Apple's iPad deal gives Hachette pricing leverage against Amazon

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  • Reply 101 of 116
    igeniusigenius Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    The Media Server Mini is located anywhere there are 3 outlets (Mini and 2 external drives-- there is no KB, Mouse or display). Mine happens to be in a China cabinet in the dining room.



    The Media Server shows up as a shared device in everyone's iTunes:





    Got it. That seems great.



    But why a Mac Mini instead of a simple NAS drive or two?
  • Reply 102 of 116
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    Sorry, I understood some of what you meant, but I didn't write it clearly. But much of the same thing applies, what is really to be gained by separating the stores? What is your vision of how stores would be separated?



    I'm the one not writing clearly. I was talking about separating more the access to the store within iTunes, which seems to be the biggest complaint I hear from people (mostly on this forum). I'm not sure how that would be best served, if at all, but I do understand why some people don't like having the extra steps to access the App Store section of the iTunes Store. Perhaps just a option in Preferences that puts the App Store or iBookstore below the iTunes Store listing under Store in the side bar.





    PS: I'd like some method in iTunes to see your app stats. Something akin to Windows Program Manager. For instance, when you purchased and the last time you used an app. I get updates each week for apps I either haven't used in since I first bought them 20 months ago (some never even used once).
  • Reply 103 of 116
    With all this talk of Apple versus Amazon over the Kindle, a lot of people are forgetting what Amazon may be capable of in the long run. Here's an interesting article on the matter:



    http://www.alltabletnews.com/2010/02...-of-computing/
  • Reply 104 of 116
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    The Media Server Mini is located anywhere there are 3 outlets (Mini and 2 external drives-- there is no KB, Mouse or display). Mine happens to be in a China cabinet in the dining room.



    Apple really needs to release a proper Home Server. They don't seem to be missing any pieces to develop this. I'm imagining a multi-drive system with an Apple A4 processor and stripped down version of iPhone OS. The Time Capsule is okay for the average user but has no remote access and doesn't scale well without multiple drives. A Mac Mini is fine for those technically inclined to put in a little extra setup but not ideal for the average Mac user.
  • Reply 105 of 116
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I'm the one not writing clearly. I was talking about separating more the access to the store within iTunes, which seems to be the biggest complaint I hear from people (mostly on this forum). I'm not sure how that would be best served, if at all, but I do understand why some people don't like having the extra steps to access the App Store section of the iTunes Store. Perhaps just a option in Preferences that puts the App Store or iBookstore below the iTunes Store listing under Store in the side bar.





    PS: I'd like some method in iTunes to see your app stats. Something akin to Windows Program Manager. For instance, when you purchased and the last time you used an app. I get updates each week for apps I either haven't used in since I first bought them 20 months ago (some never even used once).



    I like the idea of app stats-- especially since we synch multiple iPhones, iPods (iPads) to a single iTunes account.



    While I understand the reasons for "logically" separating the stores, there are reasons for keeping them together (someone mentioned searches). I would add to this the whole purchasing/gift card/buying experience-- I want these consolidated for music, videos, app, eBooks and eventually hard (physical) goods.



    One stop shopping!



    *
  • Reply 106 of 116
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    While I understand the reasons for "logically" separating the stores, there are reasons for keeping them together (someone mentioned searches). I would add to this the whole purchasing/gift card/buying experience-- I want these consolidated for music, videos, app, eBooks and eventually hard (physical) goods.



    Works for me. I find all my apps via other sites anyway that link directly to its location in the store but it seems to be a common complaint. Maybe if they allowed for a refined search only within that section it would quell some of the complaints.
  • Reply 107 of 116
    newbeenewbee Posts: 2,055member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Aren't you being just a wee bit dogmatic? The concept of the "free public library" has been around for centuries. Why, many of them say that right over the door.



    I'm guessing you're being sarcastic .... if I'm wrong, I apologize ... sometimes the concept of subtle sarcasm goes right over my head. It's my opinion that too many of us accept the notion of getting something for nothing without ever caring how that "something" is being paid for ... and let's face it ... every thing costs something, even if the "costs" are hidden. Just sayin'.
  • Reply 108 of 116
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by newbee View Post


    Libraries are not "free". They exist because of volunteers, donations and/or government funding which, btw, comes out of your pocket and mine, whether we use them or not. Get rid of the idea that something is free just because you don't have to reach into your pocket and pay. There is no such thing as a free lunch. Would you work for nothing? I think not.




    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Aren't you being just a wee bit dogmatic? The concept of the "free public library" has been around for centuries. Why, many of them say that right over the door.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by newbee View Post


    I'm guessing you're being sarcastic .... if I'm wrong, I apologize ... sometimes the concept of subtle sarcasm goes right over my head. It's my opinion that too many of us accept the notion of getting something for nothing without ever caring how that "something" is being paid for ... and let's face it ... every thing costs something, even if the "costs" are hidden. Just sayin'.



