While 91% of Apple users run iOS 7, five different versions of Android hold 10%+ share

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  • Reply 81 of 184
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    philboogie wrote: »
    87.8% of all statistics are made up!

    And the other 26% are just plain wrong!

    (>_<)
  • Reply 82 of 184
    The Android pie chart reminds me of the spinning beach ball on my Mac
  • Reply 83 of 184
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    nht wrote: »
    No, he's saying the exact opposite.  I agree with him...fragmentation today under 4.x is a lot better than it was 2.x.  Targeting for Jelly Bean 4.2 captures the majority of the US market and still leaves you with a fairly recent API stack to work with.

    Apps under 5.x may require some retooling but probably not much more than iOS 7 did.

    The exact opposite would be that the newer APIs in Android could easily be used, but they can't because most devices will never get the latest updates which means developers will have to continually shoot for the least common denominator by sticking with the APIs for the OS version with the most users.

    dasanman69 wrote: »
    How so if the the problem for both is the same (missing features) solution for both is the same (buy new hardware)?

    Your definition states that any evolution of OS or HW changes causes fragmentation. That's now even close to what is meant by a fragmentation when it comes to developers. Fragmentation is where they have to make a demarcation point for support. With a new Android app that probably means not supporting anything below Ice Cream Sandwich or using APIs above Ice Cream Sandwich. That's fragmentation! On top of that Android is also disjointed because there are new devices coming out that may or may not have the latest OS as well as may or may not have suitable performance for your app. Think of iOS as a single platform; every year you have a newer, faster device with a newer OS number which includes new APIs. Is a cake walk for developers in comparison to this disjointed fragmentation of Android.

    gatorguy wrote: »
    Sorry Soli. Just saw this post so I wasn't ignoring you.

    I'm not really clear on what point you're trying to make. Google obviously has no control over what Amazon chooses to do with their own Android-based OS build. GOOG committed to AOSP long ago and to their credit still contribute to and maintain it even tho Amazon, Nokia and others who use it for commercial benefit aren't contributing back to it. Are you perhaps saying Google should never have open-sourced any part of the OS and blocked any efforts for others to commercially use it in any way? Or are you proposing that Google help Amazon in developing and maintaining a highly-customized and modified fork of Android that serves only Amazon's purposes? I don't think Amazon even acknowledges that their OS is Android-based, nor how much of Android remains in it.

    I'm a bit confused as to what you're trying to say.

    Sure they do. Google didn't have to call both version of Android by the same name (Apple used Darwin for their open source OS X foundation). They didn't have to make it so devices of different sizes only fit into one of four categories or overlap thus making the values obscure. Google didn't have to use the same common name for multiple API levels or multiple common names for the same primary version number. Either through a choice to obfuscate the truth and/or from poor planning this is all Google's fault.

    deepen03 wrote: »
    oh so explain Siri then? Why can't an iPhone 4 or iPad 2 run Siri? Siri is a SOFTWARE that runs off of a server. It requires no new hardware to run.

    1) Perspective is a good start, like [@]Tallest Skil[/@]. Have you even considered what would have happened to the Siri HW network and HW servers had every single iPhone that could get iOS 4.0 been allowed to access Siri? They had enough problems with it with just the iPhone 4 using it on opening weekend. Your claims of HW are foolishly limited to the iDevice you hold in your hand without any consideration for the many, many years Apple has been selling iDevices.

    2) As far as I know we live in a technological age where all SW runs on HW. Maybe one day Siri won't have to use an iPhone's HW microphone which will then process the audio using other on-baord HW into a file(s) then send it using the network HW across multiple ISP network HW to an Apple server which will then process the audio on its HW before sending it back to you over the same or similar channels to show up on your HW display and/or as audio out of your HW speaker but that hasn't yet happened.
  • Reply 84 of 184
    What I fail to understand how 8% of IOS is on IOS 8, developers don't make that much, 5% maybe, there is no public beta, even then it would be 20% like android top precentages, and surely I though hack community would only make 1%?
  • Reply 85 of 184
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    What I fail to understand how 8% of IOS is on IOS 8, developers don't make that much, 5% maybe, there is no public beta, even then it would be 20% like android top precentages, and surely I though hack community would only make 1%?

    On top of that every iOS betas needs to have the UDID of the device added to the developer's account or you'll never be able to use it once you install it. However, each developer account has 100(?) devices they can activate to allow others to install the betas. I paid for both iOS and Mac developer accounts and have added family and friend UDIDs to my account, as well as uploaded the needed IPSWs to Dropbox so they can get use the betas.
  • Reply 86 of 184

    And obvious by sales numbers that consumers do not care.

  • Reply 87 of 184

    And this article says what about the OSs exactly? Android have widgets, notifications, can send any attachments in mail messages, can charge in any micro usb and lot lot of features since version 2, things that not even today Apple iOS/iPhone have!

