Fewer Android users switching to 'iPhone 13' because of CSAM scan, no Touch ID

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 2021
Android users are less likely to make the switch to Apple with the launch of the "iPhone 13," a survey claims, with the move away from Touch ID and Apple's CSAM controversy apparently among the top reasons for not switching ecosystems.




In early August, a survey claimed 43.7% of iPhone users planned to make the switch to the inbound "iPhone 13." In another survey targeting Android users, it seems that fewer people are prepared to make the switch as part of their next smartphone upgrade.

According to the survey by SellCell, only 18.3% of Android users are willing to make the switch over to the "iPhone 13" for their next upgrade. The vast majority of respondents, 81.7%, said they were not interested in getting a new iPhone.

The variance is a bit of a step down for the iPhone, as a similar survey from 2020 said nearly 33% of Android users were considering an iPhone 12 for their next upgrade.

Of those who said "no" to switching in 2021's survey, a follow-up question was asked, requesting to know why they didn't want to switch.

Top of the list was a "lack of fingerprint reader," which scored 31.9% of the vote. Fingerprints are still the main form of biometric identification in Android devices, though it is unclear exactly why Face ID is shunned by the voters in favor of the removed Touch ID.

Second and third place in the list are that iOS "offers very little customizability" (16.7%) and "no support for sideloading apps" (12.8%). Apple prohibits the use of third-party launchers and sideloading for security reasons, but it is making iOS easier to personalize with successive releases.

A claim that "Android phones have better hardware" takes up the fourth spot at 12.1%, which is odd considering the copious reports about the high performance of Apple's chip designs in comparison to rivals.

The "Intrusive iCloud photo scanning for Child Sexual Abuse Material or CSAM" is in the top half of the list at 10.4%. The inclusion of the option in the list may be in response to repeated misguided claims that Apple's CSAM tools erode privacy and may enable surveillance for governments down the road, likely caused by misinformed public outcry overestimating the system's capabilities. Furthermore, Google also performs the scanning -- albeit not on-device.

Other complaints include how "iPhones are expensive" (4.5%), the preference for Google Assistant over Siri (2.6%) despite the former being accessible on iOS, and "No support or multiple user profiles (1.5%.)

Also on the hardware front, some users say they "prefer an older iPhone model" (3.9%) over what they expect from the "iPhone 13." A lack of a foldable device is also an issue, albeit for only 0.8% of respondents, despite occasional issues surfacing.

Of those looking to make the move to the iPhone, some reasons run counter to the complaints. The "better privacy protection" and "upcoming child safety features" received 11.4% and 0.9% of the vote respectively, while 4.3% say the iPhone will have better hardware features, and 5.2% claim iPhones have "better prices."

At the top of the list is "Longer software support" with a massive 51.4% and "Apple ecosystem integration" at 23.8%. This is likely due to how Android devices are heavily fragmented in their operating system updates and feature adoption, while Apple is direct to consumers with its update releases.

When asked which model they want to upgrade to, most Android users said they would go for the "iPhone 13 Pro Max", at 39.8%, narrowly beating the standard model at 36.1%. Third place was the "iPhone 13 Pro" with 19.5%, and the "iPhone 13 mini rounded out the list with 4.6%.

The survey is based on the responses from more than 5,000 Android users aged 18 or over, based in the United States.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    ikirikir Posts: 127member
    And misinformation worked great! Google scan photos with human interaction, Apple created a complex system based on mathematical hashes with multi DB from different organisations, all to  guarantee privacy... and users now have fear to use Apple and will instead use Google services with much less privacy and actual photo scan.
    ravnorodomretrogustobuttesilvermagman1979jony0
  • Reply 2 of 33
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,508member
    ikir said:
    And misinformation worked great! Google scan photos with human interaction, Apple created a complex system based on mathematical hashes with multi DB from different organisations, all to  guarantee privacy... and users now have fear to use Apple and will instead use Google services with much less privacy and actual photo scan.
    Google uses hash-scanning to identify CSAM, same as Apple uses hash-scanning to identify it. The difference is where that takes place, on your personal device or on company property.
    muthuk_vanalingamOctoMonkeybuttesilverbeowulfschmidtchemengin1baconstangIreneWjony0
  • Reply 3 of 33
    BeatsBeats Posts: 3,073member
    Called it yesterday. 


    If Apple drops CSAM scanning the iPhone 13 would be huge.
  • Reply 4 of 33
    retrogustoretrogusto Posts: 1,026member
    Top of the list was a "lack of fingerprint reader," which scored 31.9% of the vote. Fingerprints are still the main form of biometric identification in Android devices, though it is unclear exactly why Face ID is shunned by the voters in favor of the removed Touch ID.

    Touch ID works with masks, Face ID doesn’t (yet). It’s a significant issue, and it doesn’t look like it will be disappearing in the immediate future. Not significant enough that I would consider switching to Android for it—if anything, I’d just get an SE, which is a great phone and an incredible bargain—but if you don’t understand why anyone would want Touch ID these days, there is at least one very good reason. 


    muthuk_vanalingambaconstang
  • Reply 5 of 33
    BeatsBeats Posts: 3,073member
    ikir said:
    And misinformation worked great! Google scan photos with human interaction, Apple created a complex system based on mathematical hashes with multi DB from different organisations, all to  guarantee privacy... and users now have fear to use Apple and will instead use Google services with much less privacy and actual photo scan.

