Complexity of Apple retail stores revealed by permits

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
(ifoAppleStore) The complexity of an Apple store is visible to visitors, but beneath the structure of stainless steel, glass and stone is another level of complexity that is just as important. City permit records show that the electrical, plumbing and other systems inside the retail outlets are extensive -- and expensive.



For instance, the new Boylston Street (Boston) store has 550 lighting fixtures, 224 electrical receptacles and 25 switched outlets, consuming a maximum of 1,200 amps, according to the permits. That’s enough current to power 12 average-sized homes.



The store also has 17 motors for various air conditioning and elevator operations, and a 200 KVA gas-fired generator to supply electricity if the utility power fails. Meanwhile, the fire alarm system consists of 97 different detection and initiating devices, and has 37 alarms to alert the public.



Additionally, city permits show the store to have 51 security devices, 94 data outlets and 90 "telecommunications" devices. In total, Boylston Street store's electrical installation is valued at $971,000, according to an application filed Apple to allow contractors to perform the electrical work.



The store’s plumbing is equally complex: three water closets, one kitchen sink and four lavatories in the basement, along with one hot water heater, slop sink, one urinal and one drinking fountain. Two boilers in the basement connect to the HVAC system, supplying a maximum of 1*million BTUs, a measure of the system’s capacity to heat or cool.



The store’s video surveillance system uses 36 cameras, according to the documents, which safeguard both the store’s public and non-public areas.



Even the work permits themselves came with a high pricetag: $11,590 for the permit covering the installation of temporary electrical service during construction, and $80,900 for the permanent electrical work permit. The closed-circuit TV permit was $20,700, the plumbing permit $17,000, and the gas fitting permit $12,000.



Apple's latest flagship shop on Boylston Street in Boston, Mass.



Overall, some estimates put the total cost of the Boylston Street store at nearly $6 million, including $236,000 to demolish the original building on the site.



Gary Allen is the creator and author of ifo Apple Store, which provides close watch of Apple's retail initiative. When Gary isn't busy publishing news and information on Apple's latest retail stores, he finds himself hanging out at one.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    Hot Water Heater hmmmm
  • Reply 2 of 27
    mchumanmchuman Posts: 154member
    the apple logo appears to be leaning to the left in that photo.
  • Reply 3 of 27
    nofeernofeer Posts: 2,422member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jlrcasanova View Post


    Hot Water Heater hmmmm





    iWater, iHot, iLeak
  • Reply 4 of 27
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,394member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jlrcasanova View Post


    Hot Water Heater hmmmm



    Jobs is gonna intro the iWuvHotWater at WWDC!
  • Reply 5 of 27
    This just shows once again how out of control the govt has gotten when you look at the cost of just the permits for this store. Completely unjustified.
  • Reply 6 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sawdustman View Post


    This just shows once again how out of control the govt has gotten when you look at the cost of just the permits for this store. Completely unjustified.



    Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.
  • Reply 7 of 27
    freethinkerfreethinker Posts: 121member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by der passant View Post


    Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.





    An all glass facade is just perfect in a 7.8 mag earthquake. Couldn't be in a safer spot then Apple Store Boyleston during that kinda quake!
  • Reply 8 of 27
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,152member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by der passant View Post


    Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.



    Note that the permit are not related to the structural system. The permit covers the electrical and mechanical work which is not related to the building ability to withstand earthquakes and/or wind forces.



    However, the fees are justified. The fees are mainly related to public health and safety. The city have to make sure that the build can get the required power, water supply, and sewer drainage. The city also have to make sure that all fire safety equipments are correct and as per design standards and drawings. This is not an easy job and I know that because I am a structural engineer and work on construction projects for a living.
  • Reply 9 of 27
    nasseraenasserae Posts: 3,152member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by freethinker View Post


    An all glass facade is just perfect in a 7.8 mag earthquake. Couldn't be in a safer spot then Apple Store Boyleston during that kinda quake!



