atomic101

About

Username
atomic101
Joined
Visits
57
Last Active
Roles
member
Points
220
Badges
0
Posts
112
  • Apple releases iOS 12.4.2 for older iPhone & iPad, alongside watchOS 5.3.2

    I am on the fence about the 13.1 update on my iPhone SE, and I almost wonder if remaining on iOS 12 would have been better in the end.  Despite the claims of many reviews, I've found that the update has impacted the performance of the device.  The UI and scrolling have taken a hit, and even swiping between the home screen pages causes noticeable judder.  While most of the native Apple apps seem to work fine, some third party apps exhibit significant slowdown (i.e. the NHL app).  I wonder if the additional OS memory and multitasking overhead has finally overwhelmed the SE's specs.
    zroger73jahbladedysamoriawilliamlondon
  • Apple releases iOS 12.4.2 for older iPhone & iPad, alongside watchOS 5.3.2

    iOS works beautifully on my SE. Sure, there are a few minor bugs, like any other OS.
    I wish I could say the same.  It works beautifully on my iPad Pro, but not as much on my phone.  Hopefully future updates to the OS and apps alleviates this concern.  But right now it almost feels like my SE is running in "Low Power Mode" for the battery.  Will keep my hopes up!
    dysamoriawilliamlondon
  • iOS 11.3 coming this spring with battery and performance settings, ARKit 1.5, new Animoji

    MacPro said:
    "  ... including the ability to toggle the power management feature for iPhone models with aging batteries."  The toggle should say 'Sensible mode' and 'Idiot mode.'
    False. But kudos for the pretentious name calling. 

    The insistence that the throttlling is only for old batteries is inaccurate. Unless you consider a one year old battery with no prior instances of performance issues to be fair game for a 50-66% CPU downclock. 
    williamlondonfeudalistmuthuk_vanalingamkestraldysamoria
  • Review: 'Apple Pencil 2' is a huge step forward but still not perfect

    Apple Pencil 2 is night and day better than the original, likely what Apple should have shipped the first time 
    Every time I see this comment anywhere I point out how absurd it is -- products don't spring forth out of clam shells, fully-formed. They require iterations to get better. Is today's Mac what the first Macintosh should have been? Is today's Porsche what the first Porsche should have been? Etc. It doesn't work that way. Products evolve and get better over time. I have the first Pencil and it does exactly what it's supposed to do, and I haven't lost the cap, destroyed the tips, etc. It does its job. And now, the Pencil 2 does that job better. As it should.
    Except we’re not talking decades or generations between Apple pencils as in your examples. The phrase is not absurd given its context. The first pencil, especially with its inelegant charging solution, shows signs of a rushed product or lack of forthought. Surely, this is the product Apple should have come closer to realizing on its first attempt. They’re not amateurs in the industry, after all. 
    MplsPdysamoriaelijahgwilliamlondon
  • iOS 11.3 coming this spring with battery and performance settings, ARKit 1.5, new Animoji


    atomic101 said:
    MacPro said:
    "  ... including the ability to toggle the power management feature for iPhone models with aging batteries."  The toggle should say 'Sensible mode' and 'Idiot mode.'
    False. But kudos for the pretentious name calling. 

    The insistence that the throttlling is only for old batteries is inaccurate. Unless you consider a one year old battery with no prior instances of performance issues to be fair game for a 50-66% CPU downclock. 
    False, the throttling is far from 55% let alone 66%!!! Mine was less than 12% before the battery replacement. 30% when on high usage activities.

    And IT IS idiotic choosing constant random resets and app crashes over a small decrease in performance.

    If it bothers you so much just change the old depleted battery for cheap with Apple.

    Very worth it!
    With replacing the battery, now that Apple will "let" me officially replace the battery, it is certainly in my agenda of things to do. I previously tried to have it replaced and was told that my battery was within tolerances of Apple's diagnostics and that they would not change it, but this was before Apple announced the battery program. Mind you, I went there with the full intent to pay the original $79 for the service - I wasn't asking for a free/warranty replacement. 

