New hack could allow 'jailbroken' Apple iPads at launch

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
iPhone hacker George Hotz has demonstrated a new method to permanently "jailbreak" the iPhone 3GS, and he said the hack will "probably" work on the iPad, which goes on sale next week.



Hotz, known by his online handle "Geohot," updated his blog this week to reveal a new video demonstrating a jailbroken iPhone 3GS being rebooted. Jailbreaking is a practice that allows users to run unsigned code on the iPhone OS, which powers the iPhone, iPod touch and forthcoming iPad. It voids the warranty and can open up the device to security issues, but can also be used to allow new features like multitasking.



"The jailbreak is all software based, and is as simple to use as blackra1in," Hotz said, referencing his previous iPhone 3GS crack that employed a method known as a tethered jailbreak. "It is completely untethered, works on all current tethered models (ipt2, 3gs, ipt3), and will probably work on iPad too."



Late last year, Apple quietly updated the BootROM in the iPhone 3GS to thwart potential hackers. It marked the first time ever that the handset maker had modified its hardware in the middle of a product line, without a new model released.



The new BootROM, known as iBoot-359.32, has proven challenging for hackers, who have only been able to implement the tethered jailbreak, which requires users to connect their iPhone to a computer via USB every time they reboot the device. Hotz claims his latest hack will not require a USB connection.



While iPhone users can rely on jailbreaking to unlock their handset for use with unauthorized carriers, the 3G-capable version of the iPad, scheduled to arrive in late April, ships unlocked by default. However, its 3G frequencies are only compatible with AT&T in the U.S.



But the warranty-voiding jailbreak process can also allow users to run software Apple does not allow. Hackers have created their own custom applications that allow features like multitasking not currently permitted within the iPhone OS.







Apple and the jailbreaking community, led by Hotz and a separate group of hackers known as the iPhone Dev Team, have gone back and forth for some time, as the Cupertino, Calif., company has looked to close avenues used by hackers. One of the main concerns about jailbreaking is piracy, as the procedure can allow users to steal software from the App Store.



Users who jailbreak without knowledge of what they are doing could potentially open up their phone to exploits, as was revealed last November when the first-known iPhone worm attacked jailbroken handsets. The worm only affected users who did not change their phone's default SSH password, which allows file transfers between phones.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 72
    finetunesfinetunes Posts: 2,065member
    Wouldn't want to try this as it will void the warranty.
  • Reply 2 of 72
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    I don't know if permanent jailbreaking is possible. Apple will surely look at this hack and close that particular loophole. Another one will show up of course...
  • Reply 3 of 72
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,251member
    I have to think Apple have an internal team who try to hack so as to see the possible vulnerabilities. It seems they need to hire a few of these guys too.
  • Reply 4 of 72
    ilogicilogic Posts: 298member
    All I have to say is...
  • Reply 5 of 72
    swingeswinge Posts: 110member
    Says the video is a hacked 3GS? Anyone else notice the headphones at the bottom? Thin body? That's an iPod Touch right?
  • Reply 6 of 72
    elpasielpasi Posts: 6member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by swinge View Post


    Says the video is a hacked 3GS? Anyone else notice the headphones at the bottom? Thin body? That's an iPod Touch right?



    I was thinking it was a touch 3rd Gen too.
  • Reply 7 of 72
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,303member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post


    Wouldn't want to try this as it will void the warranty.



    One can always restore it.
  • Reply 8 of 72
    gotta be an ipod touch. looks pretty thick to be a touch though....
  • Reply 9 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post


    One can always restore it.



    Not true. The warranty is voided by the action of jailbreaking even if you subsequently restore the phone or pad. The question is whether anyone can tell what you did.



    If you restore the phone and Apple is unable to tell it was ever jailbroken, then you are still safe, but there's nothing to stop Apple from simply putting something in the firmware, or giving their store employees tools that can detect if the phone was ever *previously* jailbroken. So you can restore the phone, but it's still a gamble and if anyone finds out you did it, the warranty is still void.



    Also, relying on some shifty, anonymous, quasi-criminal on the Internet to restore your phone is almost as dumb as relying on that same person to jailbreak it for you IMO.
  • Reply 10 of 72
    finetunesfinetunes Posts: 2,065member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post


    One can always restore it.



    Not that I would want to try to jailbreak an iPad or other iDevise, I read that first if you should want to really know what you are doing and how to do it. Some who have tried have and didn't do it right were open to a worm attack specifically designed to attack that weakness. When these jailbreakers took their iPhones to an Apple store, they were informed that they had voided their warranty--so you broke it, you fix it.



