Sony in Blu-ray talks with Apple, Microsoft

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 101
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rain View Post


    Agreed. They even mention that Sony is going up against Apple TV.



    If anyone has a chance of making a comparable device as the AppleTV in ters of sleak design, quality build and company owned internet based store it's Sony. They will lost on the syncing front without any iTunes setup but that won't bother most people and many will prefer the direct network connection that will offer many more codecs than Apple supports.
  • Reply 42 of 101
    winterspanwinterspan Posts: 605member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    In other words?

    Sony wants to deliver Blue-ray Combo Drives that
    • Reads and writes to CD's

    • Reads Blue-ray disk only

    While Apple on the other hand wants a SuperDrive that
    • Reads and writes to CDs

    • Reads and writes to DVDs

    • Reads and writes to Blu-ray disks

    Caw?Caw





    No that doesn't make any sense. The combo drive should be able to read and write CDs and DVD, while only being able to read Bluray. Thats how all the existing computer blu-ray drives on the market work.



    A "superdrive" would read and write all disc formats
  • Reply 43 of 101
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by winterspan View Post


    No that doesn't make any sense. The combo drive should be able to read and write CDs and DVD, while only being able to read Bluray. Thats how all the existing computer blu-ray drives on the market work.



    A "superdrive" would read and write all disc formats



    Thanks for catching my error. It has been corrected to read as follows.



    Sony wants to deliver Blue-ray Combo Drives that

    Reads and writes to CD's

    Reads and writes to Blue-ray disks



    While Apple on the other hand wants a SuperDrive that

    Reads and writes to CDs

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads and writes to Blu-ray disks
  • Reply 44 of 101
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    No doubt a lot of people would also be interested. But not for the same reason considering that the combination would be about 4 times the price of Apple TV now.



    I am sure that an Apple TV with a rewritable CD/DVD/BluRay drive would be cost prohibitive to many if it were introduced today, but as the technology becomes more affordable over the next few years -- and more companies introduce portable laptops sans disc drives -- shouldn't this become an obvious combination?
  • Reply 45 of 101
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elijah M View Post


    I am sure that an Apple TV with a rewritable CD/DVD/BluRay drive would be cost prohibitive to many if it were introduced today, but as the technology becomes more affordable over the next few years -- and more companies introduce portable laptops sans disc drives -- shouldn't this become an obvious combination?



    There is a USB2.0 port that could be made to recognize an Apple branded CD/DVD player or CD/DVD/BD player that sits under the AppleTV with a matching footprint and styling.
  • Reply 46 of 101
    bigalmacbigalmac Posts: 17member
    From way back when Blu-Ray was was being developed, Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) was formed with the following companies on its board. Perhaps those supporters should get 1st option for licensing Blu-Ray.



    This is from the Blu-ray Disc Association website:



    "Blu-ray, also known as Blu-ray Disc (BD), is the name of a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA), a group of the world's leading consumer electronics, personal computer and media manufacturers (including Apple, Dell, Hitachi, HP, JVC, LG, Mitsubishi, Panasonic, Pioneer, Philips, Samsung, Sharp, Sony, TDK and Thomson)."



    Listed alphabetically, Apple is clearly on the list of early supporters. Perhaps they were waiting for the battle to be over before implementing strategies that I'm sure they have been developing in the background.



    A re-write to Final Cut Pro, DVD Studio Pro, iMovie, iDVD & Quicktime would be in order to add Blu-Ray option into the programs.



    Personally I hope it all comes together now that BR has emerged as the winner. However until BR players are adopted by more consumers, offering BR to clients will be limited to the few people who have have upgraded to the new format. It would be interesting to see numbers showing the progress of the format's adoption to the general public.



    Al
  • Reply 47 of 101
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elijah M View Post


    I am sure that an Apple TV with a rewritable CD/DVD/BluRay drive would be cost prohibitive to many if it were introduced today, but as the technology becomes more affordable over the next few years -- and more companies introduce portable laptops sans disc drives -- shouldn't this become an obvious combination?



    It would seem so right now. And it should be in the future?unless something comes about to supersede it by something better and cheaper.
  • Reply 48 of 101
    caliminiuscaliminius Posts: 944member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    Thanks for catching my error. It has been corrected to read as follows.



    Sony wants to deliver Blue-ray Combo Drives that

    Reads and writes to CD's

    Reads and writes to Blue-ray disks



    While Apple on the other hand wants a SuperDrive that

    Reads and writes to CDs

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads and writes to Blu-ray disks



    No I still think you've go it wrong:



    Sony wants to deliver Blue-ray Combo Drives that

    Reads and writes to CD's

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads Blu-ray disks



    While Apple on the other hand wants a SuperDrive that

    Reads and writes to CDs

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads and writes to Blu-ray disks



    I can't imagine any scenario where Sony would be foolish enough to try to offer a drive that couldn't read and write DVDs (well except maybe for a crappy new version of the low end Mac Mini that still can't write DVD's and even then the Sony drive would still have to read DVD's at the minimum).
  • Reply 49 of 101
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by caliminius View Post


    No I still think you've go it wrong:



    Sony wants to deliver Blue-ray Combo Drives that

    Reads and writes to CD's

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads Blu-ray disks



    While Apple on the other hand wants a SuperDrive that

    Reads and writes to CDs

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads and writes to Blu-ray disks



    I can't imagine any scenario where Sony would be foolish enough to try to offer a drive that couldn't read and write DVDs (well except maybe for a crappy new version of the low end Mac Mini that still can't write DVD's and even then the Sony drive would still have to read DVD's at the minimum).



