iPad Pro hands on: Luxury technology in an impossibly-thin package

Posted:
in iPad edited May 17

There is a lot that seems impossible about the new iPad Pro, but above all, it's the pinnacle of what Apple's vertical integration can achieve -- with a high price to match.

13-inch iPad Pro with OLED and Nano Texture with a colorful wallpaper
13-inch iPad Pro



There was a point where "pro" on an Apple product meant "best, but still for everyone," and that time may have come to an end. It now translates to something closer to "overkill for your needs, but it looks nice doing it."

As my editor Mike Wuerthele pointed out in his hands on, the iPad Air has created a happy middle ground of compromises with feature sets and price. The iPad Pro has become the luxury edition that serves as a preview of what iPad Air will become in a few years, but pay more, and you'll get it now.



iPad Pro has had an odd evolution since it was first introduced in 2015. The Apple Pencil, Magic Keyboard, flat design, ProMotion, and new display tech all originated with these high-end models.

That trend continues as Apple takes its first non-iPhone to OLED and adds a brand new M4 processor to the mix. Here's what you need to know about the upgrades.

2024 iPad Pro - design



Almost everything is new with the 13-inch iPad Pro that I ordered. It has a thinner body at 5.1 mm, it is lighter at 1.28 pounds, it now has OLED and a Nano Texture option, and it starts at a higher price.

13-inch iPad Pro standing upright with the display facing away, the camera bump is visible
A thinner case, no Ultra Wide Camera, and new magnet arrangement



Dropping the 128GB storage tier was the way to go, but it didn't mean much to me since I tend to buy iPads with 1TB of storage. Like the M1 it replaces, the 13-inch iPad Pro will be my work machine outside of Apple Vision Pro.

The first thing you notice about the new iPad Pro is it feels noticeably lighter and thinner. Impossibly so, as the headline suggests. Your brain just has a moment to think, "Is this it?" every time you pick it up. And don't worry, it won't bend.

Then there's the display. Simply put, OLED is a big finally for the big-screened iPad. Watching movies with inky black scenes is no longer a futile struggle against bloom.

13-inch iPad Pro on a desk next to Apple Pencil. A colorful wallpaper is shown.
OLED makes the blacks deeper and colors pop



The 13-inch iPad Pro has a 2,752 by 2,064 display, which sticks to the usual 264 ppi density. Other than the new 1,000-nit tandem OLED panels, everything else returns, like P3 color, True Tone, and ProMotion.

The thinner design did require one big change -- the magnets. My various magnetic stands will need to be replaced, there is zero compatibility with them. Six years with the same magnets isn't bad though.

There is a lot of discourse around the Nano Texture display, but I'll get to that in a moment.

I also purchased the Magic Keyboard and Apple Pencil Pro (on sale now). Both are an excellent evolution of their product line.

Apple Pencil Pro



The Apple Pencil lineup may be in the middle of a transition, but there is a clear winner with Apple Pencil Pro. It packs even more technology in a case that is identical to the Apple Pencil 2.

Appel Pencil Pro on a black surface
Apple Pencil Pro brings more features to an already magical tool



There is a new squeeze gesture, haptic feedback, and a sensor for barrel roll. It also has a new magnetic charging layout to make space for the landscape-oriented selfie camera and Face ID system.

Using the Apple Pencil Pro to navigate iPadOS feels like a new superpower. You'll have to excuse me because I didn't have access to hover before, but that too adds to the experience.

While holding the Apple Pencil Pro, you can move about the interface and see elements rise up to meet the Pencil before you touch. Grab an element, like a song in a playlist, and move it to feel haptic clicks as it jumps through the list to a new position.

Apple Pencil Pro held above an iPad Pro with Notes open, a tool picker is visible
Squeezing brings up a modal picker in compatible apps



Unlike other "stylus," Apple Pencil Pro feels like a robotic finger more than another way to touch the display. It is responsive and interacts with the software as if it were a physical object, which reminds me a lot of how visionOS works.

When I'm editing photos, the Apple Pencil Pro is indispensable.



For example, in Affinity Designer, as I move through an image with one hand, the Apple Pencil is in the other tapping to remove dust and scratches from something in the image. In this case, M4 seems to make the process faster as it churns through each repair command in a blink.

