Leopard system requirements, upgrade options, and discounts

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
As part of its announcements on Tuesday, Apple released its official system requirements for Mac OS X Leopard and the software's associated applications. Meanwhile, upgrade options for recent Mac buyers and other discount details have been published.



Apple has confirmed Leopard's revised system requirements -- which exclude 800MHz G4 Macs -- and were detailed earlier by AppleInsider. They are:



General requirements

A Mac computer with an Intel, PowerPC G5, or PowerPC G4 (867MHz or faster) processor512MB of memoryDVD drive for installation9GB of available disk spaceSome features require a compatible Internet service provider; fees may apply.Some features require Apple's .Mac service; fees apply.

iChat 4.0 requirements

Audio chats require a microphone and a 56-Kbps Internet connection.Video chats require an iSight camera (built-in or external), USB video class (UVC) camera, or FireWire DV camcorder; and 128-Kbps upstream and downstream Internet connection.Photo Booth and backdrop effects require an Intel Core Duo or faster processor.Backdrop effects when using a DV camcorder require fixed focus, exposure, and white balance.Some iChat features offer better performance and quality with higher system capabilities.

Individual Leopard apps

Time Machine requires an additional hard drive (sold separately).Photo Booth requires an iSight camera (built-in or external), USB video class (UVC) camera, or FireWire DV camcorder; and an Intel or PowerPC G5 processor. Backdrop effects require an Intel Core Duo or faster processor. Backdrop effects when using a DV camcorder require fixed focus, exposure, and white balance.Boot Camp requires a Mac with an Intel processor and Windows XP Service Pack 2 or Windows Vista (sold separately).Screen sharing in iChat and in the Finder requires a 128-Kbps Internet connection (300-Kbps recommended).Front Row requires a Mac with built-in IR and an Apple Remote.DVD Player requires a 1.6GHz processor or faster for improved de-interlacing.Developer tools require 1GB of memory and an additional 3GB of available disk space.

Leopard upgrade options



Customers who purchase a qualifying new Macintosh computer on or after October 1, 2007 that does have not Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard included can upgrade to Leopard for $9.95 through Apple's Mac OS X Leopard Up-to-Date Program.



If you purchased multiple qualifying systems on a single invoice, you can either (1) purchase a Single-User Upgrade Kit for each qualifying product, at a cost of US$9.95*; or (2) purchase fewer Single-User Upgrade Kits and request the Right to Copy for the remaining qualifying products.



The maximum number of Up-To-Date packages that can be qualified from one individual appears to be 20.



Discounts on Leopard



Apple is offering Mac OS X Leopard for $129 with free delivery on October 26. However, there are several other online retailers who likely will not charge you sales tax and are also advertising hefty discounts.



For instance, Amazon.com is offering an instant $20 off Leopard, bringing the price down to $109.



MacMall is also offering $20 off the single license ($109) and $10 off the 5-seat family pack ($189). However, presently MacMall's website has the wrong pricing for Leopard and is offering the single license version for $20 off an incorrect retail price of $109, bringing the total down to $89. It's possible that MacMall may honor that price for readers who act quickly but it is not a certainty.



(Update: MacMall has corrected its error, the discounted price is back to $109).
«1345

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 91
    By law, I believe Macmall would be viewed as offering an 'invitation to treat', therefore, they do not have to honour the price.





    Link



    (AI's link wasn't direct)



    Incidentally, earlier on it was already discounted from 129 > 109. Perhaps it wasn't an oversight?



    Peace and God Bless!
  • Reply 2 of 91
    The Apple Store for Education online is quoting me $116 for a single user and $199 for a family pack. I should call MacMall...
  • Reply 3 of 91
    bsenkabsenka Posts: 799member
    Wow. Those are some hefty system requirements. Talk about bloat-ware!
  • Reply 4 of 91
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsenka View Post


    Wow. Those are some hefty system requirements. Talk about bloat-ware!



    Really? I think compared to the competition, it requires less and costs less as well.
  • Reply 5 of 91
    shanmugamshanmugam Posts: 1,200member
    i ordered on amazon
  • Reply 6 of 91
    Well I guess after 5 great years my 800MHz G4 Mac may finally have to be replaced. Too bad I don't have that extra 67MHz lol.
  • Reply 7 of 91
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,647member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsenka View Post


    Wow. Those are some hefty system requirements. Talk about bloat-ware!



    How ancient a machine should new OS versions be expected to support?
  • Reply 8 of 91
    I was thinking about getting a refurbed MBP the new 2.2 models, does anyone know if the $10 upgrade applies to it? If not, I'll probably just wait a few weeks.
  • Reply 9 of 91
    The upgrade option doesn't seem to apply outside the US and Canada.



    For now ??
  • Reply 10 of 91
    pmjoepmjoe Posts: 565member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FlyinRyan View Post


    The Apple Store for Education online is quoting me $116 for a single user and $199 for a family pack. I should call MacMall...



    Yeah, I saw that too. A whopping $13 educational discount. OS X Tiger was something like $69 after the educational discount. Hopefully this is an error on Apple's part.
  • Reply 11 of 91
    Well some phone wrangling with the customer support people, and I was able to get one to send me a rebate form. On it, it just says that the item must be purchased by today, and doesn't mention price. MacMall has updated their price, but the rebate should still work, getting you the $89 price.



    Here is the link to the form:

    http://www.macmall.com/macmall/Rebat...260MacMall.asp
  • Reply 12 of 91
    tbagginstbaggins Posts: 2,306member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    How ancient a machine should new OS versions be expected to support?



    Up to five years old is fair, IMO.



