Apple adds celebrity 'Time to Walk' audio workouts in Apple Fitness+

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 25
A new "walking experience" featuring celebrity guests recounting part of their life story has been added to Apple Watch for users of Apple Fitness+.

Musician and businesswoman Dolly Parton is among the first of the
Musician and businesswoman Dolly Parton is among the first of the "Time to Walk" celebrity guests.


Apple has launched a new workout for Apple Watch, a weekly exclusive for users who also subscribe to Apple Fitness+. "Time to Walk" is a series of audio episodes in which a guest celebrity talks for between 25 to 40 minutes as users walk.

"Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

"Even throughout this challenging period of time, one activity that has remained available to many is walking," he continues. "With 'Time to Walk,' we're bringing weekly original content to Apple Watch in Fitness+ that includes some of the most diverse, fascinating, and celebrated guests offering inspiration and entertainment to help our users keep moving through the power of walking."

The four initial celebrity walking guides in Time to Walk
The four initial celebrity walking guides in Time to Walk


"Time to Walk" launches with several episodes, which will be followed by more each Monday until the end of April. The four included at launch consist of audio talks from:

  • Dolly Parton, musician and businesswoman

  • Draymond Green, NBA player

  • Shawn Mendes, musician

  • Uzo Aduba, Emmy award winning actor

As each celebrity talks you through the importance of walking in their own lives, a series of images is shown on Apple Watch. Then as they finish talking, each celebrity guest will introduce a short playlist of songs which users can continue walking to.

The new "Time to Walk" feature requires iOS 14.3, on an iPhone 6s or later, or iPhone SE. It also requires watchOS 7.2 or later, on an Apple Watch Series 3, or later. The service appears to have been slowly rolling out, but when available, the new exercises appear in Apple Watch's Workout app.

Recently, Apple CEO Tim Cook himself extolled the mental benefits of walking, particularly around Apple Park, in an interview with Outside magazine.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    A very odd addition to fitness +.


    buttesilverrazorpit
  • Reply 2 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 3 of 25
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    Apple has launched a new workout for Apple Watch, a weekly exclusive for users who also subscribe to Apple Fitness+. "Time to Walk" is a series of audio episodes in which a guest celebrity talks for between 25 to 40 minutes as users walk. is a series of audio episodes in which a guest celebrity talks for between 25 to 40 minutes as users walk.

    That’s usually called a podcast isn’t it?
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 4 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Apple has launched a new workout for Apple Watch, a weekly exclusive for users who also subscribe to Apple Fitness+. "Time to Walk" is a series of audio episodes in which a guest celebrity talks for between 25 to 40 minutes as users walk. is a series of audio episodes in which a guest celebrity talks for between 25 to 40 minutes as users walk.

    That’s usually called a podcast isn’t it?

    That may depend on the subject rather than the delivery method.  One is coaching and the other education, relaxation or enjoyment.

    In this case it sounds like it's a coach encouraging a person to walk -- and maybe to walk further, faster and higher than they would have otherwise.
  • Reply 5 of 25
    stuffestuffe Posts: 392member
    Walking is brilliant for Apple Fitness, I can't wait for them to put some more gentle stuff for elderly and/or injured people to enable them to feel like they are not second class citizens to all us super fit adrenaline junkies.  My mother has an Apple Watch and is in my Apple 1 family membership and I so wish that there was stuff for her, aged late 70s, like very simple yoga and ultra low impact and slow classes that will allow her to improve her health more not just monitor it.  It might be a simple first step, but imagine a series of exercise programs by older people for older people, with age appropriate music and presenters, pensioners are simply not interested in being boosted by cool fit people half a century younger listening to HipHop, so less elitism and more inclusiveness.

    edited January 25 muthuk_vanalingammusicmandwsStrangeDaysinTIMidatorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 25
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,525member
    A very odd addition to fitness +.



    Very innovative, out-of-the-box, Apple-like. Will be mocked today and copied tomorrow.
    musicmandwsStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 25
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 828member
    "Time to Walk" launches with several episodes, which will be followed by more each Monday until the end of April.”