An Apple Pencil Pro hovering over an iPad display, a shadow is visible of a fountain pen
That's not a real shadow, squint and you'll see the fountain pen rendered as a 3D shadow



One really fun feature brought about by hover but perfected by the squeeze modal that appears is a new tool preview. For example, if you are hovering above the display while a fountain pen is selected, and a 3D render of a pen is visible as a shadow.

It is another example of Apple's magic in its technology.

Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro



The new Magic Keyboard is another achievement from Apple. It is thinner and lighter, but it has a function row and a bigger haptic trackpad.

Apple's updated Magic Keyboard has a function row and larger trackpad
Apple's updated Magic Keyboard has a function row and larger trackpad



The actual keyboard is unchanged. It is still a low-travel chiclet keyboard that is not dissimilar from a MacBook Pro keyboard. The function row is a welcome addition, though it would be nice if Apple let us program some of their functions.

The trackpad no longer has a physical dive board mechanism. Instead, it vibrates to simulate a click. And, like with Apple Pencil Pro, certain UI elements cause a little haptic feedback, like when moving list items.

The aluminum wrist rest makes it look and feel more like a MacBook. It is more premium than the rubbery texture, though that's still there on the outside of the case.

The combined weight of the 13-inch iPad Pro and Magic Keyboard is only about 0.05 pounds heavier than a 13-inch MacBook Air. That makes it finally feel more like the laptop you might replace a Mac with.

Nano Texture isn't for everyone



There will be time for a bigger discussion about Nano Texture, but my initial impressions of the display have been positive. It does indeed cast a slight haze over the display in certain light, especially bright light. But only really from certain angles.

An iPad Pro in a stand with Snoopy on the display
Content looks great when you don't have to worry about reflections or glare



If you view the 13-inch iPad Pro at a normal angle with no lights directly shining on the display, content will look mostly no different than what it would on the glossy panel. In fact, the only way you would know there is a difference in the content is if you're holding the iPads side-by-side.

So, yes, Nano Texture is a trade-off. You'll never get perfect #000000 blacks, but the briefest tinge of gray in that black won't be noticeable, especially in a dim environment.

A small light is shined on two iPad displays, the Nano Texture display diffuses the light, while the glossy display reflects it
Nano Texture OLED versus a glossy M1 iPad Pro display



Shine a light directly on the display, and the Nano Texture becomes a kind of fog. The content is still visible, but the light source is noticeable.

Shine the same light source on a glossy display, and you're left with a blob of light obscuring the display completely. Forget deep blacks -- you won't see anything.

From my testing, content pops off of the OLED display. Colors are saturated and sharp. Text is clear and legible.



It isn't until I pull my M1 iPad Pro with miniLED backlighting next to it that I notice the slight film-like haze over the display. Nano Texture is a trade-off, but I think it is a net positive.

You might lose the tiniest bit of black level, so little that even my picky eye doesn't notice when I'm not looking for it.

Mike's eyes do, though. He doesn't like it at all, he doesn't like the more muted blacks he says, and he hasn't been quiet about it.

But, in return, you get a display that you never, ever have to see your face reflected in ever again. For me, that's a price I'm willing to pay.

M4 - to be determined



As with every new Apple processor, we're going to have to wait and see how developers take advantage of the power. Nothing available today is specifically optimized for the M4.

A bento image showing all of the features introduced by the M4 processor
M4 brings many new features to iPad Pro, including hardware accelerated ray tracing



Running Geekbench 6 locally, it scored 3590 single core and 13353 multi core. The GPU score was 52183.

Compare that to my M1 model, which scored 2395 single-core and 8838 multi-core. The GPU scored 32958.

These are impressive results, but the iPad still runs iPadOS. It has the same App Store filled with apps that don't use that power, as before. All of that is the same, for better or worse.

There are spec upgrades that will make a difference once apps and games are released for them. Hardware accelerated ray tracing and mesh shading are both welcome for improved gaming.

Let's save iPadOS for WWDC



There are significant differences in the hardware when comparing iPad Pro and iPad Air. iPad Pro is like buying a Ferrari. It goes really fast and looks good doing it all the way to the speed limit.

