Intel refreshes H-series processor used in 2018 MacBook Pro, still 14nm

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 23
Intel has refreshed its H-series processor line that was used in the 2018 MacBook Pro with a collection that boasts one eight-core processor capable of a 5GHz clock speed, but one that is also continuing to use the aging 14-nanometer production process.




The H-series Intel Core Mobile processors consist of six chips, including two Core i9 models, two Core i7, and two Core i5. While there are varying core counts and clock speeds, all of the processors have a Thermal Design Power of 45, making them useful for temperature-constrained notebooks like the MacBook range, as well as support for two channels of DDR4-2666 memory, and support for Intel Optane.

At the high end are the Core i9-9980HK and the Core i9-9880H, with base clock speeds of 2.4GHz and 2.3GHz respectively, rising to 5.0GHz and 4.8GHz under Turbo Boost. Both have eight cores and 16 threads, 16MB of Smart Cache, and take advantage of Intel's Thermal Velocity Boost feature, but the i9-9980HK is also the only one in the entire range to ship unlocked.

The mid-tier Core i7 is made up of the Core i7-9850H and Core i7-9750H, a pair of chips that are quite similar in having a base clock of 2.6GHz, six cores, 12 threads, and 12MB of Smart Cache. Where the two differ are under boosted clock speeds, with the i7-9850H achieving 4.6GHz to the other's 4.5GHz, and though it isn't fully unlocked, the i7-9850H is partially unlocked.




At the bottom end of the table are the Core i5-9400H and i5-9300H, quad-core processors with eight threads and 8MB of Smart Cache. The i5-9400H has base and boosted clocks of 2.5GHz and 4.3GHz respectively, while the i5-9300H rounds off the list with a base clock of 2.4Ghz and a boosted clock of 4.1GHz.

According to Intel, the new mobile chips are ideal for content creators wanting to edit and transcode 4K video, as well as for gaming. It is claimed the group offers up to 33 percent better performance overall compared with a three-year-old PC, as well as up to 28 percent increased responsiveness, and continuous performance optimization with Intel Dynamic Tuning.

There is also support for Intel Wi-Fi 6 AX200, which is said to offer up to 75 percent latency reduction and three times the throughput of an 802.11ax-based setup, when paired with a suitable router.

The new processors are starting to ship from Tuesday in notebooks from a number of major vendors, including Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP, Lenovo, and MSI. It is unclear if Apple will adopt some of the processors in the range in its MacBook lineup at this time, but the group seem to be fairly suitable candidates.

While the chips promise better speed and performance overall, Intel is continuing to develop its mobile processors under a 14 nanometer-based process, rather than opting for a die shrink. It has released some processors using a 10-nanometer process, in 2018, and has also rebuffed claims development of the fabrication process has been abandoned completely.

In January, Intel teased its 9th-generation desktop processors, again using the 14-nanometer process, but at the same time it showed off its first "Ice Lake" 10-nanometer processor, which it anticipated putting out by the 2019 holiday season.

It is possible that Apple could move away from Intel chips for its Macs entirely, switching over to its own ARM-based processors as early as 2020. Meanwhile, Apple is using chip foundry partner TSMC to create A-series chips using a 7-nanometer process, and could shift down to a 6-nanometer process for the A14 in 2020.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 38
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    dt17
  • Reply 2 of 38
    mazda 3smazda 3s Posts: 1,578member
    Can't wait until Apple's in-house ARM chips are ready to kick Intel to the curb.
    razorpitDanManTXn2itivguyJWSClibertyandfreedt17
  • Reply 3 of 38
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,461member
    vukasika said:
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    Horse manure.
    chasmmacxpresschia
  • Reply 4 of 38
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 726member
    I don't see any point to upgrade until switching to ARM.  In fact, I'd think that 2018 version will be the last one in the current generation.
    dee_deedt17
  • Reply 5 of 38
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,026member
    Intel, good job achieving 5Ghz speed for laptop processors but what about your 10nm Sunny Cove ICE processors release/shipping schedule ? Hope, Intel say something about it during it's 4/25 Thursday's earning and demo full fledged line of processors at the end of May during 2019 computex in Taipei. Than, I can project when 2019 Macbook/Macbook Pro will update them. When Intel is getting to 10nm, world fab labs have moved to 7nm,6nm and soon 5nm.

    edited April 23 libertyandfreetmay
  • Reply 6 of 38
    All I want is a 13" quad-core MacBook Pro. It should be the bottomline for MacBook Pros leaving dual-core for the MacBook and Air. With a T-2 chip for video encoding, I'm fine with the integrated graphics for general multimedia work.
    mazda 3s
  • Reply 7 of 38
    tomahawktomahawk Posts: 159member
    DuhSesame said:
    I don't see any point to upgrade until switching to ARM.  In fact, I'd think that 2018 version will be the last one in the current generation.
    Except any location buying Macs because they support Bootcamp might want something newer and available through a transition.  I suspect Apple will loose a chunk of sales if they go all ARM and can't support running Windows (and all Windows programs, not ARM capable only).

