AirPlay 2 disappears from newest iOS 11.3 & tvOS 11.3 betas

Posted:
in iPhone
Despite prior support in Apple's development track, AirPlay 2 appears to have been removed from the third iOS 11.3 and tvOS 11.3 betas, issued earlier on Tuesday.




Beta testers can no longer take advantage of features like multi-room audio, or including an Apple TV in the iOS Home app, iDB noted. Apple has yet to provide an explanation.

It could be that AirPlay 2 support is being postponed until 11.3.x or later, since it had a rough implementation in recent betas. Alternately it could be reintroduced in upcoming 11.3 beta seeds, and was simply taken out briefly for polishing.

Once it's finished AirPlay 2 should provide an Apple-based alternative to platforms like Sonos or Google's Chromecast Audio. It was originally announced at WWDC 2017, but didn't make it into the initial release of iOS 11 in September.

It also failed to materialize in time for this month's launch of the HomePod, for which the standard was likely conceived.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    Here's hoping somebody actually decided it's time for Apple to do it right... AirPlay is one of the more glitchy wireless audio/video protocols I've used. 
  • Reply 2 of 21
    SendMcjakSendMcjak Posts: 66unconfirmed, member
    AirPlay 2 might just make WWDC 2018!
    rapcatmeow
  • Reply 3 of 21
    Here's hoping somebody actually decided it's time for Apple to do it right... AirPlay is one of the more glitchy wireless audio/video protocols I've used. 
    How so specifically? I have several AP products and it never crossed my mind to think of it as a glitchy protocol. BT, sure, but not AP.
    watto_cobrajbdragon
  • Reply 4 of 21
    Here's hoping somebody actually decided it's time for Apple to do it right... AirPlay is one of the more glitchy wireless audio/video protocols I've used. 
    Airplay is very stable
    watto_cobrajbdragon
  • Reply 5 of 21
    I am concerned about the lack of Airplay 2 support for developers -- no current docs or sample code.  To me this indicates that it is not nearly ready for prime time.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 21
    Airplay from a Mac is extremely glitchy.
    Randomly disconnects while streaming YouTube videos.
    It's fine using Airfoil, however. 
  • Reply 7 of 21
    Airplay from a Mac is extremely glitchy.
    Randomly disconnects while streaming YouTube videos.
    It's fine using Airfoil, however. 
    I think that is YT's fault!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 21
    snookasnoosnookasnoo Posts: 4unconfirmed, member
    Airplay from a Mac is extremely glitchy.
    Randomly disconnects while streaming YouTube videos.
    It's fine using Airfoil, however. 
    No it's not.  I've used it for years in a 5200 sq ft house.  The problem is in your network or something else.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 21
    Airplay from a Mac is extremely glitchy.
    Randomly disconnects while streaming YouTube videos.
    It's fine using Airfoil, however. 
    I think that is YT's fault!
    I’m not the other guy but I also have usssies with AirPlay. Doesn’t like screen mirroring on my Apple TV sometimes. And that’s from web embedded videos, photo library videos and other apps. It’s buggy. 
  • Reply 10 of 21
    Here's hoping somebody actually decided it's time for Apple to do it right... AirPlay is one of the more glitchy wireless audio/video protocols I've used. 
    I find Airplay to be way more reliable than Bluetooth. What type of issues do you have in other apps? 
    edited February 2018 jbdragon
  • Reply 11 of 21
    iOS11 is the worst iOS release ever.
    And I am increasingly annoyed by Apple announcing features that never make it to the intended iOS release.
    A few examples: above mentioned Airplay 2, iMessages in the Cloud, People sync in iOS10...

    It would be nice if the iOS had a release schedule independent of hardware, that updates were to actually fix things, and that new features are introduced progressively, instead of announcing them, putting them in betas, and then remove them or postpone them to the next iOS x.0 release...
  • Reply 12 of 21
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,035member
    Airplay from a Mac is extremely glitchy.
    Randomly disconnects while streaming YouTube videos.
    It's fine using Airfoil, however. 
    I think that is YT's fault!
    How would that be Google's fault?
    edited February 2018
  • Reply 13 of 21
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,854member
    Airplay from a Mac is extremely glitchy.
    Randomly disconnects while streaming YouTube videos.
    It's fine using Airfoil, however. 
    I think that is YT's fault!
    I’m not the other guy but I also have usssies with AirPlay. Doesn’t like screen mirroring on my Apple TV sometimes. And that’s from web embedded videos, photo library videos and other apps. It’s buggy. 
    Playing from my iPad Mini 2 to an Apple TV I've seen similar issues. Haven't tried the iPad Air though as I hardly ever use the Apple TV.

    For me Airplay didn't prove reliable enough.
  • Reply 14 of 21
    pakitt said:
    iOS11 is the worst iOS release ever.
    And I am increasingly annoyed by Apple announcing features that never make it to the intended iOS release.
    A few examples: above mentioned Airplay 2, iMessages in the Cloud, People sync in iOS10...