    Why the end of April? Do they just stop making them at that point? Or reevaluate their popularity before producing more? Why is there an end date?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 25
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 828member
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    A typical GeorgeBMac response. 
    I personally know 2 people who have lost over 100 pounds JUST FROM WALKING. So, they took what they wanted to hear and were willing to do and used that advice to completely transform their lives. To the point where both have continued their fitness journey to include running and are currently training to run their first race, whenever that is allowed to happen. So they might disagree with you there Georgie-boy. 
    razorpitinTIMidatorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 25
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 828member
    Beats said:
    A very odd addition to fitness +.



    Very innovative, out-of-the-box, Apple-like. Will be mocked today and copied tomorrow.
    Agreed. This fills a hole which many people were asking for at launch. Maybe they had planned this all along, or maybe it’s just in response to those requests, but either way it shows Apple is committed to improving Fitness+ and giving users what they want. Others will follow. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    stuffe said:
    Walking is brilliant for Apple Fitness, I can't wait for them to put some more gentle stuff for elderly and/or injured people to enable them to feel like they are not second class citizens to all us super fit adrenaline junkies.  My mother has an Apple Watch and is in my Apple 1 family membership and I so wish that there was stuff for her, aged late 70s, like very simple yoga and ultra low impact and slow classes that will allow her to improve her health more not just monitor it.  It might be a simple first step, but imagine a series of exercise programs by older people for older people, with age appropriate music and presenters, pensioners are simply not interested in being boosted by cool fit people half a century younger listening to HipHop, so less elitism and more inclusiveness.


    Speaking as somebody in their 70's, your assumptions that aging and debility are one in the same has been my greatest enemy.  
    When I find a trainer, doctor or therapist who believes that I dump them immediately before they poison my brain.

    At 70 I am in the best health and the best fitness I have been in since I was 40 -- and probably my 20's.
    But, it takes work:   I do flexibility, core and strength training as well as run 4-6 miles most every day of the week.

    Those "old timers" who haven't taken care of themselves tell me I am "lucky".  And, in one sense I am since, as a nurse, I am aware of all the things that can happen to a body.   But I also have come to understand that often those things are the result of unhealthy lifestyles (even though, in the west, those lifestyles are considered normal rather than unhealthy).

    One of my biggest wake up calls was when I turned 60 and met a guy nearly 80 on the trail.   He could blow my doors off  biking or running (which I could not do at all back then) any day who chose.   He showed me what was possible.
    edited January 25 muthuk_vanalingamStrangeDays
  • Reply 11 of 25
    Did the walk with Sean Mendes this morning. Usually I listen to podcasts while walking after having done 30 minutes of Fitness+ core and strength training. It was a nice change of pace and I look forward to more. Also a good way to learn about music and musicians I normally don’t hear. I’m 75 and am really glad Apple has been there to help fill the gap while my gym is closed. Am saddened by all the naysayers on this comments thread. 
    musicmandwsGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 25
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    Walking is perfectly fine aerobic exercise. You are acting like all walking is some sort of causal stroll. If you pick up your pace you can absolutely elevate your heart rate up. 

    People being elitists about health and fitness is what turns so many people away from it. 
  • Reply 13 of 25
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 828member
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    Walking is perfectly fine aerobic exercise. You are acting like all walking is some sort of causal stroll. If you pick up your pace you can absolutely elevate your heart rate up. 

    People being elitists about health and fitness is what turns so many people away from it. 
    Exactly. I’d like to see someone walk a 5k with 14 minute splits and tell me it’s not vigorous exercise. Bottom line, it’s one of the best active recovery activities for rest days that you can do and also works well as part of a cross training regiment. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 25
    As a person who suffers with mental health issues, sometimes it can be very hard to motivate oneself to run. Knowing that I can still exercise by doing a good vigorous walk can give a vital sense of fulfilment and be great motivation knowing I can close those rings even if I don’t feel able to run. On those dark days any achievement is a massive positive. I’m really looking forward to trying them out.
    Japheywatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    Walking is perfectly fine aerobic exercise. You are acting like all walking is some sort of causal stroll. If you pick up your pace you can absolutely elevate your heart rate up. 

    People being elitists about health and fitness is what turns so many people away from it. 

