T-Mobile launches unlimited 5G Home Internet service

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 7
T-Mobile Home Internet is a new service that taps into the wireless carrier's 5G network to provide home broadband access and quick setup through a companion iOS app.

The T-Mobile Home Internet companion app allows for setup and personalization
The T-Mobile Home Internet companion app allows for setup and personalization


The service launches Wednesday, with more than 30 million U.S. households eligible to sign up. It only includes one plan, costing $60 per month without added taxes, fees, contracts, or equipment charges.

The carrier says most new customers will enjoy average speeds of up to 100 megabits per second. However, real-world 5G speeds on today's mobile devices -- including the iPhone 12 -- often fall far short of those lofty claims.

T-Mobile says Home Internet also lacks data caps, allowing for truly unlimited use.

The "Un-Carrier" will send a gateway router to customers who sign up for the service. The device has a simple setup, requiring only a power outlet and a central location.

T-Mobile sends a gateway device -- without extra fees -- for each eligible customer
T-Mobile sends a gateway device -- without extra fees -- for each eligible customer


The router includes a pre-installed SIM card, which will pick up a 5G connection and relay it as a local WiFi network. It also has a built-in battery, allowing users to move it around their homes to find the spot with the best signal.

The gateway device supports the WiFi 6 standard. The company says it can support up to 64 simultaneous device connections, and it includes two built-in Ethernet ports. The router will fall back to LTE speeds if it loses its 5G signal.

Not everyone can sign up yet. Availability depends on network capacity, something T-Mobile plans to increase over time. Users can enter their home address on T-Mobile's sign-up page to find out if they're eligible.

The Federal Communications Commission has estimated that 19 million Americans -- 6 percent of the population -- lack access to fixed high-speed broadband service. T-Mobile hopes its home broadband rollout will help fill in some of those gaps, combined with other wireless carriers and SpaceX's Starlink satellite broadband.

A group of U.S. senators recently called on the FCC to "establish a 21st century definition of high-speed broadband" of 100 Mbps for both uploads and downloads.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    jcohjcoh Posts: 10member
    T mobile 5G on my iPhone 12 Pro Max averages 250-300 mbps (Miami ,FL) and has peaked at just over 500.  I wonder if they are going to throttle the use and keep it in the 100 range.     If they don’t this sounds like a good option.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 9
    ralphieralphie Posts: 67member
    I’m lucky if I get 1 bar with t-mobile at my house. But the price is right, LOL.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 9
    Unlimited has been a staple of the operators for years here in Finland. I pay around $50 a month for 1000 M 5G. The US is way behind. 
    pulseimagesllamawatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    Fred257Fred257 Posts: 76member
    Comcast (a crappy horrible service) gets that for less now.  T Mobile is behind.  I use Visible for everything unlimited including home internet for $40.00 a month.  I’m not a troll either.  I had TMobile  for 10 years, they are crap since Legre left
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 9
    sergiozsergioz Posts: 338member
    Soon to be joining the likes of a trashcan! 
  • Reply 6 of 9
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,340member
    Quick note: just tested my iPhone 8's LTE speed.

    Result: 80Mbps.

    Soooo this (low-band) "5G" expects to deliver "up to" 100Mbps and will fall back to LTE when 5G signal is weak or not available.

    With the equipment lease, fees, taxes and such, you can expect that $60/mo to climb to around $80/month, easy.

    I can't speak for other people, but I'm presently paying $80/month for 300Mbps cable internet. YMMV.




    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 9
    rmfpdxrmfpdx Posts: 18member
    T-Mobile here in Portland OR metro area. 5G service is awful. No way would I want this to be my daily internet carrier. Just ran fast.com speed test on my iPhone 12 Pro Max with 5G active. Download "speed" was 2.5 Mbps. I'll stick with Xfinity for now at 150 Mpbs. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 9
    pairof9pairof9 Posts: 22member
    chasm said:
    Quick note: just tested my iPhone 8's LTE speed.

    Result: 80Mbps.

    Soooo this (low-band) "5G" expects to deliver "up to" 100Mbps and will fall back to LTE when 5G signal is weak or not available.

    With the equipment lease, fees, taxes and such, you can expect that $60/mo to climb to around $80/month, easy.

    I can't speak for other people, but I'm presently paying $80/month for 300Mbps cable internet. YMMV.




    I don't think you read the article fully: "...costing $60 per month without added taxes, fees, contracts, or equipment charges."
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 9
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 519member
    rmfpdx said:
    T-Mobile here in Portland OR metro area. 5G service is awful. No way would I want this to be my daily internet carrier. Just ran fast.com speed test on my iPhone 12 Pro Max with 5G active. Download "speed" was 2.5 Mbps. I'll stick with Xfinity for now at 150 Mpbs. 
    You may not be aware that fast.com is Netflix.  It measures your speed to Netflix.  A lot of mobile operators limit speed to Netflix, YouTube, and other streaming video services.  This is probably noted in your mobile service plan.  They don't mention limiting speed, but they state the maximum quality of streaming video your plan supports.  Of course the quality is based on speed of the connection to the video provider, therefore they limit the speed.

    Try a more neutral speed test site or better - if you are in the US, use the FCC Speed Test app.  It is from the FCC & about as neutral as you can get.
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
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