    It would be nice if the iOS had a release schedule independent of hardware, that updates were to actually fix things, and that new features are introduced progressively, instead of announcing them, putting them in betas, and then remove them or postpone them to the next iOS x.0 release...
    I hate to be another person dumping on Apple, and I don’t know if iOS 11 is the worst release ever, but I agree that Apple has lost the quality control levels it used to have. So much so that I stopped even entertaining the idea of running a beta version of software. I got burned a few times in iOS 9 and 10; given that it’s not necessary to try out the beta versions (I used to kid myself that I was doing it to help development efforts, but it was really just due to impatience to try out new features), I stopped. While the current iOS seems stable enough, it just seems less than solid in a diffuse sort of way.

    But Apple did announce a new approach to software development and release, which means the company realises that there is a problem it needs to fix. I really appreciate the fact that they are looking at the problem and at ways to fix it. Hopefully it will also fix the increasing issue of announcing new features but then not delivering them in what seems like a reasonable timeframe.

    I actually do recognise that Apple is having to scale its operations to meet the demands of millions and millions of users and devices. I take these issues as just growing pains and, overall, they don’t make me think that Apple has « lost it » and is swirling around the drain.
  • Reply 15 of 21
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,675member
    There’s a bit of a “catch 22” here. When Apple is going to release a major new feature like Airplay 2, they kind of have to announce it before putting it out in public betas, right? A complex feature (from an engineering sense) like Airplay 2 really needs to be tested in public betas in order to put it through real-world variables to find and fix bugs, right? Apple (or anyone) likes to have those bugs sorted out before issuing the gold release, at least at this point in the history of the business.

    So isn’t it a bit odd to complain about Apple (or any company) announcing a feature before putting out the beta versions, and then being impatient and upset while they take the time to get it right? Isn’t it doubly odd to complain about beta software being buggy? 

    Seriously, how would you have Apple (or any company) work through this process? You know, besides getting everything perfect in alpha stage, skipping beta, and going from announcement to final release immediately, with all features included and working perfectly.

    Don’t forget that even the late, great St. Steve announced the first iPhone, held together with spit and duct tape, months before the product was released, and then put out a device and OS that had no GPS, no app store, a low-res camera, and no cut-and-paste. Though it wasn’t labeled as such, the whole enterprise was a public beta. Practically speaking, the iPhone and iOS were really public beta items until iOS 3 and the iPhone 3GS. Can you imagine the outrage if Apple under Tim Cook carried out a hardware or software release with that sort of half-baked, seat-of-the-pants, not-ready-for primetime approach? At least now they’re a little more honest about the process. 
  • Reply 16 of 21
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,035member
    AppleZulu said:
    There’s a bit of a “catch 22” here. When Apple is going to release a major new feature like Airplay 2, they kind of have to announce it before putting it out in public betas, right? A complex feature (from an engineering sense) like Airplay 2 really needs to be tested in public betas in order to put it through real-world variables to find and fix bugs, right? Apple (or anyone) likes to have those bugs sorted out before issuing the gold release, at least at this point in the history of the business.

    So isn’t it a bit odd to complain about Apple (or any company) announcing a feature before putting out the beta versions, and then being impatient and upset while they take the time to get it right? Isn’t it doubly odd to complain about beta software being buggy? 

    Seriously, how would you have Apple (or any company) work through this process? You know, besides getting everything perfect in alpha stage, skipping beta, and going from announcement to final release immediately, with all features included and working perfectly.

    Don’t forget that even the late, great St. Steve announced the first iPhone, held together with spit and duct tape, months before the product was released, and then put out a device and OS that had no GPS, no app store, a low-res camera, and no cut-and-paste. Though it wasn’t labeled as such, the whole enterprise was a public beta. Practically speaking, the iPhone and iOS were really public beta items until iOS 3 and the iPhone 3GS. Can you imagine the outrage if Apple under Tim Cook carried out a hardware or software release with that sort of half-baked, seat-of-the-pants, not-ready-for primetime approach? At least now they’re a little more honest about the process. 
    1) They did announce it almost a year ago.

    2) Wouldn't it be transparent to the user. It's not like the customer needs to know that an app was made using Swift 4.0 or Swift 3.0.

  • Reply 17 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,652member
    AppleZulu said:
    There’s a bit of a “catch 22” here. When Apple is going to release a major new feature like Airplay 2, they kind of have to announce it before putting it out in public betas, right? A complex feature (from an engineering sense) like Airplay 2 really needs to be tested in public betas in order to put it through real-world variables to find and fix bugs, right? Apple (or anyone) likes to have those bugs sorted out before issuing the gold release, at least at this point in the history of the business.

    So isn’t it a bit odd to complain about Apple (or any company) announcing a feature before putting out the beta versions, and then being impatient and upset while they take the time to get it right? Isn’t it doubly odd to complain about beta software being buggy? 

    Seriously, how would you have Apple (or any company) work through this process? You know, besides getting everything perfect in alpha stage, skipping beta, and going from announcement to final release immediately, with all features included and working perfectly.

