Samsung touts open 'Internet of things' push, says all products to be connected in 5 years

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2015
During Samsung's keynote presentation at the Consumer Electronics Show on Monday, co-CEO B.K. Yoon advocated for an open, industry-wide "Internet of things" push, revealing plans to build in connected device capabilities across its entire product line within five years.



Samsung appears to betting big on the so-called "Internet of things," a broad industry-wide initiative that looks to create a virtual web between electronic devices, allowing for user control and monitoring of everything from washing machines and refrigerators to home security systems.

"Samsung is prepared to play a leading role here," Yoon said.

Instead of a closed platform limited to one operating system or brand, Samsung wants an open development environment that plays no favorites, reports The Wall Street Journal. In his presentation, Yoon advocated against a "walled garden" model, a reference often used to describe Apple's iOS and Mac ecosystem, saying, "We need an open ecosystem so that IoT devices work together, and we need to collaborate across industries."

After purchasing smart home startup SmartThings last August for $200 million, Samsung has moved aggressively toward fulfilling its IoT ambitions. The strategy makes sense for a company with fingers not only in mobile computing technology, but home appliances like laundry machines and air conditioners.

"On behalf of Samsung, I'm making a promise: our IoT components and devices will be open," Yoon said, adding that without open development, "there won't be an Internet of things, because the 'things' will not fit together."

Earlier in the day, Samsung trotted out a fleet of new HDTVs powered by its own Tizen operating system, an OS designed in part to connect the company's broad range of devices. Also debuted at CES were new refrigerator, dish washer, laundry machine and vacuuming products, though the appliances lacked IoT capabilities.

Yoon estimates that 90 percent of his company's products will be connected by 2017 and that "five years from now, every single piece of Samsung hardware will be an IoT device, whether it is an air purifier or an oven."

Apple is also working on a connected device ecosystem in iOS 8's HomeKit framework. A recent initiative for the iPhone maker, HomeKit is only now seeing support from smart home hardware manufacturers, with companies like Elgato and iDevices exhibiting their wares at CES.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53

    Yeah, we need an 'open standard' called Tizen, right? :rolleyes:

     

    Samsung can eat turf. No one with any sense would trust them.

  • Reply 2 of 53
    jason98jason98 Posts: 766member
    Yeah, all things will be connected in my house, though not a single one is going to be swinesung.
    After all these Apple bashing commercials no money is coming to them from my pocket.
  • Reply 3 of 53
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Yeah, we need an 'open standard' called Tizen, right? :rolleyes:

    Samsung can eat turf. No one with any sense would trust them.

    I'm assuming Samsung was attempting a dig at Apple. I'm curious though is HomeKit not open? What exactly defines open?
  • Reply 4 of 53
    larryalarrya Posts: 582member
    Great! I wonder what the best antivirus software will be for my toaster.
  • Reply 5 of 53
    pscooter63pscooter63 Posts: 1,058member

    Yep, a 64-bit vacuum, that's the ticket¡

  • Reply 6 of 53
    rogifan wrote: »
    I'm assuming Samsung was attempting a dig at Apple. I'm curious though is HomeKit not open? What exactly defines open?

    HomeKit is "open" enough for Elgato, iDevices and other companies to use... so it's far from being a "closed" standard.

    But maybe the proper term in Apple's case is "licenced" standard. I'm sure Apple will maintain some sort of certification like they do with MFI.
  • Reply 7 of 53
    The Verge's liveblog coverage of this ludicrous event was hilarious and spared no insults.
  • Reply 8 of 53
    I don't want to live in a world where my fridge can't get a virus that mines dogecoins for the Russian mob.
  • Reply 9 of 53
    The Verge's liveblog coverage of this ludicrous event was hilarious and spared no insults.

    At least people are calling them out for their new TV interface being a total ripoff of LG's WebOS TV interface.

    larrya wrote: »
    Great! I wonder what the best antivirus software will be for my toaster.

    Hopefully you can get Toast for it. 8-)
    rogifan wrote: »
    I'm assuming Samsung was attempting a dig at Apple. I'm curious though is HomeKit not open? What exactly defines open?

    Open is anything that isn't developed by Apple. Android is "open" (it's not by any means, but the kiddies like to throw that word around).
  • Reply 10 of 53
    I've noticed recently that once a company has reached that 'oh shit, we can't compete with that' tipping point, they start waiving the 'open source' flag.

    First Google, then Samsung.

    If you look at the companies that are in denial, by thinking they can actually compete, they simply wither away: Dell, Blackberry, Microsoft.

    We'll see how this plays out for Samsung....
  • Reply 11 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post



    Open is anything that isn't developed by Apple. Android is "open" (it's not by any means, but the kiddies like to throw that word around).

     

    ctOS

  • Reply 12 of 53

    The thing that makes people read FCUK as FUÇK... it makes me read B.K.Yoon as 'Booyah' every time. 

     

    I am in the market for a new refrigerator. It is a pity that Apple doesn't make any!

  • Reply 13 of 53
    I've noticed recently that once a company has reached that 'oh shit, we can't compete with that' tipping point, they start waiving the 'open source' flag.

    First Google, then Samsung.

    If you look at the companies that are in denial, by thinking they can actually compete, they simply wither away: Dell, Blackberry, Microsoft.

    We'll see how this plays out for Samsung....

    Indeed! Samsung cannot hit targets they announce a year away, but then go on record to aim for one five years out.... as if....

    Listening to the o-CEO talk you get a mental pictured of him arriving at CES in a clown car in full costume.
  • Reply 14 of 53
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,352member

    Last I checked, Legos are patented and they have no problem fitting together...

  • Reply 15 of 53
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,319member
    I've noticed recently that once a company has reached that 'oh shit, we can't compete with that' tipping point, they start waiving the 'open source' flag.

    First Google, then Samsung.

    If you look at the companies that are in denial, by thinking they can actually compete, they simply wither away: Dell, Blackberry, Microsoft.

    We'll see how this plays out for Samsung....

    Pretty much. "We're too fucking incompetent and don't have what it takes to create a standard that will be successful and widely adopted, as Apple routinely does, so, uh... OPEN!!

    Samsung can't even fucking decide what OS to use in their products. Their event was as cringe worthy as all their previous ones. You'd think with all the money they have, they could hire some people to advise them about things like "taste" and "class", or how not to make a laughable keynote.
  • Reply 16 of 53
    jkichlinejkichline Posts: 1,352member

    So you're telling me that Samsung is already five years behind Apple then? My IPhone, iPad, Mac, TV and lights all are connected just fine. I don't need my dishwasher, toaster oven and washing machine connected. That's just dumb, not smart.

  • Reply 17 of 53

    Fine.  Be a leader, Samsung.  At the very least make and publish a standard, and then implement it on all your products, a way for them to all communicate their status and be appropriately remotely controlled, only without any data being sent to your servers.  My data on your servers gives me no value add, so it must all work without needing your servers to work.

  • Reply 18 of 53
    adybadyb Posts: 199member
    I'm just wondering why? Why do they all need to talk to each other? What does my washing machine need to say to my toaster? I don't want my refrigerator talking to the supermarket as I don't always want the same things & I don't want stuff ordering automatically if it thinks I'm running out of something.

    Maybe if they could get my washing to automatically beam over to my dryer there might be some value but otherwise it just sounds like [tinfoil hat time] a means of gathering more personal information.

    Aside from the fact that I have decided that I will not buy any Samsung branded goods (components I can do nothing about), I am more likely to avoid electrical goods that offer this, as it seems to simply be adding complexity/cost where it's not needed.

    Rant over!
  • Reply 19 of 53
    Just another IT bod worried that if we have properly controlled products made by companies that know what they are doing he won't get paid anywhere near as much to sort things out! Yes we need open standards like JPEG and the like but we need to avoid the mess that so often ensues when they are not properly controlled. Hence the reason Apple employ a more closed system where at least some vetting takes place before apps and other things go to public.
  • Reply 20 of 53
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,670member
    The open standard could co-exist with homekit. The former is Internet connectivity. The latter a local connectivity. Bluetooth or LAN isn't the Internet.
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