Apple's iWork suite rumored to go web-based

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Apple may build on its success in delivering web-based applications for its .Mac internet service by taking its iWork productivity suite of applications online as early as next week's Macworld Expo.



A new report suggests that the trio of applications -- Pages, Keynote, and Numbers -- will be reintroduced as web applications, similar to the company's .Mac Web Gallery application that was built using SproutCore.



SproutCore is an open source, platform-independent, Cocoa-inspired JavaScript framework for creating web applications that look and feel like Desktop applications. When combined with HTML5's standard offline data storage technologies, the framework is capable of delivering a first-class user experience with exceptional performance.



During a private session at this year's Worldwide Developers Conference titled "Building Native Look-and-Feel Web Applications Using SproutCore," Apple revealed that the framework played a critical role in the development of each of the apps that comprise its online suite of Web-based MobileMe applications.



In its report on the matter, AppleInsider noted that: "Using SproutCore enabled Apple to deliver a new suite of online apps in MobileMe for a cross platform audience. The natural next step will be to expand those offerings to include others, for example, iWork productivity apps."



Because SproutCore is offered under the open source MIT license, anyone can use it to develop their own highly responsive web apps. It's also believed that Apple will at some point invite third parties to deliver their own MobileMe applications, either included as part of the subscription service, or with their own nominal fee.



Such a move would mirror the company's efforts in creating a mobile software market for the iPhone Apps Store.

«134

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 75
    Please describe Apple's "success in delivering web-based applications."



    MobileMe has had its fair share of problems, and while Apple has continued to iron out the issues, I would hardly call their delivery a success.
  • Reply 2 of 75
    Not liking this idea.
  • Reply 3 of 75
    feynmanfeynman Posts: 1,087member
    This would be bad.



    Maybe if they make it so the files can be easily viewed on the web.



    That would be good.
  • Reply 4 of 75
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Not liking this idea.



    I love the idea. I think one of MobileMe's downfalls is that it doesn't have iWork built in. My interest in the idea assumes that Apple will ALSO keep the local versions of iWork up-to-date, but AI's use of "reintroduce" does shy away from that.



    I'd like to be able to put documents in my iDisk folder that I can access at any time. Or more specifically, go to Get Info on any iWork viewable file and click the box to sync with MobileMe without having to specifically have to place in a specific folder the way iDisk currently works.
  • Reply 5 of 75
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    It would be a neat additional service, but iWork can get a bit clunky enough as it is, even when pre-scaling images and such so they're close 300 dpi for print. As a web app? No thanks! solipsism's suggestion does sound interesting, then it's more network storage than a network app.
  • Reply 6 of 75
    I just don't see this as any way possible. I couldn't see using Keynote as a web application. My system doesn't like it much when I use my 2 gig keynote presentation as it is. I couldn't imagine trying to add high def video and all that via a web application. If I have a 2 gig video clip I want to show, think of how long it would take to upload that. I don't see it.
  • Reply 7 of 75
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I love the idea. I think one of MobileMe's downfalls is that it doesn't have iWork built in. My interest in the idea assumes that Apple will ALSO keep the local versions of iWork up-to-date, but AI's use of "reintroduce" does shy away from that.



    I'd like to be able to put documents in my iDisk folder that I can access at any time. Or more specifically, go to Get Info on any iWork viewable file and click the box to sync with MobileMe without having to specifically have to place in a specific folder the way iDisk currently works.



    There are some limited aspects that are interesting, but nearly every web app I've dealt with has been underpowered, difficult to deal with (due to lag) and not my cup of tea.
  • Reply 8 of 75
    My problem with web apps that you pay for is that I fear I would be locked into a subscription plan, where the program gets updated whether you like it or not. And, say you don't want to continue paying for the App, then you lose access to the app. I don't want subscription plans out the ying yang in my life. If anything, I want less subscription plans.
  • Reply 9 of 75
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    This seems to be opposite to Google, who use the web to prototype, and then write native versions if successful.



    Personally I prefer data in the cloud but apps on the client, because clients can vary so greatly (e.g. Mac vs iPhone) it makes sense to write for the native platform. Unless it is the kind of app that is essentially the same on any device in which case a generic platform such as the web could save money.



    But then you could probably save similar money by putting all the non platform specific code in a reusable library and recompiling it for each client, and then have the benefit of native snap. Why do we need this web thingy again?
  • Reply 10 of 75
    Another problem with these "cloud" apps... if you have no net access, you're out of luck. Several power outages recently have really brought that home for me.
  • Reply 11 of 75
    What I like most about this plan is the slowness, unreliability, and limited feature-set of web apps!!! Thank you, Apple, for giving us what we really want!
  • Reply 12 of 75
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shoewee View Post


    I just don't see this as any way possible. I couldn't see using Keynote as a web application. My system doesn't like it much when I use my 2 gig keynote presentation as it is. I couldn't imagine trying to add high def video and all that via a web application. If I have a 2 gig video clip I want to show, think of how long it would take to upload that. I don't see it.



    Its already been done. While there are always going to be some performance limitations. Web apps are becoming more usable for the majority of tasks.



    GoogleDocs is being increasingly used by enterprises.