    Why would I buy an iPhone when I can buy a knockoff from Samsung that does the same thing?

    This is how people think. They don’t care about details. Once Apple throws privacy out the window there’s less difference.

    For context, the biggest Apple fan I know personally, told me “I heard Apple can look through your photos”. The Apple forum nerd is the .01%, maybe less. The mass majority see “Apple doesn’t care about privacy” and buys a 80 bucks knockoff because it does the same thing. 
  • Reply 6 of 33
    mrstepmrstep Posts: 486member
    The inclusion of the option in the list may be in response to repeated misguided claims that Apple's CSAM tools erode privacy and may enable surveillance for governments down the road, likely caused by misinformed public outcry overestimating the system's capabilities. Furthermore, Google also performs the scanning — albeit not on-device.

    The claims - from essentially every privacy group - that it's likely to be abused in the future because it enables client side scanning isn't a "misguided claim", it's almost inevitable once the ability is added.  It's just a question of what it will "protect" us from next.

    "Google also performs the scanning" - because what, we look to Google as a shining light of privacy protection?  "albeit not on-device."  Right, usually when some third-party software is scanning your files, it's malware or a virus, not the company selling you the phone.  It's arguable that you shouldn't have private companies scanning your files as part of storage solutions, but with the secret letters that agencies use to access content, that ship has sailed.

    It's unclear why AI is cheerleading something that will 99.999% likely end up eroding privacy protections - and in the best case doesn't improve your privacy.  They could scan iCloud content like everyone else scans their respective cloud files and at least not end up being worse. (Hell, they could use the hash, # of hits, review method all server side.)
    beowulfschmidtmuthuk_vanalingamOferbaconstangJapheymagman1979
  • Reply 7 of 33
    I was really hoping Touch ID would be added again.
    rotateleftbyteM68000
  • Reply 8 of 33
    omasouomasou Posts: 406member
    I was at a concert the other day, where people were recording and uploading to Instagram, etc.

    The difference between the iPhone and Android screens was unbelievable. Granted some of the Androids may have been less expensive models but the difference in quality was HUGE. The Android phones that I saw people using had dull, muddy screens, that I couldn't imagine using.
    magman1979jony0
  • Reply 9 of 33
    No TouchID means no sale for me. I'll get by with my iPhone 8 for another year.

    Apple-a-dayM68000
  • Reply 10 of 33
    dm3dm3 Posts: 168member
    “repeated misguided claims that Apple's CSAM tools erode privacy and may enable surveillance for governments down the road”

    Appleinsiders repeated claims that it doesn’t erode privacy is misguided and misses the point. 
    Apple-a-daymuthuk_vanalingamOferbaconstangmrstep
  • Reply 11 of 33
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Beats said:
    Called it yesterday. 


    If Apple drops CSAM scanning the iPhone 13 would be huge.
    The 10% of Android users who state it as their reason for not switching will have other reasons.  It'd make jack all difference.
    sireofseth
  • Reply 12 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,314member
    “ a survey claims”? This article is contrived bullshit. The proof is in the pudding in the comments so far, all bias confirmation. The reasons stated are as old as the hills. Let’s list them...

    1. Lack of TouchID

    2. Customization

    3. Sideloading

    4. Overpriced

    Complaints we’ve heard for years from the same critics right here in AI. Now we add CSAM to the list. And I only hear this stuff from Android techie wannabes, likely the source of this survey. Normal people probably use Android because it’s cheaper, they got a ‘deal’ from the carrier, not because of CSAM or sideloading. The converse is probably also true. People use iOS because their friends do, they got a ‘deal’ from their carrier, not because of security, privacy, or any of the other bullet points.

    Remember the text in the first paragraph   “a survey claims”. iOS is gaining share in the U.S., not losing it.

    Now let’s see AI come up with the mirror survey of why iOS users aren’t switching to Android
    muthuk_vanalingammagman1979jony0
  • Reply 13 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,314member
    Beats said:
    ikir said:
    And misinformation worked great! Google scan photos with human interaction, Apple created a complex system based on mathematical hashes with multi DB from different organisations, all to  guarantee privacy... and users now have fear to use Apple and will instead use Google services with much less privacy and actual photo scan.

    Why would I buy an iPhone when I can buy a knockoff from Samsung that does the same thing?

    This is how people think. They don’t care about details. Once Apple throws privacy out the window there’s less difference.

    For context, the biggest Apple fan I know personally, told me “I heard Apple can look through your photos”. The Apple forum nerd is the .01%, maybe less. The mass majority see “Apple doesn’t care about privacy” and buys a 80 bucks knockoff because it does the same thing. 
    So can we assume you will be buying knockoffs in the future. If you don't you’re the biggest hypocrite in the history of hypocrisy. 
    magman1979jony0
  • Reply 14 of 33
    zimmiezimmie Posts: 628member
    mrstep said:
    > The inclusion of the option in the list may be in response to repeated misguided claims that Apple's CSAM tools erode privacy and may enable surveillance for governments down the road, likely caused by misinformed public outcry overestimating the system's capabilities. Furthermore, Google also performs the scanning — albeit not on-device.

