New Apple iPhone ad sells Face ID as the perfect lazy sign-in option [u]

Posted:
in iPhone edited July 8
Apple on Monday premiered a new iPhone TV ad, "Nap," concentrating on the minimal effort needed to use Face ID.

iPhone XR Face ID ad


The 40-second spot stars a man napping on an auto-reclining chair in his backyard, with an iPhone XR perched on an endtable. As he raises the chair to check a barrage of incoming texts, the phone unlocks and displays his notifications without him lifting a finger.

"Even easier and more secure than Touch ID," a tagline reads. "That's iPhone."





Apple has previously highlighted the usefulness of Face ID as an authentication system in a video ad spot. In July 2018, the feature in the iPhone X was marketed in a commercial featuring a man on stage struggling to remember his password under pressure.

Face ID is so far present only on the iPhone X, XR, XS, and XS Max, as well as 2018 iPad Pros. Even 2019 Macs and iPads so far lack the technology, presumably because of the parts cost of TrueDepth cameras combined with wanting to upsell people on more profitable hardware.

Apple recently enabled Face ID and Touch ID logins for iCloud on the Web, though only for people using beta operating systems.

Update: Apple published the "nap" add alongside a complementary video touting Face ID over Touch ID on its main YouTube account. The second ad, a 30-second short, focuses on Face ID's speed and ease of use as compared to last-generation Touch ID authentication.



Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,212member
    Another way you can tell upgrades to new devices are slowing.
  • Reply 2 of 11
    EsquireCatsEsquireCats Posts: 668member
    This is probably one of the most underrated security and convenience features. Showing messages as notifications without any kind of authentication makes many banking websites use of SMS verification useless. There is also something very nice about just having to glance at your phone while it’s sitting in its dock for all of your notifications to unveil. Now we just need the iphone’s faceID to be as good as the ipad’s. 
    racerhomie3AppleExposed
  • Reply 3 of 11
    Dude, muster the energy to hit the mute switch, especially since your friend appears to be Moe Ron. 
    edited July 8
  • Reply 4 of 11
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,756member
    Another way you can tell upgrades to new devices are slowing.
    1) So you're claiming Apple hasn't advertised in the past? Really?

    2) Everyone has known that sales would slow eventually, as nothing lasts forever -- especially the most successful product in history.

    3) Boy you try so hard. 
    racerhomie3airnerdfastasleep
  • Reply 5 of 11
    seankillseankill Posts: 492member
    My problem with Face ID is when I am using my iPad on and off For reference, so it sits to the side. when I need to reopen it, I either need to lean my head way over for it to see me or just type in the code. I’ve started doing the latter. My 2017 with Touch ID was nicer for this use case, although I would say it was nicer for most use cases. Probably less of an issue with iPhones. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 6 of 11
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,486member
    I maintain Touch ID is still the superior alternative to a password, all things considered.
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 7 of 11
    freshmakerfreshmaker Posts: 530member
    My only gripe with FaceID and TouchID is that you still have to use your password from time to time anyway.  Why?  Doesn’t make any sense.  I have to punch that in once or twice a day.  Love the features otherwise - super convenient esp when using Apple Pay 
    AppleExposedtoysandme
  • Reply 8 of 11
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,719member
    I maintain Touch ID is still the superior alternative to a password, all things considered.
    Curious as to why? In my experience, FaceID is as fast or faster and there are fewer circumstances where FaceID fails than TouchID. To be sure, there are cases (protective eyewear, facemarks, etc) that cause FaceID to fail, but there were/are at least an equal number of cases where TouchID would fail (gloves, wet or sweaty hands, a cut or a bandaid on your thumb, etc,) and those cases tended to be more common. The only true advantage to TouchID was that I could unlock my phone without looking down at it, which was handy on occasion.

    My only gripe with FaceID and TouchID is that you still have to use your password from time to time anyway.  Why?  Doesn’t make any sense.  I have to punch that in once or twice a day.  Love the features otherwise - super convenient esp when using Apple Pay 
    A password is required if you haven't used FaceID for 48 hours. This drops to 4 hours after 6 ½ days. Also, if you simultaneously press the volume and power buttons or if there were 5 unsuccessful attempts to unlock with FaceID it will require a password. The last issue can easily happen without you realizing it, so that's probably what is triggering the password request in your case.
    toysandme
  • Reply 9 of 11
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,507member
    Dude, muster the energy to hit the mute switch, especially since your friend appears to be Moe Ron. 
    Another moron who stupidly believes his way is the only way. You're trying too hard, as well.
  • Reply 10 of 11
    Lazy? I sometimes have to Face ID three times to get myself recognized. Involves quite a bit of user attention. 
    And in bed I have to stick my face in the phone - bright AF - to get in. That used to be a touch.
    If in the car my phone gets locked, I have to take it off the cradle and stick my phone in my face (so safe!) to get in.

    FaceID can be really great, but when it doesn’t recognize you, it really, really sucks. 
    I hope the next iPhone will allow for Touch ID from the screen in additions to Face ID.
    toysandmeFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 11 of 11
    bestkeptsecretbestkeptsecret Posts: 3,415member
    MplsP said:
    I maintain Touch ID is still the superior alternative to a password, all things considered.
    Curious as to why? In my experience, FaceID is as fast or faster and there are fewer circumstances where FaceID fails than TouchID. To be sure, there are cases (protective eyewear, facemarks, etc) that cause FaceID to fail, but there were/are at least an equal number of cases where TouchID would fail (gloves, wet or sweaty hands, a cut or a bandaid on your thumb, etc,) and those cases tended to be more common. The only true advantage to TouchID was that I could unlock my phone without looking down at it, which was handy on occasion.
    I love the convenience of FaceID. The only place where TouchID is easier is when authorising purchases from the App Store or the iTMS. Just placing my finger on the TouchID sensor is much easier than clicking on the side button twice to activate FaceID.
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