    I will be curious to see how their implementation compares with 280slides.



    Also these web apps are dependent upon the next generation of JavaScript engines for performance.



    Although Phil will be demoing Leopard, I doubt he will be showing iWork online until WWDC.
  • Reply 13 of 75
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stangmatt66 View Post


    Please describe Apple's "success in delivering web-based applications." ....



    Yeah, it's a bit of a picky point, but it's true.



    It's not really fair to say Apple is anything close to "successful" at it's web-based efforts (unless you include the iTunes store in that mix). As a .Mac user since day one, I would put it somewhere between "adequate" and "barely functional."



    Apple has also consistently talked up the idea of web-based everything but delivered something like 1% of what they talked about, so there is a bit of a credibility gap here when they talk this topic up. We are still waiting for the announced functionality of MobileMe to be fully implemented a year later remember, and the majority of what was promised was only finally delivered about a week and a half ago.



    Personally, in terms of iWork, I would rather they focus on the product they already have. With the last revision, the apps came within a hairsbreadth of being solid competition for Office. With just a few more features they could function as a complete replacement. It would be a shame if by making a sub-set of that functionality available on the web, they end up taking a step backwards for the whole suite. If they have been focussed on making these apps 64 bit for Snow Leopard as well as web-enabled for Mobileme, I doubt they've had the time to actually add to the basic functionality of them at the same time.
  • Reply 14 of 75
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shoewee View Post


    I just don't see this as any way possible. I couldn't see using Keynote as a web application. My system doesn't like it much when I use my 2 gig keynote presentation as it is. I couldn't imagine trying to add high def video and all that via a web application. If I have a 2 gig video clip I want to show, think of how long it would take to upload that. I don't see it.



    If you have a 2Gig video clip that you are trying to include in presentation software (Keynote or PowerPoint), then you simply don't know what you are doing. You should consider yourself lucky that you tied your shoelaces right in the morning and call it a day.
  • Reply 15 of 75
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post


    Its already been done.

    Although Phil will be demoing Leopard, I doubt he will be showing iWork online until WWDC.



    Where'd WWDC come from.



    http://9to5mac.com/iwork-going-cloud



    It's supposed to be a Macworld announcement.



    Frankly, I welcome online access to iWork but if they intend to take it web app only then i've purchased my first and last copy of iWork.



    I'll continue along my path and replace iWork with 3rd party apps when they offer a superior solution



    I'm ok with the "Cloud" as an addendum to standard desktop computing.
  • Reply 16 of 75
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,830member
    Who at Apple is setting the priorities for application development? That person needs to be fired.



    The Mac platform is crying out for a proper sales management program (like ACT or Goldmine on the PC.)



    Daylite and Contactizer don't cut it and Redlien seems all but abandoned.

    Filemaker doesn't (yet) hook into AB and iCal.



    If Apple is going to build a quality app that links into the cloud, fills a need on the platform and brings switchers over from the dark side, this is it.



    Why did Apple build a whole machine (MacBook Air) just for mobile salespeople? Did anyone really ask for a mobile version of iWork?
  • Reply 17 of 75
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post


    Who at Apple is setting the priorities for application development? That person needs to be fired.




    The scary part about this is that software is supposedly Apple's Forte. They've made some curious decisions lately.



    1. Letting Filemaker ship Bento when we all know it should have been part of iWork.

    2. Final Cut Server? I've yet to find many online many people even using the product.

    3. Missing apps- There are 50 fckuking million notetaking apps but the CRM field is a mess. Apple has no Drawing/Painting app even at iLife level.



    I realize that Apple's had to focus on the iPhone but jeezus man the only people I hear ranting about the "Cloud" are wannabe Web 2.0 mavens and other snake oil marketers.



    I think the typical computer user wants applications tailored to the job. They want responsive applications that are highly available and intuitive and automated to varying extent.



    I don't see the Cloud usurping the desktop but rather the augmentation of current desktop apps with web based service. Try to find 5 popular web services that don't have a desktop front end.



    Gmail- covered in multiple ways

    Flikr- a million exporters in apps

    Twitter- plenty of clients



    People don't want to go web only. They want their data to be accessible but the creation of that data is most comfortable using standard desktop app metaphor IMO and I think others would agree.
  • Reply 18 of 75
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stangmatt66 View Post


    Please describe Apple's "success in delivering web-based applications."



    MobileMe has had its fair share of problems, and while Apple has continued to iron out the issues, I would hardly call their delivery a success.



    My thoughts exactly! If MobileMe is setting the bar for what success is for Apple, then I'm very, very concerned for their future should any real competition (ie, not MS) come along one day.
  • Reply 19 of 75
    irelandireland Posts: 17,737member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Not liking this idea.



    I agree. Mobile me is not working properly now even. What they really need to do with Mobile is make it a free service. Would actually be a good business move. All automatic and free.
  • Reply 20 of 75
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post


    Who at Apple is setting the priorities for application development? That person needs to be fired.



    The Mac platform is crying out for a proper sales management program (like ACT or Goldmine on the PC.)...



    http://www.highrisehq.com/
Sign In or Register to comment.