Mac OS X market share up 29%, Leopard still most common

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
New statistics released this week show that the market share of Mac OS X in Web use has grown by 29.4 percent in the last year, while Windows has decreased 3.8 percent.



Web statistics company Quantcast found that Mac OS X represented 10.9 percent of total Web consumption in North America in January. Despite its losses over a year prior, Windows remains the dominant format with 86.8 percent of all Web use.



The analytics company noted that Windows share held steady for the last three months, following the introduction of Windows 7. But January repented a decline once again following a strong holiday season during which Apple sold 3.36 million Macs.



Mac OS X share also grew 7 percent between December and January, and also saw 5.2 percent quarterly growth. Windows saw a 0.9 percent increase in both monthly and quarterly share.



The greatest growth in Web use has been on mobile devices. Quantcast found that mobile operating systems increased their presence by 123.8 percent year-over-year in January. But even with that tremendous growth, mobile devices still represent just 1.3 percent of total Web use.







Quantcast also revealed that Mac OS X 10.5 remains the dominant version of Apple's operating system. In January, Leopard represented 52.1 percent of all Mac users.



However, adoption of Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard is rapid, with 27.3 percent of Mac users running Apple's latest operating system. Snow Leopard was released in August and got off to a strong sales start twice as high as the debut of Leopard and four times better than Tiger.



In January, 17.2 percent of Mac users were running Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, while 3.4 percent were on an earlier version.







For Microsoft, Windows XP remains the dominant platform, with 51.8 percent of users running the operating system. In fact, Quantast found that Windows XP actually gained share in January, due to strong sales of netbooks.



Windows Vista commands 37.4 percent of PC users, while Windows 7 has been adopted by 10.2 percent.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 161
    Most troubling of all:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    For Microsoft, Windows XP remains the dominant platform, with 51.8 percent of users running the operating system. In fact, Quantast found that Windows XP actually gained share in January, due to strong sales of netbooks.



    Windows Vista commands 37.4 percent of PC users, while Windows 7 has been adopted by 10.2 percent.



  • Reply 2 of 161
    I suspect that Leopard is still dominant is because there are many Mac users that have not moved to Intel Macs.
  • Reply 3 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post


    I suspect that Leopard is still dominant is because there are many Mac users that have not moved to Intel Macs.



    Well there are many Intel Mac users that haven't upgraded. Sales of Macs with Snow Leopard began only a few months ago. It'l take some time for Snow Leopard to spread via new Mac sales. Give it a few quarters. . . .
  • Reply 4 of 161
    cbswecbswe Posts: 116member
    Not to be picky.. But the news title should say something about the numbers only regards the US market. Not worldwide as per assumption.
  • Reply 5 of 161
    From my own experience and other people I know, I don't recommend anyone upgrading to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big fat headache.
  • Reply 6 of 161
    Windows XP is as far as I'm ever going to go with Microsoft. But I did upgrade to Snow Leopard. I just wish I had waited until they worked the bugs out. I'm still getting crashes, my Widgets don't work anymore. Apple needs to stop releasing stuff before it's ready if they want to flip people to the Mac. How many people gave Aperture a shot and went running back to the competition? Sometimes once chance is all you get.
  • Reply 7 of 161
    Couldn't disagree more. Snow Leopard has been flawless for me and everyone I know. And it brought major improvements that I use everyday:



    - Cisco VPN to work

    - Exchange email to work

    - Built-in drivers for Epson Artison 800 that work far better then the junk Epson used

    - Automation improvements and Grand Central framework for development



    You don't have to upgrade, but quite a few software developers are switching to Snow Leopard only. Apple introduced far too many "under-the-hood" programming improvements that make them salivate.
  • Reply 8 of 161
    zunxzunx Posts: 620member
    Thanks.



    What about worldwide?
  • Reply 9 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Well there are many Intel Mac users that haven't upgraded. Sales of Macs with Snow Leopard began only a few months ago. It'l take some time for Snow Leopard to spread via new Mac sales. Give it a few quarters. . . .



