fastasleep

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fastasleep
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  • The top seven MacBook Air features that make the 2018 model great

    henrybay said:
    I really don’t understand why people equate key travel with a quality typing experience or responsiveness. I’m finding quite the opposite to the point where using someone’s previous gen keyboards as I did yesterday feels super odd and less preferable. I absolutely love the new keyboards. 
    Because key travel is as important to typing as it is to playing on a piano. Sure, Steinway could make pianos with ultra shallow key travel but the experience would be horrible. 

    They keys on Apple’s butterfly keyboards feel more like buttons than keys. You click them rather than push them. There is no real feedback. Just a flat, finger numbing experience. 

    It’s such a shame because Apple used to make the best notebook keyboards in the business.  But their obsession with thinness has turned an enjoyable typing experience into a pain - especially when typing anything longer than an email. 


    Strongly disagree, as I type measurably faster on the new MBP keyboard. Also keys *are* buttons. Piano keys actually have physical properties that go with the fact they’re controlling giant hammers hitting strings, it’s not an apt analogy. The sense that “pushing” keys is somehow a requirement is false. 

    If your fingers are going numb, you’re obviously hitting the keyboard too hard and not adapting to the reduced need for force when typing. 
    chia
  • The top seven MacBook Air features that make the 2018 model great

    kiowavt said:
    I own one. Keyboard does seem better than my MacBook Pro which had so many keyboard issues Apple finally replaced it. And the larger trackpad is a mixed bag. I had to give up on the MacBook Pro as a tiny graze of the trackpad would delete things or move the cursor to a new place. Has happened only a few times so far with the new Air, but I had an Air years back and never had that. Finally the fan. So far, for me, runs 100% of the time. Pretty loud. I have tried closing apps, etc, but now just try to tune it out.
    If the fan is coming on during light use or no active use at all, you might wanna get it checked out. It should stay quiet unless under load. 
    chia
  • How to get started with a new HomePod, and get more out of it

    elcptn said:
    elcptn said:
    Thanks for the useful how-to article. How tied is the Homepod to a particular iPhone, rather than to one Apple ID? My wife and I use the same Apple ID on our phones. If the Homepod is set up using her phone, will I be able to use the Homepod when she is not in the house (or her phone is switched off)? Will I be able to listen to music but not, say, send messages? Or will it use my iPhone because the Apple ID is the same?
    Why on Earth would you share an Apple ID with someone? You’re literally doing it wrong. 
    So we can share one Photo library and also share one iCloud Drive. I don't think that we're the only ones with this requirement and this solution. However, I certainly agree that it brings problems in other areas.
    Huh. Why not just use Family Sharing and/or iCloud Photo Sharing in Photos so you have shared albums? iCloud Drive is a bit more complicated as you can only share individual files with others and not entire folders, something like Dropbox is a better solution for that (at least for now - I hope they add folder sharing in the next OSes. 
    jbdragon
  • Apple tapped as contender for J.J. Abrams' Bad Robot studio


    robbyx said:

    designr said:
    robbyx said:
    robbyx said:
    I'm not against Apple producing original content, but I don't think it's going to turn into a major revenue stream for them.  I worry the quest for content is a fool's errand.  For years I've said they should buy Nintendo and I still think that would be the best acquisition they could make.  The lion's share of App Store revenue is video games and IAP associated with video games.  Nintendo is profitable, has numerous well-established and beloved global franchises, and does good work when it comes to hardware and game controllers.  I hope the original content play works out for Apple, but I think getting serious about gaming would be a much smarter move.
    The thing with original content, all it takes is a few hit shows. Look at Netflix. There is a ton of crap they produce but they do have hit shows. As far as Nintendo goes, I completely agree. With their huge catalog of titles, imagine what that would do for the neglected (with gaming) Apple TV. The gaming market is booming worldwide. That would be a smart move by Apple to invest in that $140 billion/yearly and growing piece of the pie. 
    My concern with content is that Apple is late to the game.  They should never have let Netflix become Netflix.  I'm a big Apple fan and longtime customer (35 years!), but it will take a lot to convince me that I need another streaming service.  Netflix has become a juggernaut.  Yes, Apple has "disrupted" other markets successfully in the past, but there's no guarantee they can do it again.  It seems expensive and risky whereas Nintendo is basically a guaranteed win.  Nintendo has some of the most well recognized gaming franchises in the world.  They have a huge built-in fan base who buys every new console they release.  They are the king of mobile gaming (and I don't mean smartphone games).  It seems like such a no-brainer to me.  Slogging it out in the fickle original content space - trying to build a back catalog of hits, trying to convince the public they need another service - seems highly risky and, frankly, more like a vanity project than anything else.  Gaming prints money.  Why Apple continues to treat it in a very half-assed way makes no sense to me (and never has).
    You don't think they have smart people being paid a lot of money to weigh all of these sorts of things and make well-informed decisions? 
    Probably. But there are lots of companies with smart people being paid to make such decisions. It's not just about those aspects. It's also about will, vision, strategy, etc. What's more, people in companies can often be blinded by their current circumstances and past history. There's a reason why so few companies make major successful leaps into new industries or even products in their same industry. There's a certain institutional inertia and blindness that can occur anywhere. I seriously doubt Apple is immune to these kind of things...long term. In fact large and very successful companies can also have hubris that leads to over-confidence about potential success in other industries. I suspect things like gaming, entertainment (movies, TV, media, etc.) are very different from what Apple has been really good at for its entire existence. Those differences shouldn't be taken lightly.
    Well said.  And we know that Apple isn't immune to institutional inertia.  They've done it before.  Anyone remember the 90s?  I think so many Apple fans have become so lazy when it comes to their own opinions about Apple.  They've become incapable of objectively critiquing anything Apple does due to Apple's past decade of success.  Any criticism is automatically dismissed because Apple never makes mistakes and disrupts every industry they touch in these people's minds.  Of course these people's memories are also very short.  It wasn't always that way and it's foolish to assume that just because Apple (or any company) has had a successful run, that that run will go on forever.

