Apple fires leader of #AppleToo movement

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 15
#AppleToo leader Janneke Parrish has reportedly been fired by Apple, with the company claiming it is because she deleted files off her work phone during an investigation.

Apple Park


Apple Maps program manager Janneke Parrish was accused of deleting files that reportedly included the apps Robinhood, Pokemon GO, and Google Drive, and by doing so, impeding an investigation. According to The Verge, Apple staffers believe that the firing is actually retaliation for her work organizing the group that talks about conditions within the company.

"We can confirm she is no longer with Apple," Parrish's attorney, Vincent P. White of White, Hilferty, and Albanese told The Verge, "but cannot speak further to address the situation at this time."

Parrish previously said publicly that she was disappointed with CEO Tim Cook's all-hands meeting, which was set up to discuss the issues of pay equality and harassment. "With the answers Tim gave today," she said, "we weren't heard."

This is the second reported firing after an Apple employee spoke out about the company.

The first was senior engineering program manager Ashley Gjovik, who Apple accused of disclosing unspecified confidential information. Gjovik was previously put on administrative leave, following months of her tweeting about the hostile working environment within Apple.

#AppleToo was originally formed as a Discord channel, and it was created to raise the topics of workplace harassment, discrimination, sexism, racism, and more. Within four days of it launching, #AppleToo received nearly 500 reports of workplace issues at Apple.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 62

    Some of these recent firings, like this one and Ashley Gjøvik’s case, sure looks like pretenses to get rid of employees who have been too vocal about issues at Apple. It’s not a good look. 

    ronnbala1234narwhalxyzzy-xxxdarkvadercuriousrun8williamlondoncrowleyiOSDevSWEOfer
  • Reply 2 of 62
    sbdudesbdude Posts: 121member
    heli0s said:

    Some of these recent firings, like this one and Ashley Gjøvik’s case, sure looks like pretenses to get rid of employees who have been too vocal about issues at Apple. It’s not a good look. 


    Because the opposite can't be true at all, right?
    lkruppWeeturcfawilliamlondonfoaddk49omasoumagman1979socalbriananantksundaram
  • Reply 3 of 62
    shaminoshamino Posts: 490member
    I don't know any more about the case than what's already been reported, but I wonder why anybody would be keeping personal apps/data on a work phone.

    If she was actually running Robinhood, Pokemon and Google Drive on a work phone, i wonder why.

    Don't people know that your work phone is property of your employer and they therefore have a right to anything and everything you put on it?

    If you want to run personal apps, keep them on your personal phone, which your employer has no right to access (although they may also prohibit you from bringing it onto a corporate campus or connecting to the corporate Wi-Fi).

    Ditto for your work laptop.  Don't put any personal apps/data on it that you wouldn't want your employer to see.  Keep personal stuff on your personal computer (which, again, you might not be allowed to bring to the office).
    thtrcfatylersdadllamabaconstangmagman1979equality72521anantksundaramkillroyWhiskeyTango
  • Reply 4 of 62
    heli0s said:

    Some of these recent firings, like this one and Ashley Gjøvik’s case, sure looks like pretenses to get rid of employees who have been too vocal about issues at Apple. It’s not a good look. 

    Apple fires people with cause all the time and you never hear about it. You just know about these two because of their use of the press.
    rcfawilliamlondonllamabaconstangmagman1979socalbrianequality72521anantksundaramkillroyWhiskeyTango
  • Reply 5 of 62
    Apple Computer: Nice products but you wouldn't want to work there.
    darkvaderbaconstangOfercat52AppleUfmyI
  • Reply 6 of 62
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,747member
    And...welcome to the real world, sweetheart.  This is the rude awakening your entitled generation is experiencing.  In said real world, you work for a private sector employer.  That means you don't get to criticize your boss or company in public without being fired.  That means no one in your company cares about your opinion outside of your area of expertise.  That means unless you can prove a legal violation, you can be eighty-sixed for almost any reason, or no reason at all.  Yours is the generation who thinks if you state your "concerns" about your superiors respectfully, they'll not only be listened to, but acted upon.  It reminds me of the interns who were canned some years ago because they wrote a letter challenging the employer's dress code.  They were flabbergasted that their reasonable, respectful letter telling their bosses how to run their company got them axed. 

    Want to be able to speak out?  Either get a public sector job where your freedom of speech is less curtailed (it's true) or start you own business.  
    rcfallamabaconstangomasoumagman1979Fred257socalbrianequality72521anantksundaramJFPotts
  • Reply 7 of 62
    Calls for pay equality is such a problematic cause to join because it doesn't factor in the methods used to give two people doing the same job different (unequal) pay. For example, one person might be more/less efficient, might have a better/worse rapport with their co-workers, they might simply be more/less friendly, is always at work on-time or late, or they might simply do the job better/worse.

    What's even more problematic is that it also auto-ascribes the differences in pay to sexism and racism which is possible but very improbable. Such concerns are the very reason why companies have HR managers.