Apple's WWDC 2024 logo. Letters are spelt out in a colorful font with a representation of Apple Park behind them
WWDC is expected to focus on AI features for Apple's platforms



For iPad, the speed limiter is iPadOS. And as amazing as the 13-inch iPad Pro is, and has been, it has always been held back by Apple's software strategy.

That, of course, isn't an original thought, nor is it to say iPad Pro isn't worth a purchase. I fell in love with this device the minute I held it in my hand, but I had a simultaneous realization that my previous iPad Pro with M1 could do everything this one could -- just less pretty.

We'll have plenty of time to discuss iPadOS after we see what Apple has planned for iPadOS 18. This hands on focuses on the hardware and what it brings because iPadOS isn't affected by this upgrade, not yet anyway.

Finding an audience for iPad Pro



I'm a dedicated iPad Pro user, so it is no secret that Apple need only release a new model and I'll be there to check it out. There is rare exception, as I did skip the M2 model due to it not offering anything for my use case.

A book is being pulled from the shelf titled
Apple got one thing right, iPad Pro feels "thinpossible"



There is a lot to love about the 13-inch iPad Pro, like the tandem OLED display and new design. Apple succeeded in creating a new product that checked enough boxes for me to upgrade, but I'm an easy target.

With a 13-inch iPad Air in existence, I want to know who Apple thinks the iPad Pro is really for. Apple has been known to build enthusiast computers for 1% of the market, see also Mac Pro, but iPad Pro seems aimed at a wider market.

Apple hasn't done much to define that market beyond "people with more money that want nicer things." ProMotion, OLED, Thunderbolt, and a fancy new Magic Keyboard are all compelling reasons to buy the 13-inch iPad Pro, but they're all easily overlooked if you're not aware of them before the purchase process.

A close-up shot of the back of an iPad Pro with the Thunderbolt port in view
Thunderbolt in iPad Pro may be enough reason for many to jump from Air



Perhaps it is as simple as the classic price ladder argument. Apple needs a flagship model that feels just out of reach to placate buyers looking at an $800 iPad Air but not so expensive that they wouldn't make the leap to Pro.

iPad Pro also appears to be a test bed for some features, like new Apple Pencil upgrades, display technologies, and stuff like LiDAR. Perhaps we're all looking for something that isn't there, and pro really does just mean "more expensive, but not really professional."

I hope that isn't the case. However, Apple will need to prove this with pro-grade differentiation in feature sets. M4 may be the answer with advanced AI features, but we won't have a preview until June, and know for sure in September or October.

Look for our full review of the 13-inch iPad Pro before WWDC. We'll be doing it again at some point after WWDC, with iPadOS 18 in mind.

Where to buy Apple's M4 iPad Pro



The 2024 iPad Pro M4 is on sale now, with reputable Apple resellers discounting every model in our 11-inch iPad Pro M4 Price Tracker and 13-inch iPad Pro M4 Price Tracker. In the guides, you can compare prices and even set price alerts for the storage capacity and color of your choosing.

At press time, Apple Authorized Reseller Adorama is discounting the new models by up to $100 in addition to bonus savings on AppleCare. To activate the savings, enter promo code APINSIDER during Step 4 of checkout.

There are also blowout iPad deals in effect on last-gen models, including a limited-time $399 iPad Air 5 special.



Read on AppleInsider

Alex1N
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    dee_deedee_dee Posts: 116member
    This isn’t luxury anything until the toddler software is improved. 
    williamlondonneoncatMplsP
  • Reply 2 of 26
    Nano-texture has no negative effect on colors at all. None. Shining lights directly towards the display? That has a negative effect on colors regardless of what you have...matte, laminated or nano-texture. Nano-texture is meant to reduce ambient reflections (like windows behind your display) not act as a shield against light sources pointed at it. 
    iOS_Guy80StrangeDaysAlex1N
  • Reply 3 of 26
    firelockfirelock Posts: 240member
    Nano-texture has no negative effect on colors at all. None. Shining lights directly towards the display? That has a negative effect on colors regardless of what you have...matte, laminated or nano-texture. Nano-texture is meant to reduce ambient reflections (like windows behind your display) not act as a shield against light sources pointed at it. 
    I'm curious how the Apple Pencil performs on the nano-texture surface. Let us know if you have tried it.
  • Reply 4 of 26
    entropysentropys Posts: 4,212member
    Having switched jobs I have less need for an iPad Pro compared with my old job.  The Air was the logical choice, almost the same as my old M2 IPP I had to hand back.  Buuut, I decided on the M4 Pro.  I will keep it a long time.  