    Don’t forget that even the late, great St. Steve announced the first iPhone, held together with spit and duct tape, months before the product was released, and then put out a device and OS that had no GPS, no app store, a low-res camera, and no cut-and-paste. Though it wasn’t labeled as such, the whole enterprise was a public beta. Practically speaking, the iPhone and iOS were really public beta items until iOS 3 and the iPhone 3GS. Can you imagine the outrage if Apple under Tim Cook carried out a hardware or software release with that sort of half-baked, seat-of-the-pants, not-ready-for primetime approach? At least now they’re a little more honest about the process. 
    I didn't get the feeling taking time to get it right with beta tests is any issue. I think it's the what's perceived to be inordinate amount of time it's taking since it was announced approaching 10 months ago. The implication at the time was "coming soon" and users were excited for it. Some are now voicing a bit of frustration with Apple's silence on the matter now, especially as it was promoted as a selling point for their new HomePods. And yes some have already bought two (or more) believing it's was coming any day now. 

    FWIW I pretty much agree with you, take time to get it right, but by announcing last year all the wonderful things Airplay2 was bringing to the Apple community they created high expectations for it and being right around the corner, expectations that are taking a bit long to materialize. Silence on the matter isn't helping.  
  • Reply 18 of 21
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,268member
    I find that AirPlay works great for me.   Why is AirPlay 2 is taking so long?!?!  What in the world is going on with Apple on the software side of things?!?!  
  • Reply 19 of 21
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,675member
    gatorguy said:
    AppleZulu said:
    There’s a bit of a “catch 22” here. When Apple is going to release a major new feature like Airplay 2, they kind of have to announce it before putting it out in public betas, right? A complex feature (from an engineering sense) like Airplay 2 really needs to be tested in public betas in order to put it through real-world variables to find and fix bugs, right? Apple (or anyone) likes to have those bugs sorted out before issuing the gold release, at least at this point in the history of the business.

    So isn’t it a bit odd to complain about Apple (or any company) announcing a feature before putting out the beta versions, and then being impatient and upset while they take the time to get it right? Isn’t it doubly odd to complain about beta software being buggy? 

    Seriously, how would you have Apple (or any company) work through this process? You know, besides getting everything perfect in alpha stage, skipping beta, and going from announcement to final release immediately, with all features included and working perfectly.

    Don’t forget that even the late, great St. Steve announced the first iPhone, held together with spit and duct tape, months before the product was released, and then put out a device and OS that had no GPS, no app store, a low-res camera, and no cut-and-paste. Though it wasn’t labeled as such, the whole enterprise was a public beta. Practically speaking, the iPhone and iOS were really public beta items until iOS 3 and the iPhone 3GS. Can you imagine the outrage if Apple under Tim Cook carried out a hardware or software release with that sort of half-baked, seat-of-the-pants, not-ready-for primetime approach? At least now they’re a little more honest about the process. 
    I didn't get the feeling taking time to get it right with beta tests is any issue. I think it's the what's perceived to be inordinate amount of time it's taking since it was announced approaching 10 months ago. The implication at the time was "coming soon" and users were excited for it. Some are now voicing a bit of frustration with Apple's silence on the matter now, especially as it was promoted as a selling point for their new HomePods. And yes some have already bought two (or more) believing it's was coming any day now. 

    FWIW I pretty much agree with you, take time to get it right, but by announcing last year all the wonderful things Airplay2 was bringing to the Apple community they created high expectations for it and being right around the corner, expectations that are taking a bit long to materialize. Silence on the matter isn't helping.  
    Of course it creates high expectations. That's why they do the dog-and-pony show. It seems like it will be an interesting and useful new feature. I'm sure the folks at Apple are pretty anxious about how long it's been as well, and would have much preferred to put it out there with a HomePod release last October or November, and probably thought that it would be. The nature of beta testing, however, is that you don't find the problems until you find the problems. Contrary to much of the online chatter, Apple's quality standards are still high, and so it won't go fully live until it's ready. And because they're working in a competitive environment, they're not going to be fully transparent and broadcast the details of what's holding it up.

    Right about now, there likely are probably some fairly intense conversations in the new building about beefing up in-house alpha testing of new features and products. That approach is subject to diminishing returns, however, because it's the act of putting something out in the wild that turns up the variables no one in-house thought of or could simulate. That brings us full circle to the need to make public announcements and do the dog-and-pony show before putting out something significant in a beta release. People will notice it if they're testing it, and a dog-and-pony show done later about a feature that's been tested and discussed in public for months really doesn't have the same impact, does it? 
  • Reply 20 of 21
    Here's hoping somebody actually decided it's time for Apple to do it right... AirPlay is one of the more glitchy wireless audio/video protocols I've used. 
    How so specifically? I have several AP products and it never crossed my mind to think of it as a glitchy protocol. BT, sure, but not AP.
    thrang said:
    Airplay is very stable
    Audio dropouts, even with low SNR in the wireless spectrum. AirPlay devices can inexplicably disappear from the AirPlay menu on devices despite being connected to the network, or will take up to a minute to show up in the list of devices. Dropped connections during playback, etc... this has been pretty consistent over the last 7 years or so that I have been using AirPlay - though to be fair, it works often enough that I keep using it, albeit with a fair share of grumbling. Bluetooth has been more reliable for me.
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