    I am tempted to wait until this new iOS update is released to test the battery analysis options prior to changing it out.  Part of it is just curiousity and the techie in me, but then I can at least validate how much of an "idiot" I am. 😉
    muthuk_vanalingamdysamoriacgWerks
  • French fine Apple $27 million for battery patch that could slow down old iPhones

    larrya said:
    You guys are pathetic.  Apple cut performance by more than 50% and didn't bother telling anyone, and yet in Apple stores customers were told their batteries were fine, even refusing to provide paid replacements, and were encouraged to purchase new phones.  This is fraud, and the prosecutor's conclusion is uncontested by Apple.  You can love their products, as I do, without wearing blinders.
    Actually you're pathetic: Apple didn't cut performance by 50% and CPU throttling has always been a device management strategy in the iPhone.

    1. iPhones already throttled peak performance prior to these patches. E.g. For temperature extremes and preserving battery life.
    2. The changes in iOS 10.2 and 11.2 extended the CPU throttling features to untenable battery scenarios - i.e. situations which would normally turn off the device. Apple acknowledged that unexpected shutdowns were being addressed at the time.
    3. The most common worst case scenario resulted in a geek bench score of 2,500 being reduced to 1,500 during a peak load. The device operated at "normal" speeds during other times when the battery was able to supply sufficient power, or not under a stressful load.

    Apple cut performance by more than 50%
    Not only was peak load not reduced by 50%, but normal device usage was unaffected. Your comment lends to the idea that the phone was suddenly half as fast as before the update - there is no foundation for that.

    ...and didn't bother telling anyone
    It was literally in Apple's statements about the update: "With iOS 10.2.1, Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone."

    Of all the devices tested in Geek bench 4 under iOS 10.2.1, the overwhelming majority had no change in performance and the average decrease in peak performance due to the new changes was ~10 - 15% 

    So yeah your post is total sensationalist crap, and I think that's pathetic.


    "3. The most common worst case scenario resulted in a geek bench score of 2,500 being reduced to 1,500 during a peak load. The device operated at "normal" speeds during other times when the battery was able to supply sufficient power, or not under a stressful load."


    I can attest to this being wrong.  My device (iPhone SE) would function at 50% CPU speed and STAY that way.  No matter if the device was fully charged or plugged in.  This from a battery that still tested "ok" by Apple techs.  The situation only resolved itself after Apple admitted to their shennanigans and I was "allowed" to replace my battery.   I posted before and after screenshots two years ago indicating this.  THIS is where my bitterness still stems from...

    People here are so defensive about the company.  Sometimes even fans need to take their blinders off every now and then.





    avon b7muthuk_vanalingam
  • French fine Apple $27 million for battery patch that could slow down old iPhones

    sflocal said:
    crowley said:
    larrya said:
    You guys are pathetic.  Apple cut performance by more than 50% and didn't bother telling anyone, and yet in Apple stores customers were told their batteries were fine, even refusing to provide paid replacements, and were encouraged to purchase new phones.  This is fraud, and the prosecutor's conclusion is uncontested by Apple.  You can love their products, as I do, without wearing blinders.
    QFT
    This is a classic example of someone able to troll on a forum and try passing off their unfounded, agenda-driven drivel as fact when clearly the poster is about as accurate as a flat-earther.

    Sure, it could have been handled better in terms of communication, but everything you are implying (as fact) is just pure nonsense.  This has nothing to do with Apple-fanboyism and everything to do about setting the truth straight.  There is so much fake-news out there that needs to be called-out when people like you come out blazing with fake-news.
    Some of it seems to be an exaggeration, but I can confirm that the, "customers were told their batteries were fine, even refusing to provide paid replacements" part was true for me - see previous posts.  They didn't encourage me to purchase a new phone, but their refusal to allow me to even pay the $79 (the price at the time) to replace my battery was simply unbelievable to me.