    Thanks, you posted just before I got mine done.
  • Reply 11 of 72
    jglavinjglavin Posts: 93member
    This was expected, frankly I will wait until a jailbreak is published before I buy an ipad.
  • Reply 12 of 72
    s4mb4s4mb4 Posts: 267member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elpasi View Post


    I was thinking it was a touch 3rd Gen too.



    which is what makes the video even more exciting for the hacking community. the 3rd gen itouch has never been jailbroken untethered before. ever...
  • Reply 13 of 72
    jailbreaking is definitely more trouble than it's worth to an "old man" like myself, but it's really only akin to ripping the "do not remove" tag off of your mattress. There is no law that says you are a criminal for doing so other than Apple's stipulations and it's highly improbable Apple can detect it and even if they did, they are not going to brick your device. They've made similar statements about pirated software in the past, they feel it's not their responsibility. Unlike MSFT xbox fiasco when people "jailbroke" their 360's and MSFT bricked them



    Apple really only cares that you paid for the device, sure they don't want every phone, IPT or Ipad broken into. As long as it's not endemic I doubt it's worth too much effort to make it impregnable. All they have to do is make it "hard enough" that most people will find it just enough work to not be worth it.



    If this issue ever made it to the courts Apple might open padora's box.
  • Reply 14 of 72
    spotonspoton Posts: 645member
    Apple's attempts at creating a closed ecosystem will continue to fail.



    People in general detest being told what or what not they can do with something they put a lot of their hardworking hours to achieve.





    Anyone can get a computer and a AT&T 3G connect card and do whatever they want, disrupt the entire network if they can. Run any software they want. They are held liable for their actions.



    It makes no difference with the iPhone, it's a computer and a cell phone, people should be able to do what they want, run what software they want. They are held liable for their actions just the same.



    It's on AT&T's end to monitor their network and stop any disruptions, because there are bound to people that will do so regardless. Trying to prevent issues on the phone side is stupid and reeks of the bottom up approach to problem solving.





    The only reason the iPhone is locked down is to promote the App Store and profits for Apple. Step outside their closed ecosystem and you void your warranty, how stupid is that?



    Apple is about to repeat the same mistakes again with the iPad.





    A possible solution is to allow a legitimate means to jailbreak one's device, with appropriate risk warnings of course, therefore allowing software to be installed from third party sources outside the App Store.



    Apple can continue to update the iPhone OS and firmware, place safeguards in to protect the hardware just like they do with OS X and EFI.



    Leave the Disney World like "App Store" to the kiddies where Apple seems to like to keep it.





    If I want to play Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Removable Game with my large touchscreen iPad I should be allowed to do so, I'm a adult.
  • Reply 15 of 72
    dmfettdmfett Posts: 141member
    I know I am not much of a video maker ( http://www.peafowl.com/videoblog.html ) and a music teacher but can someone tell me the point of the video with the story "New hack could allow 'jailbroken' Apple iPads at launch". The story is good as well as the information and if one uses an imagination, the same can be said for the video ( this type of music is not my cup of tea, but I do use some of this kind of music in my class, for the kids, not me!) ...but my peacock videos make as much sense with story!



    Sorry,
  • Reply 16 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Not true. The warranty is voided by the action of jailbreaking even if you subsequently restore the phone or pad. The question is whether anyone can tell what you did.



    If you restore the phone and Apple is unable to tell it was ever jailbroken, then you are still safe, but there's nothing to stop Apple from simply putting something in the firmware, or giving their store employees tools that can detect if the phone was ever *previously* jailbroken. So you can restore the phone, but it's still a gamble and if anyone finds out you did it, the warranty is still void.



    Also, relying on some shifty, anonymous, quasi-criminal on the Internet to restore your phone is almost as dumb as relying on that same person to jailbreak it for you IMO.



    "quasi-criminal"? - that's a pretty serious bit of name calling there... Of course you have evidence for that right?
  • Reply 17 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by diamondgeeza View Post


    "quasi-crimial"? - that's a pretty serious bit of name calling there... Of course you have evidence for that right?



    Are you serious? Do you even know what "quasi-criminal" means?
  • Reply 18 of 72
    jb510jb510 Posts: 127member
    Danger danger will Robinson!



    Seriously this article is about 98% parental advisory note and 2% content, I'd hope for better from AI. Why don't you go ahead and suggest jailbreaking can cause cancer too.
  • Reply 19 of 72
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Are you serious? Do you even know what "quasi-criminal" means?



    How does jailbreaking an iPhone resemble any criminal activity at all?



    Edit: I guess you are referring to the guy who created the hack. You do need proof to back that up.
  • Reply 20 of 72
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Are you serious? Do you even know what "quasi-criminal" means?



    To me it means: A reference to a court's right to punish for actions or omissions as if they were criminal.



    The most common example is finding a parent who is delinquent in child support in contempt of court and penalizing him or her with a jail sentence. When a hearing is quasi-criminal, the quasi-defendant is entitled to all due process protections afforded a criminal defendant.



    What does it mean to you?
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