Apple likely to delay rollout of Windows 7 support

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Apple is likely to miss a self-imposed deadline for delivering support for Microsoft's latest operating system to Mac users running its Boot Camp dual booting software.



In October, the Cupertino-based Mac maker said it planned to deliver support for Windows 7 through an update to Boot Camp that would arrive be year's end.



"Apple will support Microsoft Windows 7 (Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate) with Boot Camp in Mac OS X Snow Leopard before the end of the year," the company wrote in a support document. "This support will require a software update to Boot Camp."



Asked whether Apple still planned to make good on that promise, a company support representative fielding Boot Camp-related questions said his division has received no update on the matter and his belief was that the update was still undergoing tests.



The representative said it was very unlikely that the update would surface in the next 24 hours, adding that a release sometime early next year would be a safer bet.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 76
    You mean I'm not supposed to be already running Windows 7 on my Mac Pro? Oops? Should I uninstall it and wait for Apple to support it?



    Windows 7 is running beautifully on my Mac already. What the heck do I need Apple for?
  • Reply 2 of 76
    Probably waiting on official driver support and certification. It may currently work with some hardware and software, but not others.



    Please take you time, test it, and get it working right Apple before it is publicly released.
  • Reply 3 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thespaz View Post


    You mean I'm not supposed to be already running Windows 7 on my Mac Pro? Oops? Should I uninstall it and wait for Apple to support it?



    Windows 7 is running beautifully on my Mac already. What the heck do I need Apple for?



    What is the real benefit versus a virtual machine? I prefer to have other OSes running in a window on a separate display.
  • Reply 4 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    What is the real benefit versus a virtual machine? I prefer to have other OSes running in a window on a separate display.



    Performance. It's always faster to run an OS natively than in a virtual machine running on top of another OS.
  • Reply 5 of 76
    seek3rseek3r Posts: 179member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    What is the real benefit versus a virtual machine? I prefer to have other OSes running in a window on a separate display.



    On my MP? Gaming on windows and performance on linux. On windows I want DX10 (though I dont honestly game all that often).



    When I boot to debian I want the OS to see all 8 cores - there's many scientific apps I run that work *far* better on linux. Usually I run them on one of several clusters available to me, but sometimes I need to test things locally.
  • Reply 6 of 76
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thespaz View Post


    You mean I'm not supposed to be already running Windows 7 on my Mac Pro? Oops? Should I uninstall it and wait for Apple to support it?



    Windows 7 is running beautifully on my Mac already. What the heck do I need Apple for?



    Not supported does not mean it?s not possible, obviously. The article should have mentioned that it?s easy to run Win7 natively on a Mac.
  • Reply 7 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Not supported does not mean it?s not possible, obviously. The article should have mentioned that it?s easy to run Win7 natively on a Mac.



    Win7 Home Premium is working fine for me on my 2007 iMac running Snow Leopard. Huge improvements over Vista Home Premium in terms of speed and performance.
  • Reply 8 of 76
    This can be had for around $40 (after sales and rebates). Works like magic.
  • Reply 9 of 76
    Win 7 runs fine on my Macbook Pro, except the track bad is buggy as hell under Windows 7 and I can't update my video drivers. Full support would be nice.
  • Reply 10 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    What is the real benefit versus a virtual machine?



    In my experience, both Fusion and Parallels are slow, buggy, take up a lot of space, and cause all kinds of shut-down problems (even on my new machines). I have Bootcamp running XP on a 3+ year-old machine, and it is vastly superior -- simply no comparison.
  • Reply 11 of 76
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    Are you running it in Boot Camp or in Virtualization software like Fusion? If in Boot Camp, that is interesting.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thespaz View Post


    You mean I'm not supposed to be already running Windows 7 on my Mac Pro? Oops? Should I uninstall it and wait for Apple to support it?



    Windows 7 is running beautifully on my Mac already. What the heck do I need Apple for?



  • Reply 12 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thespaz View Post


    What the heck do I need Apple for?



    uh...you need it to run windows on your mac. maybe.
  • Reply 13 of 76
    tbelltbell Posts: 3,146member
    I think the virtues of each method largely depends on how often you need to use Windows and for what. I have some Windows specific software that I use everyday and regularly as part of my job. Boot camp is not a solution for me under these circumstances because I need to switch between the Windows software and Macs software in the matter of minutes.



    With Boot Camp, I'd have to start up the Mac every time I wanted to switch OSes. I like Fusion a lot, and it is a far better solution then the old Virtual PC. For processor intensive applications there is a speed hit, but I do not notice it. This probably is because at work I use an old PC running the same Windows software I use on my Mac with Fusion. At home, my Mac is brand new and puts the old Windows machine to shame.



    When I want to play a Windows game, I usually use Boot Camp because I do not need to switch between Mac and Windows programs and the performance is better.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    What is the real benefit versus a virtual machine? I prefer to have other OSes running in a window on a separate display.



  • Reply 14 of 76
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBell View Post


    Are you running it in Boot Camp or in Virtualization software like Fusion? If in Boot Camp, that is interesting.



    Pretty straightforward. Anyone who wants to run it natively doesn?t need to wait for Apple. Pretty much all the Vista drivers work with Win7. The only caveat is the touchpad driver, as mentioned above by Tcrown, but in all honesty I haven?t heard of a multi-touch trackpad that works great under any other vendor with Windows running.
  • Reply 15 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    In my experience, both Fusion and Parallels are slow, buggy, take up a lot of space, and cause all kinds of shut-down problems



    http://www.virtualbox.org/
  • Reply 16 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mac_dog View Post


    uh...you need it to run windows on your mac. maybe.



    Nope. You don't need Apple or Boot Camp for that.
  • Reply 17 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by OriginalMacRat View Post


    http://www.virtualbox.org/



    What is the purpose of this link? Are you saying it's better than (or as good as) Bootcamp? If so, I would love to see some proof, or at least, additional data (instead of just a link).
  • Reply 18 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    What is the purpose of this link? Are you saying it's better than (or as good as) Bootcamp?



    Bootcamp requires your Mac boot as a Windows machine.



    Virtual Box runs Windows in an app on your Mac OS.
  • Reply 19 of 76
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thespaz View Post


    You mean I'm not supposed to be already running Windows 7 on my Mac Pro? Oops? Should I uninstall it and wait for Apple to support it?



    Windows 7 is running beautifully on my Mac already. What the heck do I need Apple for?



    Your Mac may be fine. Newer Macs with more Multi Touch trackpad features or a Magic Mouse, maybe not so much.
  • Reply 20 of 76
    nobody mentioned it yet, so I will in case some people didn't know this -



    one of the best ways of installing Win 7 (now or when it's officially supported with complete drivers, etc.) is to use Bootcamp in the standard manner to allocate an independent partition for Win 7. This of course will allow you to boot the computer into Win 7 natively. If you have Parallels 5 (not sure about Fusion or earlier versions) you can then create a virtual machine (inside of Mac OS X obviously) that can boot your bootcamp partition. It's really easy, just use the Parallels new virtual machine wizard. This will allow you to use the same Win 7 setup running natively by booting into it, or if you don't need the higher performance, you can also boot into the virtual version via Parallels at any time. Note, when I did this, Win 7 did ask me to re-activate Win 7 - I did this with no trouble though.



    I'm guessing that the virtual machine will probably perform a bit better when running Win 7 out of its own partition rather than a file within a Mac OS X partition.



    Enjoy,

    K



    PS. I don't work for Parallels - just a relatively happy user...
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