    Actually, you are both right.



    Many of the "Public Libraries" in this and foreign countries were established by industrialist/philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.



    He donated money to build and stock free libraries and provided annual funding for their operation.



    An important part of the concept required the participation of volunteers and additional local funding.



    The idea was to seed self-fulfillment by members of the local communities-- it was to be their library.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_library



    IMO, the concept is timeless and something that would be valuable in the information age!



    *
  • Reply 109 of 116
    successsuccess Posts: 1,039member
    ***





    I don't like the idea of ebooks on loan because I don't want a dirty used ebook sitting on my clean iPad book shelf.
  • Reply 110 of 116
    igeniusigenius Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I'm imagining a multi-drive system with an Apple A4 processor and stripped down version of iPhone OS.



    That would be very cool. I want one.



    I've imagined a central data repository in homes, kept out of the way, next to the furnace or wherever, that would do the heavy lifting for the various access devices scattered around the house.
  • Reply 111 of 116
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    It is cheaper, you can't compare it to the remainders or used price. The prices given so far that I've seen are for ebook versions during the hardcover phase of the release cycle. Amazon's price for a Harry Potter hard cover book is $20 (list: $30). If the ebook is listed at $15, it will be cheaper. We don't know how the ebook will be priced when the paperback is released. If they still list at $15 for when the paperback is released, only then will we know how serious they are.







    In past discussions, there were multiple links that gave the cost breakdown for publishing a book. The printing & paper is only 10% of the cost. Distribution is 10%. Typical retailer portion is 40%. Apple takes 30% on most media they sell (iTunes store), and that doesn't earn them more than a sliver of net profit. There are still costs with maintaining the electronic store. The best you can hope for here with electronic distribution is a 30% reduction in cost.



    So to make the same amount at on that $20 hardcover they have to sell it for $11.43 on ibook store
  • Reply 112 of 116
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macadamias View Post


    Yeah, the publisher's suggested price (which is the price that is used to determine the price to wholesalers which is generally around half that) is not what most people are comparing it to. They are comparing it to the discounted price which is up the the individual retailers, and some may decide to discount it below cost as a loss leader.



    They have said that they want a range of prices with a low end of maybe $5.99. Yet most all the articles are focused on the "new hardcover" price.



    But I am sure they will have a "hardcover" ebook format initially, followed by a "paperback" ebook format!
  • Reply 113 of 116
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member
    iTunesU



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DrJedi View Post


    Whatever happened to the idea of the public library? I'd be a little less hard on the iPad if Apple introduced some sort of book borrowing paradigm. Of course, there's no profit in that, and if something isn't profitable, then it's not worth doing, eh? It's a sad, sad, commercial world we live in. The promise of computer technology has turned into a salesman throwing sales pitches at us and giving corporations the ability to target us with advertising 24 x 7.



    I thought Apple was a hardware company where the software pushed sales of the hardware that people bought to create stuff. Now it's a media distribution company where the hardware is designed and constrained to push sales of media for consumption.



  • Reply 114 of 116
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    Actually, you are both right.



    Many of the "Public Libraries" in this and foreign countries were established by industrialist/philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.



    He donated money to build and stock free libraries and provided annual funding for their operation.



    An important part of the concept required the participation of volunteers and additional local funding.



    The idea was to seed self-fulfillment by members of the local communities-- it was to be their library.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_library



    IMO, the concept is timeless and something that would be valuable in the information age!



    *



    I guess until the iBook app is released, one of the more popular ePub readers is Digital Editions which does have a category of borrowed along with purchased, library, read etc.. Not sure how the borrowed part works since the only ePub books I've downloaded so far are completely free, but it is there. I've spent a number of hours learning everything I can get my hands on about creation and packaging of ePub documents and I have a pretty good handle on the xml/css involved. So I'm really anxiously anticipating the new paradigm that Apple is ushering in with the iBook app.
  • Reply 115 of 116
    igeniusigenius Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    So I'm really anxiously anticipating the new paradigm that Apple is ushering in with the iBook app.



    What am I missing? What is the new paradigm?



    I saw nothing different from what is currently being done elsewhere.
  • Reply 116 of 116
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iGenius View Post


    What am I missing? What is the new paradigm?



    I saw nothing different from what is currently being done elsewhere.



    The difference is that Apple is involved. From a historical perspective Apple has entered into existing markets before with a game changing formula, in the case of music players, cell phones and now e-readers. The fact that they have standardized on the already established ePub format is smart because it is open source xml based. Hopefully with their knack for getting the details right the iPad and iBook app will revolutionize the entire publishing business. That is what I find exciting.
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