    I am a programmer I know the API differences about the different OSs versions but I don't understand all this hype, and by the way, Apple iOS is not the same on every iPhone, even with the same version number there's plenty of features not available in different iPhones, iPads. The same happens on Android, call it API number or OS version.

  • Reply 88 of 184
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,617member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Sure they do. Google didn't have to call both version of Android by the same name (Apple used Darwin for their open source OS X foundation). They didn't have to make it so devices of different sizes only fit into one of four categories or overlap thus making the values obscure. Google didn't have to use the same common name for multiple API levels or multiple common names for the same primary version number.

    Sol, doesn't Google call the non-Google Android version AOSP? Some reporters, bloggers and forum commenters are the ones lazily referring to every flavor and fork as "Android". You know as well as I do that when Google reports numbers it's Google-Android numbers. They don't lump in Amazon Kindles and Nokia X's.

    Still no idea what you mean about multiple common names for the same version number either. I don't know of any other name for Android 2.3 than Gingerbread, or any name other than Kit-Kat for Android 4.4. Hardly confusing to me and I'm surprised you're having trouble with the names or think it's some devious plan to hide. . . um. . . what exactly?

    On the grouping of screen sizes how is that supposed to be allowing Google to obscure the truth. The truth about what? The categories are referenced in help pages meant to assist developers. They're not in marketing packets for the press.
  • Reply 89 of 184
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Sol, doesn't Google call the non-Google Android version AOSP? Some reporters, bloggers and forum commenters are the ones lazily referring to every flavor and fork as "Android". You know as well as I do that when Google reports numbers it's Google-Android numbers. They don't lump in Amazon Kindles and Nokia X's.

    Still no idea what you mean about multiple common names for the same version number either. I don't know of any other name for Android 2.3 than Gingerbread, or any name other than Kit-Kat for Android 4.4. Hardly confusing to me and I'm surprised you're having trouble with the names or think it's some devious plan to hide. . . um. . . what exactly?

    On the grouping of screen sizes how is that supposed to be allowing Google to obscure the truth. The truth about what? The categories are referenced in help pages meant to assist developers. They're not in marketing packets for the press.

    https://source.android.com/
  • Reply 90 of 184
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,617member
    dasanman69 wrote: »

    Hey thanks for that. I need to get out more.
  • Reply 91 of 184
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,293member
    The problem isn't just the lowest common OS denominator with Android, it's that you can't even ensure that the standard API will work on all devices ( I've seen cases where the external SDK which reads SD cards fails). What most serious dev agencies do is target the top 20 devices. That mostly works. If however there is even more churn in that market - if Samsung loses dominance - it could be a total zoo.
  • Reply 92 of 184
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,293member
    What's all the claptrap about SIRI. Siri isn't an API, it has no SDK. It's a system feature. Nothing to do with the kind of fragmentation which affects devs.
  • Reply 93 of 184
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    saltwater wrote: »
    And this article says what about the OSs exactly? Android have widgets, notifications, can send any attachments in mail messages, can charge in any micro usb and lot lot of features since version 2, things that not even today Apple iOS/iPhone have!
    I am a programmer I know the API differences about the different OSs versions but I don't understand all this hype, and by the way, Apple iOS is not the same on every iPhone, even with the same version number there's plenty of features not available in different iPhones, iPads. The same happens on Android, call it API number or OS version.

    I think you're preaching to the wrong choir.
  • Reply 94 of 184
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post





    It's not all that hard for developers. It's more of a mythical talking point anymore.

     

    HAHAHHAHA. 

     

    Sorry. No.

     

    -Actual Developer. 

  • Reply 95 of 184
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SaltWater View Post

     

    And this article says what about the OSs exactly? Android have widgets, notifications, can send any attachments in mail messages, can charge in any micro usb and lot lot of features since version 2, things that not even today Apple iOS/iPhone have!

    I am a programmer I know the API differences about the different OSs versions but I don't understand all this hype, and by the way, Apple iOS is not the same on every iPhone, even with the same version number there's plenty of features not available in different iPhones, iPads. The same happens on Android, call it API number or OS version.




    We get it. You don't understand the differences at all. That's ok. Plenty of people don't.

  • Reply 96 of 184
    I'll never understand why this concerns the I faithful so much? Seriously, is it just to make yourselves feel better about being on "Team Apple"? We get it, you don't like Google. But good gawd, give it a rest. You make it seem like a phone won't work anymore because it is running an older version of the platform.
    News flash, if this is a big concern for the buyer, they have options with Android. They can buy a Nexus device or they can buy a Google Play Edition phone.
  • Reply 97 of 184
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,438member
    lloydbm4 wrote: »
    I'll never understand why this concerns the I faithful so much? Seriously, is it just to make yourselves feel better about being on "Team Apple"? We get it, you don't like Google. But good gawd, give it a rest. You make it seem like a phone won't work anymore because it is running an older version of the platform.
    News flash, if this is a big concern for the buyer, they have options with Android. They can buy a Nexus device or they can buy a Google Play Edition phone.