    Anyway, very happy with that choice. The screen is a marvel, and the M4 definitely feels snappier than the M2.

     I have a low end 11 inch IPP, Firelock, so shiny screen. And the pencil pro seems like magic. The pencil feels a bit different in the hand to the pencil 2. The pencil 2 had a smooth surface while the pro seems Matt.  The new functions are very user friendly.
    i would assume the nano texture version might be a bit like if you had those anti-glare handwriting screen covers, but less intrusive.
    edited May 17 Alex1NAnilu_777
  • Reply 5 of 26
    iOS_Guy80iOS_Guy80 Posts: 841member
    entropys said:
    Having switched jobs I have less need for an iPad Pro compared with my old job.  The Air was the logical choice, almost the same as my old M2 IPP I had to hand back.  Buuut, I decided on the M4 Pro.  I will keep it a long time.  

    Anyway, very happy with that choice. The screen is a marvel, and the M4 definitely feels snappier than the M2.

     I have a low end 11 inch IPP, Firelock, so shiny screen. And the pencil pro seems like magic. The pencil feels a bit different in the hand to the pencil 2. The pencil 2 had a smooth surface while the pro seems Matt.  The new functions are very user friendly.
    i would assume the nano texture version might be a bit like if you had those anti-glare handwriting screen covers, but less intrusive.
    Liking the M4 chip and thinness of the new Pro also.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 6 of 26
    firelock said:
    Nano-texture has no negative effect on colors at all. None. Shining lights directly towards the display? That has a negative effect on colors regardless of what you have...matte, laminated or nano-texture. Nano-texture is meant to reduce ambient reflections (like windows behind your display) not act as a shield against light sources pointed at it. 
    I'm curious how the Apple Pencil performs on the nano-texture surface. Let us know if you have tried it.
    Same as prior iPad Pro models. The "nano" part means that there isn't a discernible texture. 
    Alex1NAnilu_777
  • Reply 7 of 26
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,067member
    I replaced an OG iPad Pro with the 11" M4. So far I'm quite pleased. My OG model had a folio keyboard. It was a 2nd one, actually, a warranty replacement that also died and became a plain folio cover. It's probably good that they've shelved that design. The Magic Keyboard for the M4 is far more robust and will be much more likely to stand the test of time. That said, despite the description in the review above, I am surprised at its weight. I haven't put it on a scale, but it seems to be about the same as the iPad itself, so coming from the prior folio keyboard this thing is heavy. 
    williamlondondewmeAlex1N
  • Reply 8 of 26
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 1,119member
    Much has been made about the thinness of the new models, but coming from a 10.5” iPad Pro, it doesn’t seem like a big difference, probably due to the rounded edges of the earlier model. The new 11” actually feels a little clunkier to me with its squared edges, and of course not as nice in the hands, but if you’re using it with a keyboard or case, that won’t matter to you. Here’s a photo for comparison.

    williamlondondewmeAlex1NJapheyAnilu_777ravnorodom
  • Reply 9 of 26
    chasmchasm Posts: 3,375member
    dee_dee said:
    This isn’t luxury anything until the toddler software is improved. 
    I use an iPad Pro for (mostly) writing, photo editing, some art creation, Keynote, and a few other things. I pull out my Apple Pencil 2nd gen for some very light sketching and calligraphy.

    In no way whatsoever do I feel the slightest bit constrained by the operating system (not software as you incorrectly called it). Of course, not everyone’s use case is the same — something you’ve overlooked, but then I doubt you’ve even used an iPad, let alone the Pro model — and certainly there are some limitations in iOS and iPadOS compared to macOS under certain circumstances.