    I'll also add that I don't think Apple has been very smart at all when it comes to video.  They should - and could - have entered the content arena much sooner, but Eddie Cue is perhaps the least visionary executive they have.  He's been asleep at the wheel while Netflix built a global brand.  Unlike user experience and customer service, original content doesn't give them much room to distinguish themselves.  It's either good or bad and the (often fickle) public will respond accordingly.
    *cough* Two decades.

    Two decades which have seen monumental growth. The best portable music player. The best phone. The best tablet. The best smart watch. The best mobile silicon. Apple Pay, Apple Music, and other services growing rapidly. Stable Mac sales in a contracting PC market. I'd say that's a pretty good track record. They don't need to completely own the original content field — just do it well in order to bolster their services and ecosystem lock-in.

    Sorry, but I'm gonna bet on Apple over the FUD peddlers.
    randominternetpersonAppleExposed
  • Apple tapped as contender for J.J. Abrams' Bad Robot studio

    designr said:
    robbyx said:
    robbyx said:
    I'm not against Apple producing original content, but I don't think it's going to turn into a major revenue stream for them.  I worry the quest for content is a fool's errand.  For years I've said they should buy Nintendo and I still think that would be the best acquisition they could make.  The lion's share of App Store revenue is video games and IAP associated with video games.  Nintendo is profitable, has numerous well-established and beloved global franchises, and does good work when it comes to hardware and game controllers.  I hope the original content play works out for Apple, but I think getting serious about gaming would be a much smarter move.
    The thing with original content, all it takes is a few hit shows. Look at Netflix. There is a ton of crap they produce but they do have hit shows. As far as Nintendo goes, I completely agree. With their huge catalog of titles, imagine what that would do for the neglected (with gaming) Apple TV. The gaming market is booming worldwide. That would be a smart move by Apple to invest in that $140 billion/yearly and growing piece of the pie. 
    My concern with content is that Apple is late to the game.  They should never have let Netflix become Netflix.  I'm a big Apple fan and longtime customer (35 years!), but it will take a lot to convince me that I need another streaming service.  Netflix has become a juggernaut.  Yes, Apple has "disrupted" other markets successfully in the past, but there's no guarantee they can do it again.  It seems expensive and risky whereas Nintendo is basically a guaranteed win.  Nintendo has some of the most well recognized gaming franchises in the world.  They have a huge built-in fan base who buys every new console they release.  They are the king of mobile gaming (and I don't mean smartphone games).  It seems like such a no-brainer to me.  Slogging it out in the fickle original content space - trying to build a back catalog of hits, trying to convince the public they need another service - seems highly risky and, frankly, more like a vanity project than anything else.  Gaming prints money.  Why Apple continues to treat it in a very half-assed way makes no sense to me (and never has).
    You don't think they have smart people being paid a lot of money to weigh all of these sorts of things and make well-informed decisions? 
    Probably. But there are lots of companies with smart people being paid to make such decisions. It's not just about those aspects. It's also about will, vision, strategy, etc. What's more, people in companies can often be blinded by their current circumstances and past history. There's a reason why so few companies make major successful leaps into new industries or even products in their same industry. There's a certain institutional inertia and blindness that can occur anywhere. I seriously doubt Apple is immune to these kind of things...long term. In fact large and very successful companies can also have hubris that leads to over-confidence about potential success in other industries. I suspect things like gaming, entertainment (movies, TV, media, etc.) are very different from what Apple has been really good at for its entire existence. Those differences shouldn't be taken lightly.
    So in other words,

    "PC guys are not going to just figure this out. They're not going to just walk in."

    or

    “Payments is a tough ecosystem and you know, other players, other major consumer Internet companies have tried to enter in the space and have found, you know, limited success,” said Bill Ready, CEO of Braintree, the parent company of mobile payment services providers PayPal and Venmo. “And a big part of that is it is a very difficult space.”

    etc.
    AppleExposed