    That, or the ARM processors need to be able to emulate an Intel processor and near realtime performance for some type of virtual machine solution (aka Connectix Virtual PC on steroids).
    uktechie
  • Reply 8 of 38
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,703member
    To Tomahawk's point, I am quite confident that Apple will continue to offer Intel chips as an option for Bootcamp users even well after they start the move to ARM-based chips. For those people bashing Intel for not moving on from 14nm, I would remind you of two things:

    1. Desktop/notebook chips are a very different class of chip than mobile chips, so the comparison to TSMC's achievements is all but moot. There's a reason why this transition, when it happens, will take a good long while to complete. Desktop/notebook chips do a LOT more "stuff" than mobile chips.

    2. AMD hasn't "moved on" from 14nm chips either, last I looked.

    That said, Intel is supposed to be industry leader and should, by its own admission, be further along on 10nm than it is, so they deserve some criticism. But particularly with the x86 baggage these chips carry, don't be surprised if 10nm stays the standard in the desktop/notebook space for quite some years, once affordably achieved.
    edited April 23 pscooter63pratikindiamuthuk_vanalingamtmay
  • Reply 9 of 38
    All I want is a 13" quad-core MacBook Pro. It should be the bottomline for MacBook Pros leaving dual-core for the MacBook and Air. With a T-2 chip for video encoding, I'm fine with the integrated graphics for general multimedia work.
    Go buy one.  Available now (since the last MBP refresh) on the Apple web site...
    edited April 23 chialibertyandfreeaknabi
  • Reply 10 of 38
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,297member
    All I want is a 13" quad-core MacBook Pro. It should be the bottomline for MacBook Pros leaving dual-core for the MacBook and Air. With a T-2 chip for video encoding, I'm fine with the integrated graphics for general multimedia work.
    Those have been available since last July.
    chia
  • Reply 11 of 38
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,999administrator
    vukasika said:
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    it does absolutely nothing of the sort.
    StrangeDayschiapscooter63
  • Reply 12 of 38
    vukasika said:
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    it does absolutely nothing of the sort.
    S
    o I’m the only one in the thread who’s concerned about heat management & thermal throttling issues of an even faster chip in the MacBook Pro as currently designed... LoL O-K
  • Reply 13 of 38
    lkrupp said:
    vukasika said:
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    Horse manure.

    Right because the current high end MacBook has no heat management issues whatsoever.  Keep sipping that Koolade my friend.
  • Reply 14 of 38
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,999administrator
    vukasika said:
    vukasika said:
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    it does absolutely nothing of the sort.
    So I’m the only one in the thread who’s concerned about heat management & thermal throttling issues of an even faster chip in the MacBook Pro as currently designed... LoL O-K
    No, you aren't the only one. However, we've already demonstrated that the existing processor doesn't, and the TDP on the new chips is the same.

    We'll test it, the same as we always do. I guarantee that we won't see it drop to the speed of an i3 single-core.
    edited April 23 fastasleepStrangeDayschiaradarthekatkruegdude
  • Reply 15 of 38
    chasm said:
    To Tomahawk's point, I am quite confident that Apple will continue to offer Intel chips as an option for Bootcamp users even well after they start the move to ARM-based chips. For those people bashing Intel for not moving on from 14nm, I would remind you of two things:

    1. Desktop/notebook chips are a very different class of chip than mobile chips, so the comparison to TSMC's achievements is all but moot. There's a reason why this transition, when it happens, will take a good long while to complete. Desktop/notebook chips do a LOT more "stuff" than mobile chips.