    If an employee were to bring his/her concerns to HR and they deem those concerns to be unfounded then people should just assume that the reasons for the inequity are those I initially referenced rather than ascribing an "-ism" agenda. If people can't deal with the fact that they are the reason for the inequity.... then they should work on their coping skills or LEAVE THE COMPANY and take your toxic "-ism" ideas elsewhere snowflake!
    edited October 15 chadbagrcfabaconstangomasoumagman1979entropyssocalbriananantksundaramMicDorseyanonconformist
  • Reply 8 of 62
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,521member
    Apple Computer: Nice products but you wouldn't want to work there.
    Rather ignorant.   I know a few people who work at Apple and love it.   Not for me, personally, but plenty of people want to work there, and like working there.  
    rcfaadhausdotcomwilliamlondonroundaboutnowtdknoxmagman1979socalbrianequality72521anantksundaramkillroy
  • Reply 9 of 62
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,124member
    Good riddance! Another entitled brat who tried to politicize the workplace, and get a fat payout as a result.

    In a country like Russia, they would have a car accident.

    In the US they will sue, until the company will settle for a large sum of money under an NDA not admitting any guilt, just to avoid the damage to the reputation the continued legal action causes. You can bet that’s the endgame of her and her lawyer.
    She’ll try to claim whistleblower status (even though there was nothing to blow a whistle about) and then sue for wrongful termination.
    Some woke idiot in Hollywood, likely from competing corporations like Netflix or Amazon Video, might even offer a dramatized movie deal, where “based on actual events” something despicable is covered up in a company called Prune Computer, Inc., just different enough that Apple can’t sue for defamation…

    Bad behavior gets rewarded these days, because due to entitlement, wokeness, nobody dares to tell such people anymore: “You’re a loser, pack up your sh*t and f*ck off!”

    A generation that wants communist equality, at a capitalist level of wealth, while being lazy and irresponsible.
    williamlondontylersdadbaconstangmagman1979entropyssocalbriananantksundaramequality72521mobirdkillroy
  • Reply 10 of 62
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,582member
    In the name of "whatever that crap"; employees think and they feel indispensable irrespective of company like Apple is fair and compensates lot to employees; go out and thrash management. I would not wait a second to fire such employee.
    williamlondonlkruppmagman1979dave3938zonetukemike1
  • Reply 11 of 62


    What's even more problematic is that it also auto-ascribes the differences in pay to sexism and racism which is possible but very improbable. Such concerns are the very reason why companies have HR managers.


    When you don't have facts on your side, the default position is to view everything through the lens of racism and sexism. 
    lkruppbaconstangomasousocalbriananantksundaramOfermobirdcat52elijahgWhiskeyTango
  • Reply 12 of 62
    Who this isn't a good look for is AppleInsider. How far down the rabbit hole is AI willing to go with these posts that insinuate things that aren't proven and likely can't be proven? Because it's Apple we need to hear workplace grievances aired that have nothing to do with Apple products and services, and no one can verify whether they point to anything tangible for a customer to know?

    Too many tech sites have made a career out of insinuation-journalism, where even scant evidence is used to prove a predetermined case. Reasoning like this: "If only .1% of the Apple workforce is alledging institutionally bad behavior, that's just evidence everyone else is too scared to talk."

    AI, it's not too late to drop this kind of stuff. 
    edited October 15 Weetulkruppanonconformist
  • Reply 13 of 62
    AI_liasAI_lias Posts: 410member
    So, she said she wants the discussions between her and Apple recorded in writing, and Apple didn't say no, or yes, just went off and assumed she didn't want to participate in that discussion (about IP). The next thing, is she was fired and access cut off. That is the point of contention here. Honestly doesn't look good for Apple, if this is true.
    williamlondonronnkillroycat52
  • Reply 14 of 62
    sdw2001 said:
    And...welcome to the real world, sweetheart.  This is the rude awakening your entitled generation is experiencing.  In said real world, you work for a private sector employer.  That means you don't get to criticize your boss or company in public without being fired.  That means no one in your company cares about your opinion outside of your area of expertise.  That means unless you can prove a legal violation, you can be eighty-sixed for almost any reason, or no reason at all.  Yours is the generation who thinks if you state your "concerns" about your superiors respectfully, they'll not only be listened to, but acted upon.  It reminds me of the interns who were canned some years ago because they wrote a letter challenging the employer's dress code.  They were flabbergasted that their reasonable, respectful letter telling their bosses how to run their company got them axed. 

    Want to be able to speak out?  Either get a public sector job where your freedom of speech is less curtailed (it's true) or start you own business.  
    And these are the folks who will run America in the future? God help us!!!
    magman1979MicDorsey
  • Reply 15 of 62
    omasouomasou Posts: 264member
    heli0s said:

    Some of these recent firings, like this one and Ashley Gjøvik’s case, sure looks like pretenses to get rid of employees who have been too vocal about issues at Apple. It’s not a good look. 