    I can understand the skepticism... but don't be so certain that it's a false statement.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Apple unveils new iPad mini with updated design, 5G

    Graeme000 said:
    Eric_WVGG said:
    elijahg said:
    At $499 vs $329 for the bigger iPad, I don't really see what the point of this is, aside from some barely noticeable CPU speed bumps vs the bigger one. Since you probably own an iPhone anyway, you could just get an iPhone 12/13 Plus for $200 more when you next upgrade, saving ~$200 (or $350 if you need cellular), have just one device rather than two, and you're not that far off iPad mini display size. The only major disadvantage is no pencil on iPhone.
    Right, but then I'd have to carry around a huge iPhone, and that huge iPhone would be too small to be a good iPad. What you're suggesting makes 0 (zero) sense.
    Totally agree. I've used the original iPad mini for years and looking to replace it now with the new one. I'm using it mostly for lecture notes while teaching and don't want to carry around a larger iPad to school and back (I'll also use it for fitness+ and have used it for entertainment while travelling). I see it as totally different than my iPhone: I really have no interest in the iPhone Max as it's way to big for my daily use.
    Agreed.  My phone and tablet have completely different purposes.  My iPhone 12 mini is a small, utilitarian, all-purpose device to get me through my mobile day.  My iPad is an at-home or more sedentary device that puts me in a completely different state of mind.  I don't carry or want to carry my iPad around with me everywhere, and I don't want a giant phone uncomfortably bumbling around in my pockets all day either.

    The iPad mini feels like a great tablet replacement to my Pro 10.5, with a more comfortable form factor and a screen that's not far off.  Looking forward to picking one up.
    Graeme000williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • A12Z chip in 2020 iPad Pro confirmed to be recycled A12X


    roake said:
    iadlib said:
    Can they be sued for that? Selling a product that you later find out was intentionally hobbled?
    While I suppose people can sue for anything, I think the spirit of the answer is no.  The original device met the specifications it was advertised with.  The fact that it had an underlying inactivated graphics core should be legally irrelevant.  Perhaps the had cooling or other issues with the overall design when that core was active.
    It’s not that it was “inactivated” previously. Making chips is hard, many chips fail to achieve 100% of the desired features. The failure/success rate is the yield. Over time you get better at making them and your yield improves. Doing it at scale is a massive undertaking. Now making the A12 series is hitting better numbers, resulting in chips with the full number of cores.
    This.  All semiconductor companies do this to some extent as a new chip design will have significant yield losses at launch.  In order to salvage the breakthrough design process, it's common practice to allow for some acceptable level of manufacturing flaw and lower the threshold of perfection so that things remain cost effective and less wasteful for the manufacturer and for the consumer.

    Two years later, the A12X is now refined to the point where the defect rate is reduced and a higher standard is cost effective and can be provided to the consumer at equal or lesser price than originally.
    StrangeDaysstompywatto_cobra
  • Apple Watch Series 7 uses same processor as predecessor

    bageljoey said:
    reelgeek said:
    …this isn't unprecedented.  It is disappointing.  
    But why exactly is it disappointing? What is it that the AW6 processor can’t do that you need more power for?

    If they realized that their processor capability already surpassed software demands, I commend them for focusing their advancements (Screen seize, fast charging, durability) elsewhere—where people will actually see the benefits! 

    I imagine they are working on a faster processor and will have it ready when it’s needed—just not to satisfy the spec obsessed. 
    I would agree as well.  I have a S5 and I never sit there thinking that it's not fast enough given the types of applications it runs.  This is largely the same with the iPhone or iPad... even years after their introduction, the older devices rarely make me cringe as I work with them.  I think memory (RAM) might have a larger impact as it pertains to OS updates.

    As someone who grew up in the earlier years of computing, I truly remember how much each generation of processor design impacted the day-to-day usability of things.  Yearly A-series and S-series updates sometimes feel like an unnecessary (but not unappreciated) luxury.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra