Apple drops Helvetica for San Francisco in iOS 9

1235

Comments

  • Reply 81 of 118

    It may seem like such a small refinement, but it really makes a huge difference. iOS 9 feels so much more polished and sophisticated especially vs iOS 7. 

    It goes back to looking like a high end software after the truly awful 7. 



    Great job.

  • Reply 82 of 118
    Long-time Apple users agree: That is *not* San Francisco!
  • Reply 83 of 118
    The new font is a little uglier.

    But it's actually weighted more evenly and will likely be more legible for folks with less than ideal vision.

    So it's a win.

    I personally will miss the Helvetica Neue however. Especially the Ultralight.
  • Reply 84 of 118
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cornchip View Post





    For Helvetica, or any other font they ever used to market their hardware and software

    Adobe owns Helvetica Neue and you can license it, but not for use on the web using @font-face because it is not part of TypeKit. By creating a similar font, Apple can now make all of their OS, apps, packaging and web presence consistent. San Francisco has 9 font weights so it should be as versatile as Helvetica Neue.

  • Reply 85 of 118
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post



     They probably didn't rework the whole font because there are thousand of glyphs to cover with Asian characters, Arabic etc.

    Helvetica Neue does not have any Arabic glyphs and only has Japanese and Korean for Asian languages. No Chinese as far as I know. Who knows what Apple will do in regard to foreign fonts?

  • Reply 86 of 118
    There are things you "notice" consciously, and thing your notice unconsciously. I suspect even people who look at font examples and don't see a difference, will still find using their device "easier", less tiring, etc.
  • Reply 87 of 118
    There's a lot of naysaying here, like a broken septic pump hose spraying crap in every direction. If Apple did anything, it's nay nay nay. And someone was trying to defend naysaying as not mindless...LOL.
  • Reply 88 of 118
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by joe28753 View Post

     

    Maybe they shouldn't be driving if they can't see?


    What an utterly dumb comment.

     

    Drivers' licenses are not (at least, in principle) issued without an eye test.

  • Reply 89 of 118

    Had I not known about the font change, it would have probably taken me a while to notice that "something is different, but I can't put my finger on it". Knowing about the change beforehand helped me to immediately notice the subtle differences. While I like the font itself, it doesn't appear as "solid" as the previous font on my iPhone 6 - similar to how a thin font looks on a non-Retina display - as if the anti-aliasing in the rendering engine needs some tweaking.

  • Reply 90 of 118
    I can't tell the difference. What's the point?

    From what I understand you change something because there's a noticeable difference.

    key word being "you". typeface design isn't for everyone. my dad doesn't know the difference between all kinds of stuff on computers (iOS 7, 8, 9?), doesn't mean they're bad.

    durr.
  • Reply 91 of 118
    Bezier functions are great, and produce beautiful lines. I don't know why Ive has to pretend they don't exist, or why he has such allegiance to building his fonts out of perfect circles and lines. It's elegant in the way Schoenberg is -- some theoretical appeal, but looks terrible. It's like we've regressed to 15th century woodcut technology.
  • Reply 92 of 118
    boredumbboredumb Posts: 1,418member

    Just did my iPhone6, seems easy now, of course...

    But everything looks smaller, and that is NOT good for

    old eyes and pudgy, careless fingers...

     

    And why "Wallet"???  Isn't that Googlese?  

     

    And, as someone else mentioned, why does iCloud storage say

    on the downgrade page that I've already lowered to the 50GB level,

    while the "available" page still says I have 180GB?

  • Reply 93 of 118
    appexappex Posts: 687member
    Whatever Sans Serif font is easier to spot and read than the obnoxious Serif fonts.
  • Reply 94 of 118
    C
    Exactly, why make a big deal about it when almost no one will notice.

    Cosmetic changes to typefaces can be significant for those with vision difficulties. If you personally don't appreciate the difference then move on. Those that benefit will be posting positive comments on those improvements.
  • Reply 95 of 118
    almondroca wrote: »
    If you can't tell the difference, then you just move on. Others can tell the difference, which is why it was changed.

    Exactly, why make a big deal about it when almost no one will notice.

    No, almost everyone will notice. A few plebeians will not notice, but right now they are mostly using Android and think it's "just like" an iPhone...
  • Reply 96 of 118
    milford wrote: »
    Bezier functions are great, and produce beautiful lines. I don't know why Ive has to pretend they don't exist, or why he has such allegiance to building his fonts out of perfect circles and lines. It's elegant in the way Schoenberg is -- some theoretical appeal, but looks terrible. It's like we've regressed to 15th century woodcut technology.

    I find the new font easier to read (70-year-old eyes). Helvetica letters are too close together so it;s hard to tell a lower case R followed by a lower case N from looking exactly like a lower case M. Not so with the San Francisco font. which spaces out better.
  • Reply 97 of 118
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,897member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by satchmo View Post

     

     

    A Ferrari has nicer lines and more elegant than a Honda, but not very practical for most people.

     

    Yes, I get what you're saying. That's why Helvetica is a classic...but is not optimized for small screen devices i.e. watch

    In this case, usability trumps aesthetics. And it's not like San Francisco font is garish. 


    Yes true, and consider that Helvetica was designed a very long time ago.  Things have been learned since then about readability and character form.  I have to wear reading glasses but it is impractical to put them on every time I whip out my phone.  So I have the text set to a larger size on the phone.  I also had it bolded until today.  I find the San Francisco easier to read and the keyboard case shift a much better design.  It's a win for me.

  • Reply 98 of 118
    Where can I find the wallpaper for the cityscape in the screenshot at the top of this article? I love it!
    I love the new San Fran font too. Feels very clean and refined.
  • Reply 99 of 118
    jakebjakeb Posts: 562member

    Readability is about more than size. It has a lot to do with letterforms being distinct and having all the nice little cues that tip off your subconscious about which letter is which. Typing something in all caps will be "larger", but it will also be less readable because uppercase letters are more similar to each other compared to lower case letters. 

  • Reply 100 of 118
    takeotakeo Posts: 446member

    Good move. Helvetica was released in 1957 and was never designed for screen usage (or even for long copy and small point sizes... even in the 1950's). It was a horrible choice for a graphical user interface.

Sign In or Register to comment.