    2. AMD hasn't "moved on" from 14nm chips either, last I looked.

    That said, Intel is supposed to be industry leader and should, by its own admission, be further along on 10nm than it is, so they deserve some criticism. But particularly with the x86 baggage these chips carry, don't be surprised if 10nm stays the standard in the desktop/notebook space for quite some years, once affordably achieved.
    There shouldn't be any difference in current Apple's architecture, for Macs, it should be as simple as adding more cores.  I also doubt the importance of Boot Camp, most people bought Macs because they want to use it like a Mac.

    Speaking of AMD, Zen 2 will be 7nm, and it will be here no later this year.  It most likely will be two 8-core CPU die on the same board.

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/13829/amd-ryzen-3rd-generation-zen-2-pcie-4-eight-core


    edited April 23 dt17mazda 3schia
  • Reply 16 of 38
    I'm more concerned with thermal constraints if this is anything resembling the 8700k->9900k heat bath.

    The bottom multithreaded speeds are dropped by 500-600mhz per core so you end up with:

    8950hk   6 x 2.9
    9980hk   8 x 2.4
    9980h    8 x 2.3

    *IF* Apple decides to adopt the new chips in a refresh, coupled with the already hot and bothered running of the 8950hk, it will be interesting
    to see how it pans out if included in the current design or a (mild?) redesign.

    I know my Macbook Pro 2018 i9 gets plenty toasty @ 2.9 across all cores (but never drops, working as designed). I'll have to keep a lookout
    for reviews on Windows laptops to see how much of a difference, thermally speaking, the new(ish) chips introduce. I'm sure the reduced multicore
    frequency it so allow the higher core count to fit in the same 45w envelope, but still....
    edited April 23
  • Reply 17 of 38
    I'm more concerned with thermal constraints if this is anything resembling the 8700k->9900k heat bath.

    The bottom multithreaded speeds are dropped by 500-600mhz per core so you end up with:

    8950hk   6 x 2.9
    9980hk   8 x 2.4
    9980h    8 x 2.3

    *IF* Apple decides to adopt the new chips in a refresh, coupled with the already hot and bothered running of the 8950hk, it will be interesting
    to see how it pans out if included in the current design or a (mild?) redesign.

    I know my Macbook Pro 2018 i9 gets plenty toasty @ 2.9 across all cores (but never drops, working as designed). I'll have to keep a lookout
    for reviews on Windows laptops to see how much of a difference, thermally speaking, the new(ish) chips introduce. I'm sure the reduced multicore
    frequency it so allow the higher core count to fit in the same 45w envelope, but still....
    I think most of them got screwed too.  Some people brag about having more heat pipes and extra design helps a lot, but in reality, all of them throttled to similar scores.
    tht
  • Reply 18 of 38
    Johan42Johan42 Posts: 163member
    wood1208 said:
    Intel, good job achieving 5Ghz speed for laptop processors but what about your 10nm Sunny Cove ICE processors release/shipping schedule ? Hope, Intel say something about it during it's 4/25 Thursday's earning and demo full fledged line of processors at the end of May during 2019 computex in Taipei. Than, I can project when 2019 Macbook/Macbook Pro will update them. When Intel is getting to 10nm, world fab labs have moved to 7nm,6nm and soon 5nm.

    Intel’s 10nm is superior to the so-called “7nm”. Don’t believe the marketing crap.
  • Reply 19 of 38
    vukasika said:
    vukasika said:
    Intel codenamed the new chip “Supernova” given its tendency to thermal throttle down to the speed of an i3 single core in the current slim MacBook Pro form factor... 
    it does absolutely nothing of the sort.
    So I’m the only one in the thread who’s concerned about heat management & thermal throttling issues of an even faster chip in the MacBook Pro as currently designed... LoL O-K
    No, you aren't the only one. However, we've already demonstrated that the existing processor doesn't, and the TDP on the new chips is the same.

    We'll test it, the same as we always do. I guarantee that we won't see it drop to the speed of an i3 single-core.
    OmG if you thought the single core i3 comment was serious rather than an exaggeration to make the point of the throttling handicapping performance, you desperately need either a drink or sex, likely both... geez
  • Reply 20 of 38
    wreighven said:
    All I want is a 13" quad-core MacBook Pro. It should be the bottomline for MacBook Pros leaving dual-core for the MacBook and Air. With a T-2 chip for video encoding, I'm fine with the integrated graphics for general multimedia work.
    Go buy one.  Available now (since the last MBP refresh) on the Apple web site...
    I forgot to add with 32GB of low power DDR4 ram. I have a lot VMs and 16GB is entirely insufficient.
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