    There's a difference between being vocal and being disruptive and combative

    Both were not exercising good judgement in what they said, how they said it and where they said it.
    WeetuwilliamlondonsocalbrianMicDorseydave3938jony0
  • Reply 16 of 62
    Here's a typical scenario of what might have happened...

    1. Apple HR requests a meeting.
    2. Employee is told that an investigation into the employee conduct is being started.
    3. At the meeting Apple requests access to her Apple Corporate telephone to conduct an investigation.
    4. Employee says she does not have it and will provide it.
    5. Employee leaves and then deletes certain apps and data before providing the requested Apple corporate telephone to Hr.
    6. Apple examines the Apple corporate telephone and immediately finds date stamps showing that data was deleted between the time of the HR meeting and when the Apple corporate telephone was surrendered.

    What is this Apple employee going to sue for? The employee acted unprofessionally by deleting information from an iPhone she knew was under investigation. There is no "ism" involved. Rather than letting the investigation play out she panicked.

    A bigger issue...Perhaps Apple will begin to realize that mixing politics with business is in the long run a no-win scenario.
    entropysmobirdkillroyanonconformistdave3938pumpkin_kingshamino
  • Reply 17 of 62
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,831member
    sdw2001 said:
    And...welcome to the real world, sweetheart.  This is the rude awakening your entitled generation is experiencing.  In said real world, you work for a private sector employer.  That means you don't get to criticize your boss or company in public without being fired.  That means no one in your company cares about your opinion outside of your area of expertise.  That means unless you can prove a legal violation, you can be eighty-sixed for almost any reason, or no reason at all.  Yours is the generation who thinks if you state your "concerns" about your superiors respectfully, they'll not only be listened to, but acted upon.  It reminds me of the interns who were canned some years ago because they wrote a letter challenging the employer's dress code.  They were flabbergasted that their reasonable, respectful letter telling their bosses how to run their company got them axed. 

    Want to be able to speak out?  Either get a public sector job where your freedom of speech is less curtailed (it's true) or start you own business.  
    & which generation sat back whilst they were socially engineered for this inevitable outcome?
    elijahgMicDorseyFileMakerFellerfastasleep
  • Reply 18 of 62
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,747member
    mcdave said:
    sdw2001 said:
    And...welcome to the real world, sweetheart.  This is the rude awakening your entitled generation is experiencing.  In said real world, you work for a private sector employer.  That means you don't get to criticize your boss or company in public without being fired.  That means no one in your company cares about your opinion outside of your area of expertise.  That means unless you can prove a legal violation, you can be eighty-sixed for almost any reason, or no reason at all.  Yours is the generation who thinks if you state your "concerns" about your superiors respectfully, they'll not only be listened to, but acted upon.  It reminds me of the interns who were canned some years ago because they wrote a letter challenging the employer's dress code.  They were flabbergasted that their reasonable, respectful letter telling their bosses how to run their company got them axed. 

    Want to be able to speak out?  Either get a public sector job where your freedom of speech is less curtailed (it's true) or start you own business.  
    & which generation sat back whilst they were socially engineered for this inevitable outcome?
    Some might say my generation (X).  But I don't think that's it for the most part.  We are now in our 40's and early 50's.  This entitlement really manifested itself in the children of the younger boomers (Millennials) and their children (Generation Z).  And it has been building from there. I do think it will turn around to an extent though.  I think we are past peak woke.  
    entropyscat52elijahgh2p
  • Reply 19 of 62
    Apple Computer: Nice products but you wouldn't want to work there.
    Yes and that is my friend who came from east coast NYC finance learned too. Even their development process is weak comparing to what we use in big software shops in finance. If you do not know what is big, one floor of financial company has more operations line of code than entire Microsoft. I co-owned literally 2 million lines of code of trading system. Small piece of what else was on the floor. When he said of their weak process and ow to fix it they did not agree so, he played to leave that garbage Now Zoox pays probably better and has better process as Amazon project. Apple as much as achieved top in technology has a lot to learn to be more efficient. Keyword is automated testing and avoiding repeat mistakes in code. If they want people to work on weekends because management does not want investing into automated testing and people have to do it on time that normally would be their private time then Apple will have to pay more to those engineers.
    edited October 15 williamlondonOferelijahgIreneW
  • Reply 20 of 62
    shamino said:
    I don't know any more about the case than what's already been reported, but I wonder why anybody would be keeping personal apps/data on a work phone.

    If she was actually running Robinhood, Pokemon and Google Drive on a work phone, i wonder why.

    Don't people know that your work phone is property of your employer and they therefore have a right to anything and everything you put on it?

    If you want to run personal apps, keep them on your personal phone, which your employer has no right to access (although they may also prohibit you from bringing it onto a corporate campus or connecting to the corporate Wi-Fi).

    Ditto for your work laptop.  Don't put any personal apps/data on it that you wouldn't want your employer to see.  Keep personal stuff on your personal computer (which, again, you might not be allowed to bring to the office).
    I was reading an article a few weeks ago that said one someone starts at Apple they are encouraged to use their personal Apple IDs for work instead of creating one specifically for work.
    Ofercat52elijahg
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