VRing

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VRing
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  • First look: Benchmarks put Apple's entry-level $4999 iMac Pro to the test

    wizard69 said:
    The thermal throttling is a huge problem in a professional machine.   Sadly AI is seeing throttling in extremely light usage imagine how much you would loose over 8 hours. 

    Frankly this is not unexpected!   Apples history with the word "pro" and cramming hot parts into a tight enclosure isnt good.  Every day im becoming more and more convinced that Apple just doesnt understand the "PRO" market.   

    As a point of record i was looking at a iPad Pro in a store yesterday.    Nice device but there is nothing about it that stands out as being pro.   I do believe that common sense has left the building at Apple and has been replaced by marketing morons that likely have never engaged in professional work.  Sad.  
    This is more of a Final Cut Pro machine than a real workstation, and not because it's the best option, but because it's the only option.

    Then again, I'm not sure what anyone really expected from an all-in-one. 
    xzumuthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonmarkaceto
  • T2 chip in iMac Pro & 2018 MacBook Pro controls boot, security functions previously manage...

    macxpress said:
    Hey @VRing, does that supposed magical and revolutionary custom build of yours that is SO much better than an iMac Pro do this? Didn't think so and never will! 
    I know you're just flaming, but TPM chips have been in the vast majority of Windows computers and motherboards for enterprise use for years. As well, a number of these types of computers have a self-healing BIOS to restore a corrupt or potentially attacked BIOS.
    williamlondonxzuAvieshekmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Apple apologizes for iPhone slowdown controversy, will reduce out-of-warranty battery repl...

    knowitall said:
    Reminds me of ‘VW defeat device scandal’.
    The end result was a performance loss and a certain amount of money back.

    Both Apple and VW only acted after getting caught. If not they would have both continued without the consumer's knowledge.
    ZooMigodysamoriawilliamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamsingularityrepressthis
  • Apple apologizes for iPhone slowdown controversy, will reduce out-of-warranty battery repl...

    They're only doing this after they got caught, and it still doesn't help users that already changed devices.
    dasanman69digitolZooMigoraclark77williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamtechprod1gyrepressthisbr
  • Watch: 5K gaming on an iMac Pro

    Those drivers definitely need some work.

    On a different note, as you have Boot Camp up and running, can see some SPEC workstation benchmarks now? SolidWorks, NX, Maya, Creo, etc.

    https://www.spec.org/benchmarks.html


    crogers said:
    I shall use mine for gaming, just trying to decide if I should upgrade to the better GPU!
    You have to ask yourself if the extra $600 is worth it. Will you benefit from extra VRAM? Both cards are already downclocked.

    Top: iMac Pro 8 core / 32 GB with Vega 64
    Bottom: iMac Pro 8 core / 32 GB with Vega 56 





    Apple Insider saw a 10% throttle for the Vega 56 GPU after 15 minutes at load, that might be even worse for the Vega 64 version.
    Unfortunately there isn't a way for us to check the frequency of the Vega 56 under MacOS, but at the end of our 15-minute test, the last graphics score we received was 1667 with an average 66 frames per second. This is roughly 10 percent lower than the score of 1831 we received when running the benchmark by itself, where the CPU isn't also being maxed at the same time.

    To ensure that this performance loss wasn't due to limited CPU power going to the graphics benchmark, we monitored the percentage of CPU performance Unigine Heaven was receiving. In both the isolated graphics test and simultaneous CPU and GPU benchmarks Unigine was receiving the same 5 percent to 7 percent of processing power, meaning that a 10 percent lower score is likely from the graphics chip throttling itself in order to keep the system from getting too hot. 

    xzuwilliamlondondysamoria
  • T2 chip in iMac Pro & 2018 MacBook Pro controls boot, security functions previously manage...

    chia said:
    VRing said:
    chia said:
    VRing said:
    macxpress said:
    Hey @VRing, does that supposed magical and revolutionary custom build of yours that is SO much better than an iMac Pro do this? Didn't think so and never will! 
    I know you're just flaming, but TPM chips have been in the vast majority of Windows computers and motherboards for enterprise use for years. As well, a number of these types of computers have a self-healing BIOS to restore a corrupt or potentially attacked BIOS.
    Apple has been using EFI/UEFI right from its first Intel-based Mac in 2005, it may have even been the first to ship consumer x86 Intel systems that used EFI/UEFI.  No production Mac has ever used BIOS; can’t vouch for what was used on the computers in Apple’s labs for their Star Trek project, the one where they ran System 7 on PC-compatible hardware.

    It amuses me that VRing conflates UEFI with BIOS.  UEFI is far more advanced in what it does compared to outdated BIOS.
    I knew the moment that Windows PC manufacturers started making their systems using UEFI that people would continue to lazily and confusingly use the term BIOS in systems where it’s absent.
    It's not anyone being lazy. BIOS can still be exposed in Class 2 UEFI. Class 3 or 3+ devices (Surface Book, etc.) expose only UEFI at runtime. My mention of self-healing was with respect to older systems for enterprise and a history of these secure features.
    Sorry but you are one of those that is confused, VRing.  The Surface Book uses only UEFI.  UEFI devices can have a mode where they emulate a BIOS boot for legacy operating systems, but UEFI isn't BIOS.
    I'm not saying UEFI is BIOS. I'm saying that Class 2 (or lower) will still expose a BIOS interface. Due to this, the terminology has remained. 

