Rumor: iPhone 15 USB-C cable limited to USB 2.0 speeds, has no MFi

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in iPhone

A new leak shows that USB-C charging cable for the iPhone 15 will transfer data at USB 2.0 speeds, and there is no MFi authentication on the cable.

Render of the expected iPhone 15 Pro chassis design. (Source: AppleInsider)

While recent predictions of the iPhone 15 range's expected USB-C connector have concentrated on it potentially having Thunderbolt/USB4 data transfer speeds, a new leak says Apple is continuing to make a USB-C charging cable that will transfer data at USB 2.0 rates.

Adding to the now countless leaked images of USB-C components -- ranging from apparently fake to probably real -- the new leak focuses instead on the specs of one cable. Alongside recent rumors that Apple's USB-C charging cable will be longer, it's claimed that Apple's latest USB-C charging cable transfers data perhaps not much better than Lightning.

This is not new, of course. The USB-C cable that Apple includes in Macs that need it to charge transfers data at USB 2.0 speeds.

All of this is according to leaker Majin Bu, who has a somewhat shaky reputation for leak accuracy.

New iPhone 15 USB C Cable Info Confirmed
1.6M long
16Pins
Thicker and more resistant
USB 2.0 20V3A
No MFI pic.twitter.com/WV4unodWPg

-- Majin Bu (@MajinBuOfficial)


The leak also says that there will be "No MFI," or no "made for iPhone" certification chip on the cable, nor will it be required. It had been rumored that while Apple would switch to USB-C for the iPhone 15, it would also limit or throttle data speeds for cables if they were not certified in its MFI program.

That rumor was strong enough that the European Union said it would block iPhones being sold in its territory if that proved to be the case.

Later in that X/Twitter thread, the leaker agrees with commentators that the faster USB4 speed will probably be on the iPhone 15 Pro models, but adds, "I'm investigating."

Separately, there has been some confusion over the European Union's law demanding that all smartphones use USB-C in 2024. It's not a retrospective law, so Apple is only really required to make the change for its 2024 release of the iPhone 16 range.

Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 43
    The EU warned about such shenanigans, so if they do do that, it will be a costly mistake.
    williamlondonpscooter63
  • Reply 2 of 43
    clexmanclexman Posts: 205member
    Pdybman said:
    The EU warned about such shenanigans, so if they do do that, it will be a costly mistake.
    What shenanigans? It says no MFi. 
    williamlondonnubusforgot usernamewatto_cobrapscooter63
  • Reply 3 of 43
    igorskyigorsky Posts: 744member
    clexman said:
    Pdybman said:
    The EU warned about such shenanigans, so if they do do that, it will be a costly mistake.
    What shenanigans? It says no MFi. 
    Shenanigans = Apple wanting to run it’s business without the EU’s meddling 
    edited August 2023 entropyswatto_cobraAnilu_777dewme
  • Reply 4 of 43
    The USB-C transfer rate, I believe, was not a part of the EU dogma. The new phone potentially has a USB-C socket and that is all that was required.
    forgot usernamewatto_cobraAnilu_777dewmepscooter63
  • Reply 5 of 43
    and when you use a thunderbolt 2 3 or 4 Kabel you get the Relevant speed. As Apple with Intel hold the patent?
    The next question is do I get up to 90W charging with the right Kabel and power supply, like with the iPads?
    forgot usernamewatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 43
    Pdybman said:
    The EU warned about such shenanigans, so if they do do that, it will be a costly mistake.

    What shenanigans?  Such a cable complies with the law.  Isn't that was the EU wants, compliance with their laws?

    Of course, The Law of Unintended Consequences will always win in the end...
    Xedentropysforgot usernameAlex1Nwatto_cobraAnilu_777dewme
  • Reply 7 of 43
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 764member
    This sounds very plausibly Apple. I could imagine that Thunderbolt speeds are "available" on the Pro models, but you will need to buy an additional Thunderbotl USB-C cable that supports those speeds to achieve them. It's like wired mode on the $549 Airpods Max which requires an additional $35 cable to use and only Apple sells it. This would, however, be a giant middle finger to EU regulations since the phone's full capabilities couldn't be realized without buying an extra specialized cable, the very thing that the regulations were meant to stop. 
    williamlondonelijahgentropysAlex1Nwatto_cobraAnilu_777
  • Reply 8 of 43
    ctt_zhctt_zh Posts: 63member
    charlesn said:
    This sounds very plausibly Apple. I could imagine that Thunderbolt speeds are "available" on the Pro models, but you will need to buy an additional Thunderbotl USB-C cable that supports those speeds to achieve them. It's like wired mode on the $549 Airpods Max which requires an additional $35 cable to use and only Apple sells it. This would, however, be a giant middle finger to EU regulations since the phone's full capabilities couldn't be realized without buying an extra specialized cable, the very thing that the regulations were meant to stop. 
    If Apple is going to give its customers a data transfer experience akin to a budget Android phone unless they buy additional cables, then the giant middle finger really isn't being pointed at the EU...
    edited August 2023 napoleon_phoneapartwilliamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamelijahgmobirdAlex1N
  • Reply 9 of 43
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,538member
    While this should satisfy the desire for a universal connector standard, it’s curious as to why Apple would want to limit the new capabilities when it’s so easy to give it full throttle. They actually have to work harder to limit it.  I can’t see how such an artificial limitation is a benefit for Apple’s customers. 
    AppleZuluAlex1NAnilu_777jas99pscooter63
  • Reply 10 of 43
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,934member
    I can’t see dedicating the real estate to do it, but Apple could accomplish a big F.U. by selling E.U.-compliant iPhones that include both a minimum standard USB-C port and a fast lightning port, along with a fast lightning cable in the box. 
    forgot usernamewatto_cobraAnilu_777
  • Reply 11 of 43
    While this should satisfy the desire for a universal connector standard, it’s curious as to why Apple would want to limit the new capabilities when it’s so easy to give it full throttle. They actually have to work harder to limit it.  I can’t see how such an artificial limitation is a benefit for Apple’s customers. 
    It probably depends on whether or not they think they can extract a premium to enable the higher data rates.
    williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingammobirdAlex1Nbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 12 of 43
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,181member
    Perhaps it will transfer at USB 2.0 speeds when not connected to a Thunderbolt port.
    forgot usernamewatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 43
    clexmanclexman Posts: 205member
    Name one computing device that comes with the fastest USB-C cable. No phone, tablet, laptop or desktop does. It’s always separate or with a peripheral. 

