Apple updates 'Sign in with Apple' & kids privacy rules for developers

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple has released new updates outlining the deadlines for implementing both "Sign in with Apple" as well as complying with Apple's new regulations for children's apps.

Sign in with Apple


Apple's developer page now shows two new updates, focusing on kids apps and Apple's new "Sign in With Apple" feature.

Apple has been cracking down on kids' apps since late May, tightening the security to help protect kids' data. New apps in the kids category are not allowed to include third-party advertising or analytics software and may not transmit any data to third parties.

Originally, existing apps were given until September 3 to comply with these new guidelines. Apple has now pushed the deadline back to March 3, a full five months of additional development time.

The second guideline focuses on "Sign in with Apple", Apple's new login feature. Apple now will require most new apps and app updates to use "Sign in with Apple" by April of 2020.

While most apps will be required to follow this, it's not going to be every app. For example, if an app utilizes proprietary government or industry-backed citizen identification or electronic ID to authenticate users, they won't need to use "Sign in with Apple."

Likewise, Business, enterprise, or educational apps that require users to sign in with an existing education or educational account will not need to implement "Sign in with Apple."

Social media, email, and other third-party content apps, such as Gmail or Twitter, will not need to comply with these new login regulations, either.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,862member
    Social media apps are exempt? Well that seems lame. As well as not having to implement till middle of next year. I was really looking fwd to this feature. Now, looks like probably none of the apps I use will even be required to use it..
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 3
    cornchip said:
    Social media apps are exempt? Well that seems lame. As well as not having to implement till middle of next year. I was really looking fwd to this feature. Now, looks like probably none of the apps I use will even be required to use it..
    The notice helped clarify what are a lot of common-sense exclusions.

    The function of the Sign in with Apple service is that it allows a user to not disclose their personal information for the many websites which arbitrarily request an account to be made. These websites seldomly provide anything in return for providing the personal information - it's used purely for their marketing/tracking.
    Facebook, Google, Twitter and others have realised that this was an opportunity to provide a low-friction sign-in service, which benefits them as they gain tracking data and further user insights. Users liked these options are they could quickly obtain access to a website. The compromise is that users were handing over more information than they are legitimately required to, something that adds up overtime. 

    However there are some websites were users are happy to hand over personal information, examples of these include social media. The user on social media is deliberately choosing to provide this information to the service. That's why it makes sense that Sign-in with Apple is not mandatory, since the service will be privy to the private information anyway. That's not a weakness in Apple's position, it's the reality that social media sites are designed to collect information about their users for the sake of selling advertising - that's not something Apple can change, but it is certainly something they are limiting once the user leaves the social media website.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 3
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,862member
    cornchip said:
    Social media apps are exempt? Well that seems lame. As well as not having to implement till middle of next year. I was really looking fwd to this feature. Now, looks like probably none of the apps I use will even be required to use it..
    The notice helped clarify what are a lot of common-sense exclusions.

    The function of the Sign in with Apple service is that it allows a user to not disclose their personal information for the many websites which arbitrarily request an account to be made. These websites seldomly provide anything in return for providing the personal information - it's used purely for their marketing/tracking.
    Facebook, Google, Twitter and others have realised that this was an opportunity to provide a low-friction sign-in service, which benefits them as they gain tracking data and further user insights. Users liked these options are they could quickly obtain access to a website. The compromise is that users were handing over more information than they are legitimately required to, something that adds up overtime. 

    However there are some websites were users are happy to hand over personal information, examples of these include social media. The user on social media is deliberately choosing to provide this information to the service. That's why it makes sense that Sign-in with Apple is not mandatory, since the service will be privy to the private information anyway. That's not a weakness in Apple's position, it's the reality that social media sites are designed to collect information about their users for the sake of selling advertising - that's not something Apple can change, but it is certainly something they are limiting once the user leaves the social media website.
    That’s fine, but when originally presented I was under the impression that any site or app that featured Facebook and/or Google login would be required to feature sign-in with Apple. I understand about schools & government  and all that, but now it’s looking like all these random social networking sites & apps like Nextdoor and letgo & dating apps will get a pass. Which I, think is LAME.
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
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