gordoncy

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gordoncy
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  • Swallowed AirPod sends 7-year-old to emergency room

    No doubt it will pass, but are the doctors aware that it contains a deadly 93 milliwatt hour battery, which can burn a hole in the stomach if it melts. E.g. Toddler, 2, swallowed a battery which burned a hole in his throat and left him unable to eat https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3442518/Toddler-2-swallowed-battery-burned-hole-throat-left-unable-eat.html
    macpluspluszroger73watto_cobra
  • EU lawmakers snub Apple's pleas, overwhelmingly vote to push for charging cable standard

    Had the law been there yesterday, micro USB would have stuck with us forever, preventing innovations such as MagSav. Now, USB-C has been declared the last wired charging standard.
    tmaydanhGeorgeBMac
  • Inside iOS 11: Apple's 'Do Not Disturb While Driving' keeps you safe on the road

    Hey Siri, I am riding on a bus... Let me put all 10 fingers on your face. Are you convinced yet?
    king editor the gratecgWerks
  • Qualcomm says Apple's software workarounds undermine case against US iPhone ban [u]

    dewme said:
    It would be nice if Qualcomm and Apple would focus on resolving their business relationships through negotiation at the CEO level. Constantly resorting to using the legal system as a club to attack those you can not or will not talk to is a sign of weakness and ineffectual leadership. What the hell are these so-called leaders being paid for if they cannot solve fundamental business problems on their own? When did so-called leaders of industry become nothing more than utterly pathetic hood ornaments? 
    This is not a fundamental business problem. Qualcomm wants to be allowed to continue in its illegal and anti competitive pricing scheme. When they got investigated over this, Apple provided factual information that they are breaking the law. They decided to punish Apple for not lying, covering up or supporting their scheme. Qualcomm figured, bet the farm really, that Apple would kowtow like so many other companies had before. When Apple didn’t and it became clear that Qualcomm’s usual bullying tactics of threats and fear of legal fees/adverse outcome (Apple can outlast them and more importantly it can afford to lose) were not going to work they collectively shit themselves (oh to be a fly on the wall in that boardroom). They have no way out; there are really only two outcomes.

    1) Most likely. The case is taken to its conclusion and they lose. In this case its game over for them. They have already lost Apple’s future business. Government penalties, civil suits from their other clients who have been similarly fleeced and, critically, being forced to offer terms that are compliant with the law going forward. While they may not necessarily go out of business, Qualcomm will be a mere shadow of it’s former self. Stock price will plummet and it’s shareholders will come seeking blood. They could have left well enough a lone, but sadly hubris and blind greed will have done in the company.

    2) They get Apple to drop it’s suit and parlay that into a successful defense against the government suit. It stands to reason they could pull this off especially if Apple were to stand down as it would give validation to their licensing scheme. This outcome would represent the closest return to the status quo which is going to save the executives their jobs as the bulk of Qualcomm’s income will be preserved (the fleecing continues). They might even increase in value as they would be unlikely to be challenged again. Qualcomm really wants this outcome, but realistically the only way this happens is a sweeping ban that is so catastrophic to Apple’s bottom line it would be forced to comply.

    How do you deal with a company that takes the stance “I will do what I want because I can, even if it is illegal”. Answer is you can’t, behavior like this only exists because the people who engage in it are not held accountable. The parallels to current political situation in the US is uncanny.
    Agree, too easy to put shareholder interest above the law, especially the loophole that you can steal, give it away, make no money and not worth being sued, like Sun vs Google for Android, or Netscape vs Microsoft for IE
    watto_cobra