    Sorry. Must have been half asleep. Could have sworn I made the change, but it didn't seem to take,



    Here is the quote from the article.



    People claiming to be familiar with the matter had said that Sony is prepared to deliver Blu-ray Combo Drives capable of reading and writing CD media, but not writing Blu-ray DVD media. Apple, however, is said to have only expressed interest in a SuperDrive variant that could also write Blu-ray discs.



    As such, you read could be right. However, so could the following:



    Sony wants to deliver Blue-ray Combo Drives that

    Reads and writes to CD's

    Reads Blu-ray disks



    While Apple on the other hand wants a SuperDrive that

    Reads and writes to CDs

    Reads and writes to DVDs

    Reads and writes to Blu-ray disks



    In either case, I certainly wouldn't go with Sony's offer. There is not enough media content in Blu-ray to read and won't be for a very long time. If we recall, the LaserDisk format was very prevalent in Japan but never took off in North America or Europe. Remember Laserland.



    I don't know about you, but with Time Capsule now, I can't see myself opting for a Macbook Pro or otherwise with a Blu-ray SuperDrive at the current cost. Rather buy an external. At least, I will then have the option of using it with the other 5 Macs in the house or even lugging it to the studio. Actually, I would probably only bring it home when needed.



    Right now the economics doesn't fit. Rather spend the money on a Mac Mini, two iPhones or three iPod Touches. Heck, even a weekend in Vegas.
  • Reply 50 of 101
    kolchakkolchak Posts: 1,398member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    Right. And right now the cost of a 25gb disk is about $20. You can buy a terabyte Time Capsule for significantly less per gb.



    Like much of your information, this is badly outdated. The cost of BD-R blanks is about half of that. In fact, Circuit City has them on sale for $5 today. Still no match for the cost of DVD-R blanks in GB/$, but less than half the price of Time Capsule in those terms (20¢ per GB BD vs 50$ per GB Time Capsule). Even at regular $10 per disc prices, still better than Time Capsule. Why are you bringing TC into the argument anyway? TC is a backup system. It's not NAS or anything like that. You cannot simply store stuff on it that's not already stored on your computer. If you wanted to make a fair comparison, you'd just pick an external USB or eSATA HD, which is close to that sale price of BD blanks.
  • Reply 51 of 101
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kolchak View Post


    Why are you bringing TC into the argument anyway? TC is a backup system. It's not NAS or anything like that.



    While it is heavily marketed as a backup system, I think it can act as a NAS as well. The AI Time Capsule Q&A page says this: http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...ns.html&page=3



    I think another point might be that one of the reasons to use BR is to write data backups. I think there is some value in that. A hard drive that fails can't be recovered by taking the discs out and putting them in a new drive, whereas, should an optical drive fail, you can still put the disc in another, compatible drive. I think it's a little easier to manage, and I think my most important data can fit on a BD drive. There's the interface question as well, for the long term, the drive interface you used to use for transfers might not be available anymore. A CD written using a SCSI drive can still be read by drives of any interface.
  • Reply 52 of 101
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kolchak View Post


    Like much of your information, this is badly outdated. The cost of BD-R blanks is about half of that. In fact, Circuit City has them on sale for $5 today. Still no match for the cost of DVD-R blanks in GB/$, but less than half the price of Time Capsule in those terms (20¢ per GB BD vs 50$ per GB Time Capsule). Even at regular $10 per disc prices, still better than Time Capsule. Why are you bringing TC into the argument anyway? TC is a backup system. It's not NAS or anything like that. You cannot simply store stuff on it that's not already stored on your computer. If you wanted to make a fair comparison, you'd just pick an external USB or eSATA HD, which is close to that sale price of BD blanks.



    1) To make it fair comparison, minus the price of an AEBS.



    2) You sure can "simply store stuff on it that's not already stored on your computer."
  • Reply 53 of 101
    sennensennen Posts: 1,465member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Megawatt View Post


    This is in response to those who say Blu-Ray is unnecessary. Consumers might not require this feature, but it should definitely be an option for professional video users. I'm in the industry, and 90% of the content we create for our clients is HD video (720p and 1080i currently). Corporate clients already have HD monitors in their boardrooms, and when they're spending thousands of dollars ($30k - $250k) to produce a video, they want the high resolution that Blu-Ray offers to present on their HDTVs as soon as it becomes available. It will be on the Mac Pro towers obviously, but there is a need to have it on the MBP as well, because many freelance video editors use the MBP as their primary workstation. For film work, editors will output their dailies to Blu-Ray for the director to watch at home on their HDTVs.



    definitely.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core


    Right now there isn't a Blu-ray writer that fits the MBP. But you can get an external one. Price, a low $750.