    But as far as I can tell, there’s very little to nothing “getting in my way” when using an iPad Pro for the varied tasks I’ve mentioned above. It’s a touch-first device, so it is only a surprise to you (apparently) that this puts different priorities on the OS.

    That said, I’m looking forward to seeing what Apple does with iOS and iPadOS in the fall, and outlines for us at WWDC. As you imply, there’s a lot of potential that could be leveraged, and perhaps the “AI-ification” of both macOS and the other systems will explore some of that potential.

    But I very, very, very much doubt iOS and iPadOS will ever be replaced with macOS as you seem to be suggesting.
    jahbladeStrangeDayswilliamlondondewmeAlex1NmacguiAnilu_777
  • Reply 10 of 26
    daviatordaviator Posts: 9member
    Great review, most of which I agree with (I don’t have nano glass so can’t comment on that.)

    But the first paragraph was confusing, because I don’t think the writer understands the meaning of the phrase “come to pass.”  He seems to think it means “to have passed by” when actually it means “to have come to exist” now, in the present. 

    I THINK he meant to say that the days of the iPad Pro being for everyone are now in the past. But instead he said the opposite. 
    williamlondonAlex1N
  • Reply 11 of 26
    Wesley HilliardWesley Hilliard Posts: 213member, administrator, moderator, editor
    daviator said:
    Great review, most of which I agree with (I don’t have nano glass so can’t comment on that.)

    But the first paragraph was confusing, because I don’t think the writer understands the meaning of the phrase “come to pass.”  He seems to think it means “to have passed by” when actually it means “to have come to exist” now, in the present. 

    I THINK he meant to say that the days of the iPad Pro being for everyone are now in the past. But instead he said the opposite. 
    Ha, you're right. I think the phrase sounded right in my head but reading it now it does convey the opposite. Thanks for the catch.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 12 of 26
    skiwiskiwi Posts: 25member
    One of the reasons for me to upgrade from an iPad Pro M1 would be the keyboard, but there is nothing in this review that shows the keyboard and explains how it is in practice when compared against the old Magic Keyboard. For example, the new function keys, how do they fit under the display - are they hard to reach? Are the keys the same size as the old keyboard? Is the trackpad bigger? Etc etc.
    dewmeAlex1NAnilu_777
  • Reply 13 of 26
    AniMillAniMill Posts: 169member
    I sincerely hope we see a change of heart from Apple with macOS support when attached to the Magic Keyboard. In fact, if the only way we could get macOS “emulation” was we HAD to use only their Magic Keyboard, I’d be fine with that lock-in.

    But perhaps companies like Adobe and Maxon could iPadify more of their desktop apps. 
    williamlondonAlex1Nmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 26
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 1,272member
    FTA:
    One really fun feature brought about by hover but perfected by the squeeze modal that appears is a new tool preview. For example, if you are hovering above the display while a fountain pen is selected, and a 3D render of a pen is visible as a shadow.”

    This is really cool, and a great idea…whoever thought of it. 
    Alex1NAnilu_777
  • Reply 15 of 26
    RigiDigiRigiDigi Posts: 14member
    dee_dee said:
    This isn’t luxury anything until the toddler software is improved. 
    Mixed feelings about this one: have been working with the 13” iPad Pro pretty solidly for the last few days; traded up my iPad Pro 11 2nd Gen & I would have expected that there would have been a significant improvement between the two.

    Not so, really. Vastly overstated and overpriced. There are surprisingly few differences in day-to-day use & this incudes some reasonably cpu-intensive tasks, eg, photo & video editing. Performance difference is ‘slightly’ better; screen difference the same really, noting HDR playback from Apple+, Netflix etc. Slightly better. The single most improved difference is the camera now in landscape, finally, obviously, well overdue. The biggest minus in this respect is the downgrading of the cameras & surprisingly, I really miss the zoom lens.