    No,not elitist.   Certainly not.   Just realistic.  
    I was referring to the health care industry portraying walking as the goal rather than the minimum.  And, as I mentioned, it's not only just getting (or not getting) the heart rate up but that we need to more -- specifically the stuff I mentioned in the post you're replying to.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 16 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    Japhey said:
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    Walking is perfectly fine aerobic exercise. You are acting like all walking is some sort of causal stroll. If you pick up your pace you can absolutely elevate your heart rate up. 

    People being elitists about health and fitness is what turns so many people away from it. 
    Exactly. I’d like to see someone walk a 5k with 14 minute splits and tell me it’s not vigorous exercise. Bottom line, it’s one of the best active recovery activities for rest days that you can do and also works well as part of a cross training regiment. 

    Yes, I do use walking on my recovery days.  It helps keep things moving and it loosens up tight muscles.   And yes, 14 minute walking miles is quick.
  • Reply 17 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    As a person who suffers with mental health issues, sometimes it can be very hard to motivate oneself to run. Knowing that I can still exercise by doing a good vigorous walk can give a vital sense of fulfilment and be great motivation knowing I can close those rings even if I don’t feel able to run. On those dark days any achievement is a massive positive. I’m really looking forward to trying them out.

    Any exercise is good exercise.   There is no such thing as a bad walk.  Best of luck -- I know it can take a lot to get out there sometimes.   But it may be one of the best things you can do for yourself.   Are you able to get to forests?  Sometimes just being out in nature can help as well.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 18 of 25
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    Japhey said:
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    A typical GeorgeBMac response. 
    I personally know 2 people who have lost over 100 pounds JUST FROM WALKING. So, they took what they wanted to hear and were willing to do and used that advice to completely transform their lives. To the point where both have continued their fitness journey to include running and are currently training to run their first race, whenever that is allowed to happen. So they might disagree with you there Georgie-boy. 

    I know someone who reversed his weight gain and encroaching diabetes by swapping their bus ride for a 5k walk to and from work. 

    His weight gain came from a back injury that meant he couldn’t run on roads, and with the gyms being shut …

    edited January 26 Japheywatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 25
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    How it started:


    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.


    Screech of brakes:


    No,not elitist.   Certainly not.   Just realistic.  


    How it ended:


    Any exercise is good exercise.   There is no such thing as a bad walk. 

    Walking is the same as any exercise. The trick is effort and regularity, and it’s doable for folk who have spinal problems. 

    Certainly wouldn’t call it the bare minimum. 
    Darts is the bare minimum. 
    edited January 26 razorpitJapheywatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 25
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Japhey said:
    ...

    "Walking is the most popular physical activity in the world, and one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies," said Jay Blahnik, Apple's senior director of Fitness Technologies, in a statement. "A walk can often be more than just exercise: It can help clear the mind, solve a problem, or welcome a new perspective."

    ...
    Ummm?   One of the healthiest?

    No, I would call it the bare minimum.
    Too often health professionals -- even fitness gurus -- take healthy lifestyles down to the lowest common denominator, catering to what people want to hear or are willing to do rather than what they need to hear and need to do.

    The National Institute on Aging recommends:
    --  Aerobic exercise that raises the heart rate (they do not set a maximum to how high it should go)
    --  Strength Training
    --  Flexibility Training
    --  Balance (core) Training

    A walk in the park is, admittedly, better than nothing.   But barely.

    Fortunately though, Apple Fitness+ encourages and enables all of that.  And a person, especially an older person, needs to do all of that to stay functional for as long as possible.
    A typical GeorgeBMac response. 
    I personally know 2 people who have lost over 100 pounds JUST FROM WALKING. So, they took what they wanted to hear and were willing to do and used that advice to completely transform their lives. To the point where both have continued their fitness journey to include running and are currently training to run their first race, whenever that is allowed to happen. So they might disagree with you there Georgie-boy. 

    I know someone who reversed his weight gain and encroaching diabetes by swapping their bus ride for a 5k walk to and from work. 

    His weight gain came from a back injury that meant he couldn’t run on roads, and with the gyms being shut …

     That's good -- and any exercise is better than no exersise -- but.the healthcare industry bills walking as the goal when it should be the minimum.

    Sorry if reality triggered you and made your head explode.
    edited January 26
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