    I said:  "Class 3 or 3+ devices (Surface Book, etc.) expose only UEFI at runtime."
    You said: "
    The Surface Book uses only UEFI."

    You should read that again. We're saying the same thing with regards to Class 3 devices, the BIOS interface  is no more at that level.

    xzumuthuk_vanalingam
  • South Korea probes Apple's decision to slow down iPhones with weak batteries

    lkrupp said:
    jd_in_sb said:
    Apple’s intentions were good but I can see how some will view it as a sinister upgrade scheme. People love conspiracies. 
    Yeah, well let them try to prove a ‘sinister upgrade scheme’ in a court of law. Conspiracy theories don’t hold water with a judge. And by the way, George W Bush (43) ordered the levies blown in New Orleans when Katrina hit. It was a sinister plot to kill poor people.
    ^Dismissing as a conspiracy theory.
    lkrupp said:
    Oh my, South Korea, home to Samsung, is asking Apple to explain themselves. Wow, that one came out of nowhere.
    ^Deflecting because South Korea and Samsung.

    What nonsense. How toxic of you.

    So here are the facts:
    • Apple slowed performance of iPhone models with degraded batteries (seen within a year of release).
    • Apple didn't tell anyone, not even Apple Store staff.
    • Users, some of which had been / are under warranty, had not been made aware that a battery replacement would remedy performance issues.
    sgunderson94muthuk_vanalingamsingularityaylk
  • Editorial: The super exciting failure of CES 2018

    JanNL said:
    Appreciate your piece about CES. But when it's that bad, why is AI putting out so many articles about (great) products? ;)
    Because this author is referring to the journalists hired by the Associated Press, Bloomberg, CNET and Reuters as "amateur bloggers". No idea who wrote this article (it doesn't say), but my guess it's not done by a journalist.

    fastasleepcornchipredgeminipa
  • Samsung's Exynos 9810 mobile processor follows Apple's A11 chip with machine learning feat...

    To give everyone an idea of performance based on Samsung's claims:

    Apple A10 (iPhone 7 Plus)

    -Geekbench Single Core: 3,438
    -Geekbench Multi Core: 5,723
    -3DMark Sling Shot Extreme (Metal): 1,986

    Exynos 8895 (Galaxy S8)

    -Geekbench Single Core: 1,956
    -Geekbench Multi Core: 6,432
    -3DMark Sling Shot Extreme (OpenGL): 3,142

    Apple A11 (iPhone X)

    -Geekbench Single Core: 4,203
    -Geekbench Multi Core: 10,103
    -3DMark Sling Shot Extreme (Metal): 2,691

    Exynos 9810 (expected performance)

    -Geekbench Single Core: 3,912 (2x performance increase)
    -Geekbench Multi Core: 9,005 (1.4x performance increase)
    -3DMark Sling Shot Extreme (OpenGL): 3,770 (1.2x performance increase)

    Geekbench values: https://browser.geekbench.com/
    3DMark values: https://www.futuremark.com/hardware/mobile

    It looks like Samsung will extend their graphics lead and start approaching Apple in single core and multi core performance. It's clear that Apple has a decent lead in CPU performance.
    muthuk_vanalingamaegean
  • T2 chip in iMac Pro & 2018 MacBook Pro controls boot, security functions previously manage...

    chia said:
    VRing said:
    macxpress said:
    Hey @VRing, does that supposed magical and revolutionary custom build of yours that is SO much better than an iMac Pro do this? Didn't think so and never will! 
    I know you're just flaming, but TPM chips have been in the vast majority of Windows computers and motherboards for enterprise use for years. As well, a number of these types of computers have a self-healing BIOS to restore a corrupt or potentially attacked BIOS.
    Apple has been using EFI/UEFI right from its first Intel-based Mac in 2005, it may have even been the first to ship consumer x86 Intel systems that used EFI/UEFI.  No production Mac has ever used BIOS; can’t vouch for what was used on the computers in Apple’s labs for their Star Trek project, the one where they ran System 7 on PC-compatible hardware.

    It amuses me that VRing conflates UEFI with BIOS.  UEFI is far more advanced in what it does compared to outdated BIOS.
    I knew the moment that Windows PC manufacturers started making their systems using UEFI that people would continue to lazily and confusingly use the term BIOS in systems where it’s absent.
    It's not anyone being lazy. BIOS can still be exposed in Class 2 UEFI. Class 3 or 3+ devices (Surface Book, etc.) expose only UEFI at runtime. My mention of self-healing was with respect to older systems for enterprise and a history of these secure features.
    xzu