    The other surprise was in adding ESR’s latest Rebound Keyboard. Has been brilliant & now with a row of function keys. I’d half expected I’d persevere with that for a while then eventually cave in and buy the outrageously expensive new Apple Magic Keyboard. But not so, this ESR device is very, very good & not going anywhere. AUD$113 shipped vs. $AUD$549. A no brainer. Oh, and the balance is much better than Apple when actually used ‘on my lap’ (90% of the time). The Apple is still fwd heavy and overbalances, even more so with the new model which has a steeper angle on the Pad attachment. The ESR also provides a magnetic sleeve with sides protection for the iPad, also missing from Apple. ESR; fast bluetooth, no lag. Yes separate charging.

    Another surprising plus for me is re. the (what I’d also thought) ‘toddler software’ and crippled iPadOS. Not quite so much at all with the Keyboard & which opens up so much extra functionality in this iPad. Now I am able to much more easily, say, access & work with the file system & dirs, ditto for local NAS, Cloud, printing & the rest. Keyboard trackpad & keyboard controls, stage manager & navigating windows etc etc. Very, very surprised with this one & clearly the keyboard brings the iPad alive in ways I hadn’t previously realised. My laptop hasn’t needed to be opened since this arrived (an excellent Ausus touchscreen unit).

    Mind you, I have the feeling that this would have been exactly the same on my previous iPar Pro 11 also running iPadOS 17.5. The biggest difference was the addition of the ESR Keyboard. I’m hoping and expecting that WWWDC & iPadOS 18 will actually begin to truly leverage what might be under the hood here in this very pricey 13” iPad Pro, but do have the feeling it will be more of the same; underwhelming & only marginal improvements. We’ll see.




    edited May 17 williamlondonhexclockAlex1N
  • Reply 16 of 26
    entropysentropys Posts: 4,212member
    AniMill said:
    I sincerely hope we see a change of heart from Apple with macOS support when attached to the Magic Keyboard. In fact, if the only way we could get macOS “emulation” was we HAD to use only their Magic Keyboard, I’d be fine with that lock-in.

    But perhaps companies like Adobe and Maxon could iPadify more of their desktop apps. 
    On my old M2 IPP I would use Citrix to remotely log in and the window is effectively a windows machine. Leaving side the appalling lagginess, you really don’t want to try and use a touch interface on a tablet on apps designed for desktop paradigms. MS office 365, Onenote and SharePoint meant I did not have to use Citrix much at all in recent times. And those apps are designed for the iPad.

    I suspect what people mean when the mean MacOS is easy to use intuitive windowing and multitasking, and a MacOS finder like file system.  All of these have improved with each OS, but there is a way to go yet. And Apple would have to let go of the sandboxed app approach at least for files management
    The other thing would be the ability to have more than one user account, even the ability to have a centralised account setting paradigm that meant the user could just pick up any iPad and log on. Given the price of these things, that would be something worthwhile too, and greatly increase their use in organisations that have a lot of temporary deployments.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 17 of 26
    entropysentropys Posts: 4,212member

    RigiDigi said:
    dee_dee said:
    This isn’t luxury anything until the toddler software is improved. 
    ….
    The other surprise was in adding ESR’s latest Rebound Keyboard. Has been brilliant & now with a row of function keys. I’d half expected I’d persevere with that for a while then eventually cave in and buy the outrageously expensive new Apple Magic Keyboard. But not so, this ESR device is very, very good & not going anywhere. AUD$113 shipped vs. $AUD$549. A no brainer. Oh, and the balance is much better than Apple when actually used ‘on my lap’ (90% of the time). The Apple is still fwd heavy and overbalances, even more so with the new model which has a steeper angle on the Pad attachment. The ESR also provides a magnetic sleeve with sides protection for the iPad, also missing from Apple. ESR; fast bluetooth, no lag. Yes separate charging.