    However, there are many who had Leopard and upgraded to SL. I made my MBP purchase before SL's release and bought the SL $40 family pack. SL sales since its release have been setting records. The switch from Tiger on Intel Macs has been slower since some of the third party hardware and software may not be fully compatible with SL. SL does not support the older PowerPC chips--only wish Apple would continue to support them--I remember switching from my Mac iici to the Blue Tower G3.
  • Reply 10 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ctwise View Post


    Couldn't disagree more. Snow Leopard has been flawless for me and everyone I know. And it brought major improvements that I use everyday:



    - Cisco VPN to work

    - Exchange email to work

    - Built-in drivers for Epson Artison 800 that work far better then the junk Epson used

    - Automation improvements and Grand Central framework for development



    You don't have to upgrade, but quite a few software developers are switching to Snow Leopard only. Apple introduced far too many "under-the-hood" programming improvements that make them salivate.



    If Snow Leopard was a bust Apple wouldn't be breaking records in Mac sales. Especially when Macs are the more expensive option.
  • Reply 11 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    From my own experience and other people I know, I don't recommend anyone upgrading to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big fat headache.



    I had no problems upgrading, but then my MBP was less than 6 months old when I upgraded. Could be that older MBPs may have had some problems?
  • Reply 12 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post


    I had no problems upgrading, but then my MBP was less than 6 months old when I upgraded. Could be that older MBPs may have had some problems?



    I wondered about that myself. I have the very first Intel iMac, 2.1 GHZ dual core with two gigs of memory maximum. It should be able to handle Snow Leopard.



    I even did a clean install after nearly every Apple app crashed and right out of the gate I had iTunes crash. Never saw that happen before. Hope an upgrade is on the way. Apple has had a history of late releasing things that were not quite ready.



    Anyone else unable to use Widgets?
  • Reply 13 of 161
    finetunesfinetunes Posts: 2,065member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jerseymac View Post


    Apple has had a history of late releasing things that were not quite ready.



    Funny thing people have been saying this about MS for years. Apple has had some problems with their releases of hardware and software lately. They really need to do more testing before releasing their products. Rather wait a little longer than have to have problems that may not be fixable.
  • Reply 14 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Well there are many Intel Mac users that haven't upgraded. Sales of Macs with Snow Leopard began only a few months ago. It'l take some time for Snow Leopard to spread via new Mac sales. Give it a few quarters. . . .



    Only a few months ago? Are you serious. Snow Leopard was released six months ago. Its Windows 7 that was only released a few months ago. Not to mention SL was sold for 29.99.
  • Reply 15 of 161
    So if my rudimentary predictions/photoshop skills (or lack thereof) are to be believed, the Snow Leopard user base will begin to out number Leopard users by June 2010. If this is what analysts do, it's seriously easy.



  • Reply 16 of 161
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,251member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    From my own experience and other people I know, I don't recommend anyone upgrading to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big fat headache.



    I updates a few of our Macs ranging from MabBook to Mac Pro 8 Core and no problems to speak of.
  • Reply 17 of 161
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member
    I wonder how many people are still running OS 9.
  • Reply 18 of 161
    cubertcubert Posts: 728member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Well there are many Intel Mac users that haven't upgraded. Sales of Macs with Snow Leopard began only a few months ago. It'l take some time for Snow Leopard to spread via new Mac sales. Give it a few quarters. . . .



    And I bet a lot of people still on Leopard are waiting for 10.6.3.
  • Reply 19 of 161
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post


    From my own experience and other people I know, I don't recommend anyone upgrading to Snow Leopard. Nothing but a big fat headache.



    I have never had any problems with Snow Leopard but then again I installed everything including Rosetta and Quicktime 7. Not installing these two optional components seems to be where most of the so called "headaches" come from.
  • Reply 20 of 161
    I just came from a coffee shop in Beverly MA, and every laptop was an Apple. That's gotta mean something in an age diverse situation.
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