    The claims - from essentially every privacy group - that it's likely to be abused in the future because it enables client side scanning isn't a "misguided claim", it's almost inevitable once the ability is added.  It's just a question of what it will "protect" us from next.

    "Google also performs the scanning" - because what, we look to Google as a shining light of privacy protection?  "albeit not on-device."  Right, usually when some third-party software is scanning your files, it's malware or a virus, not the company selling you the phone.  It's arguable that you shouldn't have private companies scanning your files as part of storage solutions, but with the secret letters that agencies use to access content, that ship has sailed.

    It's unclear why AI is cheerleading something that will 99.999% likely end up eroding privacy protections - and in the best case doesn't improve your privacy.  They could scan iCloud content like everyone else scans their respective cloud files and at least not end up being worse. (Hell, they could use the hash, # of hits, review method all server side.)
    It's a misguided claim because if it were inevitable, we would have seen Spotlight abused in such ways already. It's explicitly designed to search through all the stuff on your phone, after all. It could be trivially modified to alert Apple if you wrote a bomb threat in Notes or Messages.

    The CSAM scanning is less invasive than Steam, the DRM platform and game store. The Steam client reports on software you have installed, as well as whether the copy of a game you're trying to run was purchased under your account or not (i.e., whether you may have committed a crime). Don't want to be subject to such scanning? Don't buy stuff on Steam.

    Don't want to be subject to the CSAM scanning? Don't sync photos to iCloud.

    That said, other applications like OneDrive can recognize new photos and automatically upload them to the associated service if you want. I think it would probably be best from a messaging perspective if iCloud photo sync were spun out into a separate application like that. Then, if you don't want the CSAM scanning code to even be present on your phone, you just remove (or don't install) the iCloud photo sync application.
    Oferbaconstangmagman1979fastasleepjony0
  • Reply 15 of 33
    royboyroyboy Posts: 452member
    No TouchID means no sale for me. I'll get by with my iPhone 8 for another year.

    Same here, with my iPhone 7 Plus.  Once it became, mostly apparent, that iPhone 13 would not have Touch ID added, I recently put a new battery in my iPhone 7 Plus.  Almost like getting a new phone!
    M68000
  • Reply 16 of 33
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,016member
    Beats said:
    Called it yesterday. 


    If Apple drops CSAM scanning the iPhone 13 would be huge.
    I keep reading this from people, but unless I'm really missing it, where does it say that CSAM is going to scan photos stored locally on one's iPhone?  Everything I've read says it's scanned on iCloud accounts on Apple's own servers, NOT individual iPhones which is what all other cloud providers do already.
    magman1979jony0
  • Reply 17 of 33
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    sflocal said:
    Beats said:
    Called it yesterday. 


    If Apple drops CSAM scanning the iPhone 13 would be huge.
    I keep reading this from people, but unless I'm really missing it, where does it say that CSAM is going to scan photos stored locally on one's iPhone?  Everything I've read says it's scanned on iCloud accounts on Apple's own servers, NOT individual iPhones which is what all other cloud providers do already.
    https://www.apple.com/child-safety/

    To help address this, new technology in iOS and iPadOS* will allow Apple to detect known CSAM images stored in iCloud Photos. This will enable Apple to report these instances to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC). NCMEC acts as a comprehensive reporting center for CSAM and works in collaboration with law enforcement agencies across the United States.

    Apple’s method of detecting known CSAM is designed with user privacy in mind. Instead of scanning images in the cloud, the system performs on-device matching using a database of known CSAM image hashes provided by NCMEC and other child safety organizations. Apple further transforms this database into an unreadable set of hashes that is securely stored on users’ devices.

    There's a lot of detail in the linked documents about what they're doing.  The hash check against the CSAM database happens on-device.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 18 of 33
    magman1979magman1979 Posts: 1,265member
    I can see all the tinfoil hat morons are out in full-force in ANY article regarding CSAM, regardless of their understanding or not, fucking pathetic

    For for those of you not wanting a new iPhone unless it comes with Touch ID, GET THE FUCK OVER IT! Face ID is what, 50x more secure than Touch ID was, and with an Apple Watch now allows unlock with a mask on?

    You fools are just that, FUCKING FOOLS
    edited August 2021 fastasleepjony0
  • Reply 19 of 33
    Beside Android users I will not switching from iOS 14 to iOS 15 and will not replace my iPhone 12 Pro with a 13 Pro.
    I would be fine with CSAM scanning in iCloud, but will not pay for a device with spyware installed.
    edited August 2021 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 20 of 33
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,454member
    Maybe fewer Android users are switching to iPhone because most of those people on the fence have done so already. A far more telling illustration of the importance CSAM scanning and TouchID have in the decision making of smartphone purchasers would be in a survey of iPhone users thinking of switching to Android. Over/under: 18.3%?
    edited August 2021 fastasleep
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