    Mind you, I have the feeling that this would have been exactly the same on my previous iPar Pro 11 also running iPadOS 17.5. The biggest difference was the addition of the ESR Keyboard. I’m hoping and expecting that WWWDC & iPadOS 18 will actually begin to truly leverage what might be under the hood here in this very pricey 13” iPad Pro, but do have the feeling it will be more of the same; underwhelming & only marginal improvements. We’ll see.
    Quite a fan of ESR kit, especially chargers and iPhone cases and the like.
    i wish they made an iPad case which also has a slot for the pencil like the jtech or finti ones. Unfortunately it doesn’t. But other than Apple, ESR seem to the only ones currently available that at least offer some protection for the pencil, a magnetic folding flap. Great when closed up, hopeless when trying to hold the iPad in your right hand in landscape (yep, a lefty). So I settled for an ESR Rebound case (I have no need for a keyboard) and already the pencil has flown off when I tried to type in bed.  I will get the case I like when more widely available in a few weeks.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 18 of 26
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,477member
    chasm said:
    dee_dee said:
    This isn’t luxury anything until the toddler software is improved. 
    I use an iPad Pro for (mostly) writing, photo editing, some art creation, Keynote, and a few other things. I pull out my Apple Pencil 2nd gen for some very light sketching and calligraphy.

    In no way whatsoever do I feel the slightest bit constrained by the operating system (not software as you incorrectly called it). Of course, not everyone’s use case is the same — something you’ve overlooked, but then I doubt you’ve even used an iPad, let alone the Pro model — and certainly there are some limitations in iOS and iPadOS compared to macOS under certain circumstances.

    But as far as I can tell, there’s very little to nothing “getting in my way” when using an iPad Pro for the varied tasks I’ve mentioned above. It’s a touch-first device, so it is only a surprise to you (apparently) that this puts different priorities on the OS.

    That said, I’m looking forward to seeing what Apple does with iOS and iPadOS in the fall, and outlines for us at WWDC. As you imply, there’s a lot of potential that could be leveraged, and perhaps the “AI-ification” of both macOS and the other systems will explore some of that potential.

    But I very, very, very much doubt iOS and iPadOS will ever be replaced with macOS as you seem to be suggesting.
    Very well said. In a world where anyone can purchase a MacBook Pro, an iPad Pro, both, or neither why are we still complaining about the iPad not being functionally equivalent to a MacBook? Apple makes no bones about it, the iPad Pro and MacBook Pro are two different products targeting users with two different sets of user requirements. Two similar but different species. 

    If you adopted a cat you must have wanted a cat. If you adopted a dog you must have wanted a dog. What’s the point of complaining about your cat falling to bark when someone rings the doorbell or your dog not purring when you rub its belly? Your cat has a cat brain and your dog has a dog brain. For sure there are things that are in common between cats and dogs, e.g., eat, sleep, poop. But there are also things that are different, like scratching your sofa legs to shreds versus chewing up your TV remote. Two similar but different species. 

    Apple has never claimed that an iPad Pro is a drop in replacement for a MacBook Pro, or vice versa. Why would we want to create a hybrid iPad/MacBook any more than we’d want a Cog or a Dat? As long as we have the ability/luxury to allow both species to exist simultaneously with their unique qualities, why would we want to force either one to cease to exist? 

    Choice is good for consumers. We now have the luxury to choose exactly what we want from what’s available and purchase the machine that best matches our needs. We can also purchase any other vendors product, like a Surface device which is a hybrid PC and tablet, I.e., a Microsoft Dat or Cog. Bark, purr, bark, purr, poop. 
    cg27williamlondonAlex1N
  • Reply 19 of 26
    Alex1NAlex1N Posts: 139member
    Looks like a big finish, Wes!  :D

    Useful and interesting article :smile: 
  • Reply 20 of 26
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,383member
    skiwi said:
    One of the reasons for me to upgrade from an iPad Pro M1 would be the keyboard, but there is nothing in this review that shows the keyboard and explains how it is in practice when compared against the old Magic Keyboard. For example, the new function keys, how do they fit under the display - are they hard to reach? Are the keys the same size as the old keyboard? Is the trackpad bigger? Etc etc.
    This clearly is a hands-on review and a really good one nonetheless. Maybe you missed this part:

    AI said:
    Look for our full review of the 13-inch iPad Pro before WWDC. We'll be doing it again at some point after WWDC, with iPadOS 18 in mind.
    I look forward to both those.

    A 128GB option for $100-$200 less would have suited be mine. $1000 for an iPad give me big sticker shock. I'm not disputing value as that's relative, just the psychological impact —  :s  — of that number. That would keep me to considering only the 11" version even if that wasn't already my preference. That could change when actually comparing the two at an Apple Store.

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