketball and fall detection goes off pretty frequently.   I wish there was a way to turn it off on the watch.   Right now I have to go find my phone and fish through settings to turn it off -- while my grandson gives me a delay of game glare.

    But, all in all, I am very grateful for LTE and fall detection on the watch -- it has mostly replaced my phone which I don't carry nearly as much any more (certainly not while running or playing basketball).   The only thing I use my phone for anymore is typing detailed messages and screen stuff like Safari or FaceBook.
  • Reply 15 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member
    adyb said:
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    Although the first picture in the article shows that Apple Watch never checks for heart attacks.
    I tell my friend to get another watch thanks for your advice
  • Reply 16 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    Xed said:
    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    So because it's not designed to warn of heart attacks we should ignore all the claims that it's actually helped save a life? What's your basis for that claim?
    I have read an article (here) of a person being notified by their Apple Watch that they had an irregular heart beat, there is an app built in to this watch that monitors your heart beat. My point is don't put too much trust in this device as a real health monitor
  • Reply 17 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 

    Apple is very clear and states repeatidly that the watch will NOT warn of heart attack.    It can't.  
    Faulting Apple Watch for not detecting a heart attack is like faulting a Porsche for not being able to haul a yard of topsoil.
    I've never seen that statement from Apple could you point it out to me? My friend was running not driving a car or digging a ditch. He fortunately lives in Sweden so the hospital stay and test and treatment was all covered by that countries universal care. Just hope you don't experience a hear attack. 
  • Reply 18 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    My Audi S5 doesn’t make me twenty years younger either. What’s your point?

    What an uninformed post...
    My post is uninformed? Why is it you guys always talk about cars when comparing just about everything? As for Apple claims regarding its watch, health is probably the most important feature that is mentioned in ads and press releases. It is a watch and a fit bit all the other stuff is fluff. The reaction to my post confirms most guys here will defend no matter what as if my comment will hurt watch sales and eventually topple the Apple empire. 
  • Reply 19 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    lolliver said:

    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    It also doesn't cure cancer, provide immunity against COVID-19, give me the ability to fly or enable me to breath underwater. Of course Apple doesn't claim it can do any of those things either.

    Your argument is basically - don't trust what Apple claims the watch can do because the watch can't do the things Apple never claimed it could... 
    Apple Watch is a health centered device just after being a pretty watch. It has a heart monitor, cases of irregular heart beats have been mentioned by Apple in press releases. I never mentioned those other illnesses, Apple Watch monitors your heart, but apparently according to the usual AI "defend Apple at all cost" readers denial is fast and often bitchy. 
  • Reply 20 of 39
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,439member

    spice-boy said:
    A very close friend of mine who is 52 hard a heart attack while out running recently, he was wearing his Apple Watch 5. He told me the day after that is Apple Watch never signaled anything was wrong before or during the attack. My point don't put too much weight behind what Apple claims about this device. 
    What should the watch have done? 
    Warned your friend that his heart rate was elevated while he was RUNNING?
    When was the last time your friend had his heart checked out by a Cardiologist? 
    What do you think Apple claims the watch will do? Replace your doctor? 

    Look up Jim Fixx, he was a famous runner/jogger and had a heart attack and died while jogging at 52. 

    These gadgets are for you to use to get a better idea about what is going on with you, they are not a replacement for seeing your doctor to get a periodic checkup.  

    Plus, this might shock you, but you can go see doctors, get a clean bill of health and still drop dead just like you can if the watch doesn’t see any issues with your heart rate or ecg. 


    The only thing you forgot to say was " sorry about your friend hope he is ok" in your defense of Apple. This device monitors our heart, irregular hear beats have been reported on this very site, and you all basked in the glory of Apple saving lives. Seriously you put Apple ahead of everything including my friend's life.
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