    Unfortunately there are no mac-based B-R authoring tools atm. you can burn files to b-r using toast, that's about it.
  • Reply 54 of 101
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kolchak View Post


    Like much of your information, this is badly outdated. The cost of BD-R blanks is about half of that. In fact, Circuit City has them on sale for $5 today. Still no match for the cost of DVD-R blanks in GB/$, but less than half the price of Time Capsule in those terms (20¢ per GB BD vs 50$ per GB Time Capsule). Even at regular $10 per disc prices, still better than Time Capsule. Why are you bringing TC into the argument anyway? TC is a backup system. It's not NAS or anything like that. You cannot simply store stuff on it that's not already stored on your computer. If you wanted to make a fair comparison, you'd just pick an external USB or eSATA HD, which is close to that sale price of BD blanks.



    Could you supply the link? I couldn't find them at you $5 price. I did find some cheaper ones, but they were not in stock as usual. Make sure they are the newer supercoated versions. Rewritable would also be preferred.



    Most important, redo your math. In addition, I get more functionality with TC and add as many HDs as I want which lowers the storage/gb significantly.



    Why TC? I guess you are not following the story.



    And how would I store something that is not on my computer in the first place?
  • Reply 55 of 101
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sennen View Post


    Unfortunately there are no mac-based B-R authoring tools atm. you can burn files to b-r using toast, that's about it.



    Which is it?



    http://www.mcetech.com/blu-ray/
  • Reply 56 of 101
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    Personally, I hope the "talks" include AppleTV, where a blu-ray drive would be far, far more useful to the average person. And the small loss of download rental fees would be more than offset in the higher hardware sales (both in price and volume).





    I'd like that, too. I don't see the need to watch a blu-ray on my laptop. But I am contemplating an Apple TV. I just upgraded from a Core Duo 1.83 MBP to the 2.4 MBP, and an Apple TV right now would drive the wife bananas. If I stretch it out a bit, say mid-summer, maybe Apple will decide to take the combo BR drives from Sony and squash them into the Apple TV. Probably not, but that would be great.
  • Reply 57 of 101
    royboyroyboy Posts: 447member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by technohermit View Post


    I'd like that, too. I don't see the need to watch a blu-ray on my laptop. But I am contemplating an Apple TV. I just upgraded from a Core Duo 1.83 MBP to the 2.4 MBP, and an Apple TV right now would drive the wife bananas. If I stretch it out a bit, say mid-summer, maybe Apple will decide to take the combo BR drives from Sony and squash them into the Apple TV. Probably not, but that would be great.





    But why would Jobs put a Blu-Ray drive or any kind of DVD drive in Apple TV when he want you to rents movies on-line from ITunes?
  • Reply 58 of 101
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Royboy View Post


    But why would Jobs put a Blu-Ray drive or any kind of DVD drive in Apple TV when he want you to rents movies on-line from ITunes?





    1) Appealing to people who own BR discs.

    2) Bandwidth. Although iTunes supplies DVD-quality with good compression, not everyone has the network speeds to utilize it.

    3) People who have existing DVD players could then ditch the DVD player, for their new Apple TV.

    4) Abandon the mac mini, and create a real mid-range desktop



    I would think that a BR combo drive still plays (and up-converts) older DVD's, no? That would mean the PS3 doesn't either? Hard to believe.



    Edit: Also, I think by now everyone understands that Apple loves to make cash on hardware. The more appealing to the masses, the more they sell. You can't rent from Apple TV if you don't own one. And people who don't own one probably have DVDs. They would be more inclined to buy one, and later rent from it, if it was "backwards compatible" with their existing collections.
  • Reply 59 of 101
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    Everybody on here who's been stating that Apple laptops and computers would not have nor need Blu- ray drives can now begin to eat crow- in huge portions.





    As an example on my Hp Dv9700t a blu-ray drive is a 275.00 upgrade. In the Apple world that will be a 500.00 upgrade. Just not going to happen until prices come way down. We are talking about a company that is always behind the curve when it comes to hardware compared to Windows systems.



    They can't even manage a simple ATSC/NTSC tuner in any of their systems, yet you expect them to drop in a blu-ray drive. Yeah thats going to happen.



    Like someone else pointed out maybe they should work on a system that can actually hold a decent internet connection first.
  • Reply 60 of 101
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    With its victory last month in the high-definition DVD format war, Sony is now said to be entertaining talks with rivals Apple and Microsoft over supplying its Blu-ray drives for future generations of the pair's electronics devices...........................




    Why is Apple suddenly a Rival to Blu Ray? Apple was one of the first on board of the Blu Ray consortium.
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