    This is a charging cable for the >99.9% of iPhone users that make all data transfers wirelessly. 

    The minority that transfer data over a wire from their iPhone can buy a specialty cable for that. 
    williamlondoncitpeksforgot usernameAlex1Nwatto_cobraJapheyAnilu_777aderutterdewmeFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 14 of 43
    nubusnubus Posts: 301member
    ApplePoor said:
    The USB-C transfer rate, I believe, was not a part of the EU dogma. The new phone potentially has a USB-C socket and that is all that was required.
    You're right. EU isn't requiring data transfer to be enabled at all: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:52021PC0547. Apple could deliver data transfer through another interface now or in the future - or not.

    But USB 2.0... a 23 year old standard? The iPhone 15 is not the entry model - SE, 13, and 14 are below the 15.. and 15 will likely be sold for 3 years. It doesn't really matter, as wired data transfer connections are probably mostly used on cars without wireless CarPlay. Perhaps if Apple can reduce the cost of 15. Or if USB 2.0 is for iPhone 14c - and iPhone 15 will get USB 3.x.
    forgot usernameAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 43
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,409member
    ApplePoor said:
    The USB-C transfer rate, I believe, was not a part of the EU dogma. The new phone potentially has a USB-C socket and that is all that was required.

    No, the USB-C standard require at least 15W for recharging but not data speed which can variable since some devices don't need much data.
    Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 43
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,752member
    netrox said:
    ApplePoor said:
    The USB-C transfer rate, I believe, was not a part of the EU dogma. The new phone potentially has a USB-C socket and that is all that was required.

    No, the USB-C standard require at least 15W for recharging but not data speed which can variable since some devices don't need much data.
    That is not true. Use of the connector does not require 15w at all. A fully compliant USB-C socket can provide 500mA @5v (2.5w) or less and does not need to support data at all, whether that be USB 2.0, 3.2 or Thunderbolt. The USB C cables however should all be able to carry 3A, but I doubt many of the eBay/Amazon specials do. Anything claiming to be USB 3.1 compliant however, generally should be able to source at least 900mA @ 5v however.
    edited August 2023 Alex1Nmuthuk_vanalingamdewme
  • Reply 17 of 43
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 1,295member
    Sounds like another reason why I’ll keep my 14 Pro until the 16 Pro debuts next year.
    nubuswilliamlondon
  • Reply 18 of 43
    seankillseankill Posts: 566member
    igorsky said:
    clexman said:
    Pdybman said:
    The EU warned about such shenanigans, so if they do do that, it will be a costly mistake.
    What shenanigans? It says no MFi. 
    Shenanigans = Apple wanting to run it’s business without the EU’s meddling 

    Why are they in favor of big governments? Don’t vote for what you can’t handle.
  • Reply 19 of 43
    Pffff is this news? How low can you go when lacking any relevant new features.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 20 of 43
    charlesncharlesn Posts: 764member
    ctt_zh said:
    charlesn said:
    This sounds very plausibly Apple. I could imagine that Thunderbolt speeds are "available" on the Pro models, but you will need to buy an additional Thunderbotl USB-C cable that supports those speeds to achieve them. It's like wired mode on the $549 Airpods Max which requires an additional $35 cable to use and only Apple sells it. This would, however, be a giant middle finger to EU regulations since the phone's full capabilities couldn't be realized without buying an extra specialized cable, the very thing that the regulations were meant to stop. 
    If Apple is going to give its customers a data transfer experience akin to a budget Android phone unless they buy additional cables, then the giant middle finger really isn't being pointed at the EU...
    LIke I said: $35 cable purchase required to use wired mode on AirPods Max -- so Apple is no stranger to flipping its customers off, even when it comes in with a product like APM that's priced 40% more than Bose's most expensive wireless headphone. And when you're outpricing Bose by that amount, that's saying something. By the way, data transfer speeds with a regular USB-C cable will be no different than Lightning, so "the experience" will be no different except for those buyers who know what transfers over Thunderbolt are like. Also keep in mind that Thunderbolt speeds require Thunderbolt ports on both ends of the transfer. What may soften the blow, no thanks to Apple, is that anyone who uses Thunderbolt regularly likely has an extra cable laying around. 
    Alex1Nwilliamlondonwatto_cobramuthuk_vanalingamMplsP
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