    ...
  • Reply 13 of 91
    [QUOTE]Originally Posted by FlyinRyan View Post

    The Apple Store for Education online is quoting me $116 for a single user and $199 for a family pack. I should call MacMall...

    Yeah, I saw that too. A whopping $13 educational discount. OS X Tiger was something like $69 after the educational discount. Hopefully this is an error on Apple's part.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pmjoe View Post


    Yeah, I saw that too. A whopping $13 educational discount. OS X Tiger was something like $69 after the educational discount. Hopefully this is an error on Apple's part.



    This may help (posted from the earlier Leopard thread):



    RE: Education Discount Pricing Change

    You may still be able to get the old $69 educational discount price for Leopard, but you *need* to call your local Apple educational sales representative. I just did, and got it pre-ordered for $69. The woman I spoke with didn't even know about the $116 pricing for individual students and educators.



    In speaking with my Apple rep, I told her I wouldn't mind the price increase so much...if the *retail* price had also jumped up $47. Then I would understand. This is just a $13 savings over retail...big deal. You can get a better price break buying it retail from MacMall.com for $109 and free shipping right now {EDIT TO ADD: Now Amazon.com, too}



    From my perspective, it just sounded like students and educators were taking somewhat of a hit, regardless of how "great" 10.5 is supposed to be. Let's face it: every OS upgrade has had a lot of time and expense put into it. Again, I wouldn't mind the $116 price tag, if the regular retail price had increased by the same rate proportionally. But it didn't, and that's what didn't sit right with me. Or, just come out and say "no more educator discounts" and be honest about it from the get go. If educators have to pony up more because of the over 300 new great features...why not spread the pain to retail customers too?



    Anyway, if you're an educator or a student, call your Apple Education rep directly and express your feelings about this. You may just get Leopard for $69 after all. Or just go to MacMall (or now Amazon) and save yourself some bucks there!
  • Reply 14 of 91
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by duzledwarf View Post


    Well I guess after 5 great years my 800MHz G4 Mac may finally have to be replaced. Too bad I don't have that extra 67MHz lol.



    The G4 800 has no L3 the 867 and dual 800 does.



    The lack of L3 slows the g4 800 down. Look on ebay for a g4 QS CPU. I got A 867 about a year ago for about $50
  • Reply 15 of 91
    tbagginstbaggins Posts: 2,306member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by FlyinRyan View Post

    The Apple Store for Education online is quoting me $116 for a single user and $199 for a family pack. I should call MacMall...

    Yeah, I saw that too. A whopping $13 educational discount. OS X Tiger was something like $69 after the educational discount. Hopefully this is an error on Apple's part.



    This may help (posted from the earlier Leopard thread):



    RE: Education Discount Pricing Change

    You may still be able to get the old $69 educational discount price for Leopard, but you *need* to call your local Apple educational sales representative. I just did, and got it pre-ordered for $69. The woman I spoke with didn't even know about the $116 pricing for individual students and educators.



    In speaking with my Apple rep, I told her I wouldn't mind the price increase so much...if the *retail* price had also jumped up $47. Then I would understand. This is just a $13 savings over retail...big deal. You can get a better price break buying it retail from MacMall.com for $109 and free shipping right now {EDIT TO ADD: Now Amazon.com, too}



    From my perspective, it just sounded like students and educators were taking somewhat of a hit, regardless of how "great" 10.5 is supposed to be. Let's face it: every OS upgrade has had a lot of time and expense put into it. Again, I wouldn't mind the $116 price tag, if the regular retail price had increased by the same rate proportionally. But it didn't, and that's what didn't sit right with me. Or, just come out and say "no more educator discounts" and be honest about it from the get go. If educators have to pony up more because of the over 300 new great features...why not spread the pain to retail customers too?



    Anyway, if you're an educator or a student, call your Apple Education rep directly and express your feelings about this. You may just get Leopard for $69 after all. Or just go to MacMall (or now Amazon) and save yourself some bucks there!





    Agreed. It is a tad silly when the educational price discount is so weak it can't even match the Amazon price. \



    ...
  • Reply 16 of 91
    My first generation Macbook Pro, that I bought less than 1 and a half year ago, is not even listed on the up-to-date qualifying computers page. Does it mean I can't install leopard, altough I have an Intel processor and 1,5 GB RAM? Can anyone shine a light on this?
  • Reply 17 of 91
    Poor little iBook. I still love you, even if bad old Apple doesn't anymore.
  • Reply 18 of 91
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spellboundxxi View Post


    My first generation Macbook Pro, that I bought less than 1 and a half year ago, is not even listed on the up-to-date qualifying computers page. Does it mean I can't install leopard, altough I have an Intel processor and 1,5 GB RAM? Can anyone shine a light on this?



    You're fine. Any Intel Mac will run Leopard.
  • Reply 19 of 91
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsenka View Post


    Wow. Those are some hefty system requirements. Talk about bloat-ware!



    Nice troll.
  • Reply 20 of 91
    msnlymsnly Posts: 378member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spellboundxxi View Post


    My first generation Macbook Pro, that I bought less than 1 and a half year ago, is not even listed on the up-to-date qualifying computers page. Does it mean I can't install leopard, altough I have an Intel processor and 1,5 GB RAM? Can anyone shine a light on this?







    You have to have been a Windows user at one time... They specs aren't on the Up-To-Date page, thats to see if you get the $9.99 upgrade...







    I have the a 1.2 GHz iBook with 1.25 GB RAM its showing its age, I think I'm upgrading within the next 6 months.
Sign In or Register to comment.