    What is the advantage for the user? Are these updates by Google, meaning the user doesn't have to wait for their telco to release an update? Tnx
  • Reply 98 of 184
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

     

    The miserable operating system known as Android is only getting worse and worse.

     

    Only around a fifth of Android users are on the latest version. In 2013, about a third of Android users were on the latest version. It's actually going down!

     

    That figure is actually going down as more and more poor people are flocking to Android as Android continues to be adopted by certain users in very poor countries, also known as "developing" countries, or basically the third world, as I prefer to call it. And for those who are offended my by factual statement, I will of course provide proof for these ignorant people.

     

    OpenSignal’s data indicates that over a third (35 percent) of Android devices in countries with GDP/capita of greater than $20,000 are on the latest version of Android vs just 12 percent in less economically developed countries.

     

     

    Android fragmentation or diversity as some like to call it, is just absolutely out of control and totally disgusting!

     

    Who says that diversity is a good thing? Well, Apple does for starters, but I don't think that this is what they have in mind when Apple speaks of diversity.

     

    Here is proof that diversity is a terrible thing.

     

    This chart is just unbelievable!

     

     

     

    18,796 unique Android devices! Holy f-ucking crap! What a goddam mess!

     

    http://techcrunch.com/2014/08/21/opensignal-2014-android-ecosystem-report/


    No one ever talks about the fragmentation issue when comparing Android to iOS.  All that is ever mentioned is pure market share.  I don't think they'd care if only 5% of Android users were on the latest Android release.  They (the smartphone industry at large) still say that overall market share is everything when it comes to the dominating platform.  It's really, really stupid that there are never any caveats being mentioned.  Huge market share turns an OS platform into a big, bulky ocean liner that takes three miles to make a U-turn.  Any recent changes happen at glacial speed by the time it reaches 50% of the users.  Most of those Android devices aren't even flagship devices that can take most advantage of those OS changes.  All those low-end Android devices that are practically feature-phones are like paperweights to the overall Android platform.  Support is probably dropped on those things in less than the carrier contract time.  Yet you've got these pundits thinking Android is going to wipe out the iOS platform due to greater Android device unit numbers.  That is so stupid.  Gingerbread use is still at around 16% and not dropping all that fast.

  • Reply 99 of 184
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,834member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

     

    No one ever talks about the fragmentation issue when comparing Android to iOS.  All that is ever mentioned is pure market share.  I don't think they'd care if only 5% of Android users were on the latest Android release.  They (the smartphone industry at large) still say that overall market share is everything when it comes to the dominating platform.  It's really, really stupid that there are never any caveats being mentioned.  Huge market share turns an OS platform into a big, bulky ocean liner that takes three miles to make a U-turn.  Any recent changes happen at glacial speed by the time it reaches 50% of the users.  Most of those Android devices aren't even flagship devices that can take most advantage of those OS changes.  All those low-end Android devices that are practically feature-phones are like paperweights to the overall Android platform.  Support is probably dropped on those things in less than the carrier contract time.  Yet you've got these pundits thinking Android is going to wipe out the iOS platform due to greater Android device unit numbers.  That is so stupid.  Gingerbread use is still at around 16% and not dropping all that fast.


    So what's the actual problem with all this fragmentation?  Where are the complaints from Android users?

     

     

    You say low-end Android phones are like feature phones and can't take advantage of the latest OS changes.  So?  If that's how people are using the phones, then what's wrong with that.  They aren't demanding powerful apps or new features.

     

    You say the low-end Android phones are like paperweights to the platform, then also say that support is dropped quickly.  How are they paperweights then, if support is dropped quickly?  Software updates on phones is still quite a new thing, and some people might not care.

     

    You say that high market share turns an OS into an ocean liner for speed of changes, but it doesn't seem to be slowing Android development, and the users on low-end Android phones evidently don't care all that much that they're missing out.

     

     

    Plus, as is often mentioned, Google Play Services is updateable on older versions of Google's Android, and provides updates to the developer API without needing to update Android.

     

    Also, given the relative sizes of the installed base, it's entirely possible that even with fragmentation, the number of Android 4.4 devices still outnumbers the iOS7 devices.

  • Reply 100 of 184
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    What is the advantage for the user? Are these updates by Google, meaning the user doesn't have to wait for their telco to release an update? Tnx

    Nexus devices are updatable via Google. No need to wait on any manufacturer or carrier (just like with Apple). ANd starting in Q1 of 2015 the new Google devices codenamed 'One' (lower end phones) and 'Silver' (high end phones) will get updated by Google as well.

     

    Google Play Edition phones are updatable by the manufacturer, but independant of any carriers. Slightly slower than Nexus devices in getting updates, but still get them fairly quickly (usually within days to a few weeks of Google releasing the factory images.) 

     

    Google recognizes that carriers and OEM's can be slow at updating (if at all) and they want to give users more options than just Nexus devices for those users that want updates quickly, but on more than just 1 or 2 pieces of hardware. 

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