    Glass can be engineering to withstand large lateral movement such as the movement experienced during an earthquake.
  • Reply 10 of 27
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post


    However, the fees are justified. The fees are mainly related to public health and safety. The city have to make sure that the build can get the required power, water supply, and sewer drainage. The city also have to make sure that all fire safety equipments are correct and as per design standards and drawings. This is not an easy job and I know that because I am a structural engineer and work on construction projects for a living.



    Yeah and that is just the above board fees. Can you imagine how much it actually costs to get everything signed off on? There's the greens fees, the dinners and the bottles of liquor. Heck you even have to pay people to make sure you don't get a $500 parking ticket. You cant park a construction truck on the street downtown, what are you crazy?
  • Reply 11 of 27
    icarbonicarbon Posts: 196member
    umm... how is this newsworthy?



    is it out of line with nearby retailers?



    is it an unusual level of power consumption?



    or is it just typical building codes for a retail outlet of that size?



    I have no idea, anyone have more of a clue?
  • Reply 12 of 27
    zanshinzanshin Posts: 350member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by McHuman View Post


    the apple logo appears to be leaning to the left in that photo.



    You can thank Steve and his buddy Al Gore for Apple's left-leaning.

  • Reply 13 of 27
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,742member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iCarbon View Post


    umm... how is this newsworthy?



    is it out of line with nearby retailers?



    is it an unusual level of power consumption?



    or is it just typical building codes for a retail outlet of that size?



    I have no idea, anyone have more of a clue?



    Yeah, I'm with you on this one. While I am certain that this is beyond the average for retail buildings of the same size, you wouldnt expect department stores to have the same power and cooling requirements...



    I guess the point is, assuming that this store is outfitted above the average even for giant electronics stores, that Apple/Jobs are leaving nothing to chance--going for the top dollar experrience and assuring that whatever they want to do in the fuure, they have the capacity for it. This makes sense as it is the image they have been cultivating for some time now...
  • Reply 14 of 27
    buckbuck Posts: 293member
    What's the difference between a water closet and a lavatory?

    Also, I don't find its power consumption (eq. 14 homes) all that unusual.
  • Reply 15 of 27
    marktrekmarktrek Posts: 68member
    Solar Panels.

    It is green, will help keep Apple costs down in the future and is good PR.
  • Reply 16 of 27
    citycity Posts: 522member
    As with any religious organizations, such a beautiful structure is inspired from above and a necessity for followers to worship.
  • Reply 17 of 27
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,742member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by city View Post


    As with any religious organizations, such a beautiful structure is inspired from above and a necessity for followers to worship.





    Ok, that is what I wanted to say! Damn.
  • Reply 18 of 27
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 909member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by der passant View Post


    Those fees are typical and ensure the building is inspected and built to code. The reason for building codes and permits is to avoid what we just saw in China. School buildings built on the cheap which collapsed during the earth quake even though they were supposed to be designed and build to withstand them. Had they been inspected and built correctly there would be fewer grieving parents in CHina.



    The buildings in China were built by the government. Why do you think they are not allowing aid to the hardest hit areas? They do not want the outside world to see just how bad things are there. \
  • Reply 19 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Buck View Post


    What's the difference between a water closet and a lavatory?

    Also, I don't find its power consumption (eq. 14 homes) all that unusual.



    The Lavatory is the sink and the water closet is the toilet.



    As an Architect, I'll point out that ALL plumbing, electrical and HVAC require extensive permits and likely is no Less complicated than what they are reading about here.
  • Reply 20 of 27
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by roehlstation View Post


    The Lavatory is the sink and the water closet is the toilet.



    As an Architect, I'll point out that ALL plumbing, electrical and HVAC require extensive permits and likely is no Less complicated than what they are reading about here.



    That's just bizarre. In most English speaking countries the Lavatory is the toilet. I just can't imagine washing my face in the lavatory. Each to their own though.
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